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I'm so confused about Fragrance Oil!


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Hi everyone. Okay, this is probably a very stupid question but I'm new to candle making. My first question is how much fragrance oil should I use for one pound of soy wax (some people suggested 7%?). Second, how does one measure the 7% of fragrance oil? do you measure it in a tablespoon (...is it 7% of a one ounce fragrance bottle) I'm so confused. Thanks everyone for your help!:smiley2:

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Guest meredean

I'll try to explain it tooo.lol like I usually use 10% so if I'm going to have 16oz of wax I do 16x 0.10 which =1.6oz so if you want 7% and you are using 16oz of wax it would go like this 16x0.07=1.12oz so however much wax ur using you x's that by the % you want. Atleast thats how I do it and everything has been fine..lol Hope to of helped alittle

Take Care,

Meredith

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My first question is how much fragrance oil should I use for one pound of soy wax
Check the specs for your wax first. Different waxes are formulated to hold differing amounts of FO.
Second, how does one measure the 7% of fragrance oil? do you measure it in a tablespoon
You do not measure ingredients for candles in terms of VOLUME (tablespoons, teaspoons, cups, fluid ounces, gallons, etc.), you measure in terms of WEIGHT (pounds, ounces, grams, kilos, tons, etc.). I use a graduated glass bartender's measuring glass. I set it on my scale, tare, then add the amount of FO that I need. For example, if I am using 1 oz. per pound of FO (roughly 6.25%), and I am mixing a two pound batch, for every pound of wax, I add 1 weighed ounce of FO. Because different FOs weigh different amounts, it is important to accurately weigh the ingredients and not rely upon liquid measure.

The percentage refers to the total amount contained in a candle. So if a candle has a 10% FO load, that means that 10% of that candle's weight is made up of FO.

There are calculators here and calculators and conversion sites online to help with the math. HTH :)

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The percentage refers to the total amount contained in a candle. So if a candle has a 10% FO load, that means that 10% of that candle's weight is made up of FO.

That part is correct.

So you must realize 1 oz FO added to a pound of wax isn't 6.25%. If you poured that you'd have a 17 oz candle containing 1 oz FO. That's 1/17 FO or 5.88%. Commonly stated as roughly 6%.

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I'll have to go check my spreadsheet to see if it is calculating inaccurately or I am remembering wrong. ;)

Regardless....it doesn't really matter. Top is technically correct, but the explanation gets pretty confusing for most. The difference is slight, and the only one on the face of the planet it matters to, is you, as the manufacturer of the candle.

Either way is fine, the important thing is that you ALWAYS do it the same way.

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Regardless of what wax you use...Always remember, there are two types of measurements, weight and volume.

When you make cookies you use volume, cups, teaspoons etc.

When you make candles and B&B you use weight, grams, pounds etc.

The confusing part is when you need to use ounces. There are fluid ounces and just plain ounces.

If you look at a can of Coke, or a bottle of juice, it says 12 fl. oz. Those are fluid ounces and are measured as volume. 12 fl oz of Coke is the same as 12 fl oz of milk is the same as 12 fl oz of gasoline.

When it comes to just plain ounces, those are weight. If you weigh one ounce of FO on a scale in a clear containeer, then do the same with milk, water etc, they will all have different volumes. The height of the fluid will be different for each one. Just as one gram or one pound are weights, an ounce is a weight.

Forget about measured volumes when working with candles. Just use weight. Watch closely that you realize the difference between fluid ounces and ounces.

HTH

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