Jump to content

Just starting out/Frustrated already


 Share

Recommended Posts

So I started making candles about 4 months ago, decided to try and make a business out of it about 1 month and half or so ago. Some days are great, others are so frustrating I want to cry.... then quit. I am having a lot of trouble with my container candles. Whenever I pour them, they get "steam-looking" spots on the the jars in between the glass and the candle. Another consistant problem is when I am working with soy wax it looks as though it has slipped, or shrunk away from the glass. and melted back down or something. What do I do to get the perfect container candle?

With pillars, I always get a seam line where I poured my second pour. Always! I have tried getting the wax hotter, tried keeping it cooloer.

I really want to make this a success so I can open a candle shop (there is nothing like that in my area and I know it would do good) and I love making candles. Please help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Sparkette,

I think if you click on the search tab here and do a search for wet spots,I think you may find lots of info. about your problem with the wax pulling away from the jars. There are also threads on tempering wax and that may help some also in keeping the wax from pulling from the jars....not sure though. Just search for tempering and you will find lots of info. on that as well....HTHS! Perhaps Vicky or Scented or Stella_1952 or Judy,USMC and other well qualified ladies will chime in and help you more than I can. :) Hmmmmm......I seem to have forgotten my manners....Welcome to the board!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What type of wax are you using? Wet spots are a real pain in the butt...I switched waxes and tested all over again just to minimize them . I was using J50 and switched to GL 70/30. But I have only been making candles for 2 yrs and am no pro..by far! I'm learning everyday and going insane everyday! So welcome to the world of insanity and have fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some days are great, others are so frustrating I want to cry.... then quit.

Same here, and for everyone else who's worked on candles more than a few days. (((hug))) Not to scare you, but as of right now, I have spent well over $1000 (I lost track of exactly how much) and I am nowhere near to the point I think I could sell. It is frustrating, so if you don't really love it you're not going to stick with it. At the least you are not going to be ready for a business for awhile yet.

I keep notes by keeping a text document open and copy/pasting all the notes I want to save in it. Easier than writing them.

Darbla

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sit down here for a few hours, get a notebook and some pencils, and read. You will also have to do a fair amount of experimenting. Don't expect to have a candle business anytime soon, but keep working and learning. That has to come first. Good luck.

Exactly. You're in big rush to make money off a business you have little experience with the product. Take the time to learn the craft and try things that will help out. Four months isn't adequate. It's the reason people who come here looking for a quick buck get jumped on about slowing down and perfecting one thing before moving on or even dreaming about a business. Hard to swallow with $ signs in your eyes. In the long run, the footwork/studying/testing will mean the difference in your quality. It'll also determine how long you last.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With pillars, I always get a seam line where I poured my second pour. Always! I have tried getting the wax hotter, tried keeping it cooloer.

On that last pour, only fill in the center and do not pour past/above the line of the 1st layer.

Now if your talking about a two colored candles and you're getting a line between them, then it's a matter of pouring at the right time. The second pour needs to be done before the 1st pour has completely set up so the two layers will adhear. It's a matter of timing and comes with practice. HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

welcome to the board! I think we took a loss for my candle making for 3 years on our income tax..I don't think I'll ever really get out of the red and into the black, also everyone is right about rushing..pouring candles and opening a shop can even leave the best candlemaker open to liability regardless of whatever warning labels you put on your candles. And NEVER underestimate the amount of testing you will have to do. I had one customer who thought making candles was as simple as melting wax, scenting and pouring..she decided to go into business for herself..she soon found out that the amount of money needed at start up was a lot more than she would spend on purchasing candles and tarts. Best advice I ever gave myself I will give to you...don't let your customers see you working..lol...they will try to turn into your competition...lol..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome, sparkette! Kick back and take a deeeep breath. Many folks think candlemaking is as easy as melting wax and sticking in a wick. Nothing could be further from the truth. Start slow and do your homework. Read, read, read. Friends and family are usually great folks to help with feedback and testing. Although it is expensive to start and learn, keep in mind that gifting of handmade items does save bucks that would have been spent on store-bought gifts. Don't be in a rush to sell!! Selling to the general public requires a certain amount of expertise and business acumen, not to mention the requisite insurance, licenses, etc. Keep THAT pressure off your back while learning your craft. I am always amazed at how QUICKLY people want to get into sales and how others encourage it... there's a LOT to this business and you will NOT learn it overnight!

Hobbies cost money no matter what medium! Recouping your investment is NOT the end-all and be-all... there is the satisfaction of making things and learning the craft. Even if you never sell a thing and simply make candles for your own enjoyment and for gifting, that's a worthy endeavor.

Once, when my ex-husband complained to a friend about how much money I spent on my artistic pursuits, the friend asked him if I was on drugs, going to a shrink several times a week, running around on him or drinking heavily... The Ex said no to all four and the other guy told him, "Then you don't have sh*t to complain about, buddy!"

