Jump to content

C6 wicking nightmare


 Share

Recommended Posts

Y'all I am at the end of my rope! I cannot find the right wick for my candles. For years I used 464 with a bit (10%) of coconut wax, however, I decided to stop using it for a number of reasons which aren't really relevant to the issue at hand. I live in Georgia so using TFC as my primary supplier makes sense since I can drive there and save on shipping. So a few months ago I decided to switch to C-6 (again, for a lot of reasons--lower FO, lower cost, demand for coconut wax etc etc etc). So I have been testing testing testing like crazy (and have asked about this previously here). I had to use glass jars to test while I was waiting for my custom jars to arrive from China. Now they're here and I cannot find a suitable wick. The jars are ceramic, straight sided and hold 11 oz. So far I have tried: ECO 12, ECO 16, HTP 104. HTP 105, and CD 12, 20 and 22. I spoke with someone at Candle Science, after their "wick finder" and test notes said to use CD24. They felt that a jar of my size would do best with the CD24 but were unsure to what degree the ceramic jar might make a difference since all of their tests are with glass. I ordered some CD24 which have not arrived but I am not optimistic based on my testing with other sizes. The whole CD series mushrooms like crazy and the residual smoke plume after blowing it out is terrible--there is tons of it and it lasts for over 60 seconds. Between the carbon and the smoke there's no way I can use these. The best performing wick so far has been the ECO 16 but it is clearly too small as there is a lot of residue on the side of jars. Unfortunately, ECO doesn't make a wick larger than 16 so I can't increase it. I've ordered a whole slew of other wicks to test (larger HTPs and a whole slew of Premier wicks) but I feel like I am just randomly throwing darts at a wall. I've mostly focused on testing wicks that I can get at TFC because I can pick them up the same day so I am less familiar with other brands, however, I'm certainly willing to test those too.

 

I would be grateful for any insight y'all might have. 

Thanks

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's NOT a huge jar--3 3/4" high by 3" diameter. When I talked to the folks at Candle Science they said it needs a larger wick than you'd normally expect. So far, my research and testing has confirmed that. When I tested smaller wicks such as HTP 104, 105 and ECO 12 and CD 12, the melt pool struggled to reach the sides and left a lot of residue.

 

IMG_20190823_094227.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How long per burn and how many burns did you complete? 

 

Ceramic vessels that are taller than wide hold a LOT of heat the further down it burns.  Likewise the air currents heat significantly the further down the container your get. 

 

Coconut wax does not need to reach a full melt pool, pretty much, ever. The fuel weeps down into a smallish, shallow melt pool producing a nice, clean scent throw.  Too hot and the balance throws it all off leaving plumes like you describe and potentially dangerous candles during the last third of the candle’s burn life. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adding one caveat: if you are using a fragrance that is damaging to wicks (like many vanillas, smoke, ambers, etc) different wick series and sizes will perform very differently. Some may fizzle as they burn. Some may flare. 

 

Speaking of flare, if you were burning and shortly during the first burn see what appears to be a tunnel, chances are your flame hit an air pocket, making it look like your wick is too small. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've tested them for 3-5 hour durations and different numbers of burns. Some went halfway down, some a bit less, none all the way to the bottom. In the case of CD wicks, the mushrooming alone was enough for me to pretty much rule them out before I got that far. I tried CD 12, 20 and 22 (all less than CS recommended) and the carbon build up was awful. It looked ugly and the mushrooms would drop in the melt pool and look even worse. I've tested several fragrances (lavender, black tea, grapefruit, and a woodsy blend a bit like the one you mention above).

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, TallTayl said:

Mushrooming is often caused by too big of a wick. Too hot, too much fuel, unable to fully combust = carbon build up (aka mushroom) 

Right, but even the CD12 mushroomed and that wick is 6 sizes smaller from what was recommended by the supplier. 😨 According to them, you have to wick up C-6. I have emailed the candle chemist at Cargill but, unfortunately, he is out of town for the next week. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Take online recommendations for wicks with a grain of salt.  Rarely, if ever, do they mean anything with our own candle systems.  

 

All waxes vary from lot to lot (sometimes box to box within the same lot). Coconut wax is no exception. Two cases of mine sitting side by side wick with entirely different wick manufacturer series, let alone size within a series. 

 

Wick down a size, another size if needed, and make good notes o the differences. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can get a hold of a few try the C60 or C62 cotton core wicks, try those.  They also make smaller sizes that may even work.  That jar is almost identical in size as one I have used with C3, I didn't find a whole lot of difference burning C3 and C6 except needing to wick down on some scents with C6.   I don't remember mushrooms but it's been a while and I will tolerate small ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Peggy T said:

Thanks. I poured some with several Premier wicks last night. Hopefully I'll be able to test them later today.

 

When I am testing my wicks, I usually make candle without a wick.  This way I can save a lot of time and resources.  Just stick them in there and switching back and forth.

 

20160817_211510.thumb.jpg.08516526d0276ca0fc02f40741466727.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/23/2019 at 5:10 AM, Peggy T said:

The best performing wick so far has been the ECO 16 but it is clearly too small as there is a lot of residue on the side of jars. Unfortunately, ECO doesn't make a wick larger than 16 so I can't increase it.

 

If you feel you need bigger than ECO 16, then this is how you can create bigger ECO wicks.  I made ECO 18 by combining ECO 10 & 8 shown in the picture.  ECO 20 can be made by combining 2 ECO 10s, and so on.  We are doing wick testings.  Don't be afraid to try under size, over size, any combination of wicks.  We will never know until we tried.

 

20190705_160300.thumb.jpg.3c94f7ec3b3bc07bc594a0e7b36f1500.jpg

 

20161021_121321.thumb.jpg.1bc56b076824d6987334afd8a05c7434.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, kandlekrazy said:

If you can get a hold of a few try the C60 or C62 cotton core wicks, try those.  They also make smaller sizes that may even work.  That jar is almost identical in size as one I have used with C3, I didn't find a whole lot of difference burning C3 and C6 except needing to wick down on some scents with C6.   I don't remember mushrooms but it's been a while and I will tolerate small ones.

Unfortunately, I can't find those easily after a (relatively short) search on google. I would be concerned to go with a wick that is difficult to find. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, BusyBee said:

When I am testing my wicks, I usually make candle without a wick.  This way I can save a lot of time and resources.  Just stick them in there and switching back and forth.

 

20160817_211510.thumb.jpg.08516526d0276ca0fc02f40741466727.jpg

I'm not quite sure I understand what you do. How do you stick a wick in here? Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try cd 18 wick ...might mushroom but gives a full melt pool...when my start mushrooming i just trim it with scissors while its burning , the piece i trim off stays on top of the scissors and just drop it in the sink ...I am a newbie ..so i hope this helps   

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, TallTayl said:

Honest question. Why is everyone so worried about a full melt pool so early on in coconut wax?

 

 Coconut wax is profoundly different from other waxes not really needing a full pool to outperform other waxes. 

My main concern is that a non-full melt pool could lead to tunneling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Coconut wax takes a longer time to solidify than other wax types. You can test fast after pouring but you will need to retest a couple of days later for wicks.  Coconut also does tend to leave film on glass compare to other waxes. Coconut blends all have to be tested with different types of wicks. You add anything to the wax it can really change how you wick it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...