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Advice on packaging and labeling needed


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I want to make some of my inked 8oz tureens to sell in a small shop on the gulf coast and I have a conundrum. Other than a safety label on the bottom I don’t want any label on the glass or lid; however, I have a bit of information that I want/need to pass on to the customer. I need to tell them the fragrance, care instructions for the container, and a little about myself. In this case I am the brand as they will be in the same shop as my photography and I branded that using my name. I don’t plan on selling a lot of these candles, at most a case a month, so if I spend a lot of money on packaging and printing it will take considerable time to recoup my cost. I suppose these will be what you call “high end” candles so the packaging needs to look nice. I’m really a newbie at this aspect of the business so any advice would be appreciated.   

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You could have a removable hang tag around the container. This could have your fragrance name and your messages to the customer as well. Then you could include a box or not depending on how much you want to spend on packaging. The hang tag is an affordable alternative that could add just the right look to your product.

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I agree with the hang tag idea. Boxes will be too expensive to print on all sides, which is what you would need for an upscale look. 

 

Do a folded hang tag with the scent and company name on the front, about you on the inside, and care instructions on the back. 

Im thinking either a simple elastic cord or leather cord tied in a simple bow or knot. 

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Flat boxes (that ship flat and you fold into a three dimensional box) are very inexpensive and look nice. You could even use black ones-either matte or glossy. And then you can put a label on the outside of the box. Keeps the candles free from debris/dust on the shelves. You can also buy even nicer hard boxes for a little more money. And you can put a card in the box with whatever info. you want. 

That is just an alternative to the hang tags. I also think you don't need to go cray-cray with a ton of info. Everyone knows that candles can cause fires if left unattended and they probably don't even care much about the fragrance name and ingredients, beyond the basics. Just my two cents.

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On 5/18/2019 at 7:49 PM, candlesinflorida said:

Flat boxes (that ship flat and you fold into a three dimensional box) are very inexpensive and look nice. You could even use black ones-either matte or glossy. And then you can put a label on the outside of the box. Keeps the candles free from debris/dust on the shelves. You can also buy even nicer hard boxes for a little more money. And you can put a card in the box with whatever info. you want. 

That is just an alternative to the hang tags. I also think you don't need to go cray-cray with a ton of info. Everyone knows that candles can cause fires if left unattended and they probably don't even care much about the fragrance name and ingredients, beyond the basics. Just my two cents.

Get outta my head, @candlesinflorida😂 You've said everything I was going to say. 

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On 5/18/2019 at 7:49 PM, candlesinflorida said:

Flat boxes (that ship flat and you fold into a three dimensional box) are very inexpensive and look nice. You could even use black ones-either matte or glossy. And then you can put a label on the outside of the box. Keeps the candles free from debris/dust on the shelves. You can also buy even nicer hard boxes for a little more money. And you can put a card in the box with whatever info. you want. 

That is just an alternative to the hang tags. I also think you don't need to go cray-cray with a ton of info. Everyone knows that candles can cause fires if left unattended and they probably don't even care much about the fragrance name and ingredients, beyond the basics. Just my two cents.

 

Am I wrong or are you suggesting that a warning label not be used on a flammable product like a candle? Also, my customers do in fact want to know what kind of candle it is they are purchasing and tend to select by scent name. I think it would be a mistake not to include this information and down right dangerous to consider selling a candle without a industry standardized candle warning label. If this is not what you had intended to suggest I apologize but I think you should probably clarify what you mean as that was my initial take from your post.

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You MUST have a warning label otherwise it’s a liability etc that you didn’t warn customer! 

Okay, hangtag or you can do a circle insert for top of candle. Add candle fragrance, and any other info.

What’s the width? There are large hole punches you can use. Make a template and print card stock, punch out larger circle, then

punch out smaller circle for wick.

Why not put a label inside the jar top!! Open and surprise, if you want a super clean look. Bottom recommend warning labels and name of fragrance so you don’t have everyone opening up candles.

 

 

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I wasn’t suggesting leaving it blank, but I am saying that a label doesn’t need to be overly crowded with information. I am more of a design minimalist. But you know your customers best. So if they are enthusiastic about details like what different top/base notes are in the scent, who made it, etc. then I’d say to put all the detailed info. For others, like when I buy a candle, I just sniff and decide if I like it..regardless of a cute name or what’s in it. As for the warnings, you’d have to consult a lawyer on what he/she thinks absolutely must be on your label. Not sure if any of us here are legal experts or just going with our legal assumptions?   Either the customer is using the candle in a dangerous way (their fault) or the candle maker created a dangerous product (chandler’s fault....Whether or not a warning label warned consumer)  I do think it is obvious that a candle is flammable and potentially dangerous and can burn down a house, regardless of a label. But I also think any company can be sued, regardless of whether the candlemaker reminded them that it is flammable and dangerous so no label will save an errant chandler.

Again, I am not an expert in negligience law-and I DO have those nifty little pics with the X’s on them on my labels and a little written warning about not leaving unattended etc. but I have bought candles that have very little warning info. on them and I don’t think the owners are worried about it.   

(And of course, I never leave my candles unattended...around pets or small children...etc. etc.)

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2 hours ago, NightLight said:

 

Why not put a label inside the jar top!! Open and surprise, if you want a super clean look. Bottom recommend warning labels and name of fragrance so you don’t have everyone opening up candles.

 

 

I like this idea! It would be cute to open up the candle, and there is a surprise. Maybe it could have the backstory of how the candle is made...or even a discount code to purchase another online or at a later date. I like the idea of having the info INSIDE because that way, the customer is already committed to the purchase and would want to know more about it, for sure.

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  • 2 years later...
On 5/9/2019 at 11:57 AM, Candybee said:

You could have a removable hang tag around the container. This could have your fragrance name and your messages to the customer as well. Then you could include a box or not depending on how much you want to spend on packaging. The hang tag is an affordable alternative that could add just the right look to your product.

 

Yes, hang tags, I forget about them and they can be a great idea depending on your product.

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On 5/21/2019 at 5:06 PM, candlesinflorida said:

As for the warnings, you’d have to consult a lawyer on what he/she thinks absolutely must be on your label. Not sure if any of us here are legal experts or just going with our legal assumptions?

 

Hi @candlesinflorida, hope things are going well for you. I haven't launched a business yet or started selling my candles so I may have the wrong impression but I believe if you follow the ASTM Standards for Candles and the National Candle Association's warning label requirements then you shouldn't need to consult with a lawyer, IDK. Something to consider for anyone else reading this thread.

 

https://candles.org/industry-standards/

https://candles.org/fire-safety-candles/read-the-label/

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