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Trying to pick between these tins. What would you do?


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I'm looking at these for presents down the road, this Fall and Christmas.  I know I want tins that are 3" across so that I can use the wax and wicks I'm used to (HTP 104/105 and IGI 4627 wax), but I also want people to be able to use them on a warmer plate if that's what they want to do instead of use the wick.  So what do you all think about the candle tins that are just about an inch tall?  Is that too short and squatty for a candle?  It's perfect for a candle warmer, because that's shallow enough that the entire chunk of wax would probably melt. 

 

I'm probably overthinking this, but it's the first time I'll have tinkered with tins so I'm trying to feel out my "comfort zone" with them.  And I guess my dilemma is entirely about aesthetics and not function.  I'm mostly wondering if that little flat one looks kind of odd and ugly, and if it really is the best way to go if I'm thinking mostly as melts and not candles, but I'm also thinking if my friends and relatives are ungrateful enough to nitpick something they're getting for free then maybe I ought to get better friends and relatives....... 

 

These are 3" wide and 2" tall:

https://www.naturesgardencandles.com/8oz-tin-with-lid

 

And these are the little squatty ones at 3" wide and 1" tall:

https://www.naturesgardencandles.com/flat-round-tin-with-lid-4-oz

 

I'd be open for other suggestions and ideas too.  Like I said, this will be the first time I've tinkered with tins.

 

 

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The shorter one will have “tea light” syndrome. Ever extinguish a tealight then later try to relight?  It is too shallow for the melt pool to be handled by a flame on a second burn.  Without overwicking to compensate these short tins are best suited for salves or melts.

 

The deeper tins have a chance to catch up as the sides of the tin warm and melt the wax toward the flame generating air current. Being deeper they are less attractive for warmer melts.

 

a 2-for-1 container is kinda hard... 

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My take on the taller one is that it will consume more wax giving the customer more burn hours. I refuse to use shallow containers for that purpose. So unless you are doing wickless I would opt for the taller tins. The shallow tins are what I would use only for wickless candles.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here is my opinion :) if you are still looking for opinions...

 

I think the shallow tin is very cool. I like them and have considered trying them out. I think they have a modern vibe.

BUT as mentioned, they probably will not be so great to light and use repeatedly.

 

Do all candle tin descriptions mention RUST?? I have never noticed that before. I assume they are seamless?

I have been looking for gold tins and I have noticed that many tins are actually not made for candles, and it can be a little tricky if you aren't used to sourcing tins (which I am not).

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/1/2019 at 4:02 PM, candlesinflorida said:

Do all candle tin descriptions mention RUST?? I have never noticed that before. I assume they are seamless?

I have been looking for gold tins and I have noticed that many tins are actually not made for candles, and it can be a little tricky if you aren't used to sourcing tins (which I am not).

 

A long time ago I searched for tins and I do remember that there are some out there that have a particular coating that is suppose to prevent them from rusting due to chemical reactions with candle mixes. I know some tins will rust because some candles that I have purchased have rusted and the pale colored wax looked rusty too around the edges.

 

Right now I could only find Silver rust resistant candle tins at Papermart.

https://www.amazon.com/RUST-RESISTANT-DEEP-ROUND-STEEL/dp/B00HUV7FV4

https://www.papermart.com/p/rust-resistant-tin-cans/52907

https://www.papermart.com/p/rust-resistant-screw-lid-tin-cans/53054

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I spoke too soon. After I posted about rust...guess what happened??! Rust.

I was working with 100 gold tins from specialty bottle. Everything was fine until I switched from 444 wax to 415, just for the last 10-15 candles. For some odd reason, all those candles developed a weird orangey ring along the edge of the wax.

Edited by candlesinflorida
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3 minutes ago, candlesinflorida said:

I spoke too soon. After I posted about rust...guess what happened??! Rust.

I was working with 100 gold tins from specialty bottle. Everything was fine until I switched from 444 wax to 415, just for the last 10-15 candles. For some odd reason, all those candles developed a weird orangey ring along the edge of the wax.

 

Yes, that's what I've seen before. I bought some candles on Amazon from Wax and Oils and over time they developed that rust look around the wax and the rim of the tin. Oxidation or some sort of chemical reaction.

https://www.amazon.com/Oils-Aromatherapy-Scented-Candles-Vanilla/dp/B01013WAZ8/ref=sr_1_31?keywords=soy%2Bwax%2Bcandles%2Bin%2Btins&qid=1564370981&s=gateway&sr=8-31&th=1

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2 hours ago, candlesinflorida said:

I spoke too soon. After I posted about rust...guess what happened??! Rust.

I was working with 100 gold tins from specialty bottle. Everything was fine until I switched from 444 wax to 415, just for the last 10-15 candles. For some odd reason, all those candles developed a weird orangey ring along the edge of the wax.

Yes - this 

I always ran into this years ago with 135 and 464 waxes - rust rust rust everytime

I believe they came from CS but as of late in trying them again I haven’t seen it at all - got them at specialty this time 

You don’t wash them do you?  I didn’t think back then I did but was told water would be the reason 🤷‍♀️  But like I said I haven’t seen it at all again since and as sorry as I am it happened to you, I’m kinda glad I wasn’t crazy 😂

Edited by moonshine
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6 hours ago, moonshine said:

I always ran into this years ago with 135 and 464 waxes - rust rust rust everytime

I believe they came from CS but as of late in trying them again I haven’t seen it at all - got them at specialty this time 

You don’t wash them do you?  I didn’t think back then I did but was told water would be the reason 🤷‍♀️  But like I said I haven’t seen it at all again since and as sorry as I am it happened to you, I’m kinda glad I wasn’t crazy 😂

 

That's a good point, if the tins had been washed before use. I hadn't thought about that situation. I know my metal wax tart molds says not to wash with water because they will end up rusting, only wipe down with rubbing alcohol. And/or it's sounding like certain waxes or maybe FOs has an ingredient in them that interacts with the metal tins? Things to keep in mind I guess. I've not been making candles in tins yet but plan on doing so in the future.

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10 hours ago, candlesinflorida said:

I spoke too soon. After I posted about rust...guess what happened??! Rust.

I was working with 100 gold tins from specialty bottle. Everything was fine until I switched from 444 wax to 415, just for the last 10-15 candles. For some odd reason, all those candles developed a weird orangey ring along the edge of the wax.

That may not be “rust”.  Most tins I have found from popular retailers have a clear coating. Could the orange ring be a reaction from the gold paint with the acidic vegetable wax or the FO and/or the sealant lacquer? 

 

I have had discoloration on occasion inside silver tins from vanillas oxidizing and staining the coating, but never actual corrosion (rust). Not sure the tin alloy used in typical candle containers is chemically capable of “rusting”. Staining, sure. 

 

The clear coated tins from candle science, specialty bottle, and sks I’ve used (and reused) for years have been washed in soapy water, and soaked with alcohol to remove residual waxes for testing new candles with no sign of corrosion/rust.

 

Maybe try scratching the gold to see if it’s the paint reacting? 

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  • 7 months later...

Being on the topic of what material / lining would be ok for candles, I have a question.  I have seen some candle companies (mostly primitive) use soup cans.  I myself do not eat that many canned goods so I was on the hunt for cans with no labels.  I found some online but they say they are "gold polyester lined", some that say "enamel lined", "electrolytic tin coated steel", etc.  I am going to order and test for myself but does anyone here have more experience in knowing these materials?  Do not mind some great knowledge on this to save me some hassle if I knew for sure it does not work well.  

Edited by lovelyscents
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