Probably shoulda married THAT guy instead!:laugh2::laugh2::laugh2:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the board! There is a lot of information on candlemaking in bookstores and on this messageboard. Reading and taking notes along with creating your own recipes will help you from getting so frustrated. If you really want to do this as a business then doing your homework and having the extra cash to sample different suppliers to see what candlemaking supplies work best for you. I got very lucky when I first started because the supplier I chose to order my supplies from had great supplies and everything fell into place, but I spent alot of money to get started. I did try soapmaking first and that worked for me, but it wasn't something I really got into, so I tried candlemaking and that has been my passion ever since.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read, go to the library and check out some books on candle making and read some more. Take notes. Use the search function here and read some more. Then focus on one type of candle and try to perfect that. This was my downfall. I wanted to make everything that was posted in the gallery. Went back to 1st base and focused on tarts, votives and hurricanes. Then went on to containers and now pillars. Plan on spending several thousand dollars learning.

Stella - I want the name and contact info for your ex's friend. :laugh2: My soon to be ex has told me his big issue is my candle making. I need a replacement that cooks and cleans. :laugh2:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

welcome welcome, making candles is adicting, frustrating, expensive. time consuming and fun all rolled into one lol. I have been "testing" for a little over 2 years (ya I know slow) but I have had to walk a way a few times and want everything to be perfect. I have spent thousands over the years between wax, scents wicks, pour pots ect.

Soy can be very tricky but once you get it down is beautiful. Wet spots happen and I even still get them on occassion when I pour many at one, one will have it or vice versa.

As others has said this is not a get qucik type of hobby, this forum is amazing and full of lots of info. Sometimes times you have to search way back but its amazing. Lots of good people with great advice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi from AZ. Like everyone else, I have been practicing for two years now. My testers are telling me that things are looking good with my rustic pillars. I know they are awesome to look at, but they are burning good too. Yeah, finally I will take some to a craft show in Dec and give the public a shot. Scary scary first for me. I read somewhere that candle making is an addiction to which I must say " I am a full fledged member". Someone here already said, it is cheaper than going to a therapy, I belive that too. And if I never ever sold one, I would still be a happy camper. Friends and family would get great gifts and I would be broke all the time.... but I love it. Keep the wax melting.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Welcome! I have only been doing this for about 9 months, but finding this web site was wonderful. I started out reading books, which helped some, but all of the books were geared towards paraffin, and I wanted to work with palm wax. I went to the archives and printed everything that I could find on palm wax. I probably printed off about 100 pages. I have a note book that I keep them in and everyday after work I would sit and read and then and then re-read. When I make candles, I have a spiral note book that I write everything in. Take notes, it is the best thing that you can do! Even when testing your candles write down everything. You will be surprised how much that is going to help you. I have finally perfected four scents. Everyone hear is wonderful and you will get great help. I have to thank Jakalex for help with my wicks, she was so sweet. Good luck to you!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheer up! Things will get worse.

I'd like to deal with the seam in your pillar candles. When making your second pour, the wax should just fill the center holes and the shallow crater in the bottom. It should not extend out to the mold, so you should never see a seam.

After cooling, the bottom should be levelled so the candle will stand straight.

Fredron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once, when my ex-husband complained to a friend about how much money I spent on my artistic pursuits, the friend asked him if I was on drugs, going to a shrink several times a week, running around on him or drinking heavily... The Ex said no to all four and the other guy told him, "Then you don't have sh*t to complain about, buddy!"

Probably shoulda married THAT guy instead!:laugh2::laugh2::laugh2:

:laugh2:

Maybe that is way he is now your EX husband. If your single now maybe go look that guy up, sounds like we all could use a DH like that.

I now resort to just not telling my DH what I buy (unless I spend a lot of money) and since I am at home when the stuff gets here he has no clue. But he did say the other day that he didnt realize I had so much candle stuff. :laugh2::laugh2::laugh2:

Antonia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Antonia, I've really run into a problem with that now that my DH is disabled and is home all day every day!! He now knows every single package that comes to the house--so I tell him advance to be expecting what I ordered. He doesn't complain, but I feel a little guilty when I have 3 orders come in in one week. I guess that shows that I'm buying a lot of it for my own personal fun instead of just for business!

Jane

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been selling container candles and soap for about 3 years now. I started with a candle making kit and made votives. That did ok with my friends and co-workers and I decided to move up to 8 oz jelly jars. Reading the boards at work and home became an addiction that drove everyone else crazy! I mostly sell my craft by word of mouth and have a couple of wholesale accounts that keep my business afloat and allow for my continued experimentation. I have yet to try pillars or sculpting wax...maybe some day. Find the closest supplier to your home and work out of that base for the majority of your needs. Have realistic expectations about your craft and don't shoot for candles that look like store bought candles. Remember that hand made/home made items are much more personal gifts that people like to give for special occasions.

Good luck,

Chuck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...