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Poll: Curing Myth or Reality?


JacquiO
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Curing Myth or Reality? Should candles be cured?  

64 members have voted

  1. 1. Curing Myth or Reality? Should candles be cured?

    • Yes, Scented candles should be cured before burning.
    • No, candles smell the same regardless.
    • I don't really know. Haven't tested it out.
    • I don't really care. Make 'em and burn 'em as I please.


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I don't know if I was dreaming, wishing or what? But I remember when I first started making candles over 9 years ago I always read soy didn't need to be cured, but it had to be at least a day before lighting it. That is why I have always used it.... Is there a national candle making guideline that states it somewhere or ?????

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I believe that some people's wax blends, or choice of wax and fragrances do require a cure time in order to give a decent scent throw. I say bah humbug to that. If my fragrances don't throw in a candle that is freshly cooled, then that fragrance doesn't make my keepers list. I don't have the time nor the inclination to purposfully wait for my candles to smell good before I sell them. I use IGI 4627 wax, and Peaks, Wildfire, and Tennessee mainly for my fragrance oils. I didn't see a poll option that fit my scenario.

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The soy/par blend that I use for containers does better after some curing and some FOs need a longer curing period.

I've never bothered to let my paraffin candles cure but have been experimenting with some different FOs lately and have found that some become stronger (bloom) over time.

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The soy/par blend that I use for containers does better after some curing and some FOs need a longer curing period.

I've never bothered to let my paraffin candles cure but have been experimenting with some different FOs lately and have found that some become stronger (bloom) over time.

I have found that my paraffin candles become stronger after a couple of days or more.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am so glad I read this post. I've been battling what I thought was candle nose (and it still may be considering how much I've poured this weekend!) and was thinking my newer ones were duds. I just need to let them sit a bit. I did notice that Old Mill's 'Baton Rouge' came back stronger later on for me, so this is good.

Darbla

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  • 1 month later...

"SHOULD a candle be cured"

I can burn my candles within a day or two and I get great throw from them. BUT since my blend has soy in it, they do get stronger as they sit. There are some great scents that just take a few days to "bloom" in the wax and there are some that will throw as soon as the candle as set up. I think it is a personal preference on how your candles are. If you test one at day one level, day two level, day three level etc to compare the throw on it, you will find your own answer on how many days you feel is necessary before you sell your candles.

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I am always glad to see when people are questioning and testing the old maxims.

Personally I dont cure but then I dont sell either.

I have often wondered if the "curing" time has more to do with how our own scent receptors have begun filtering out that particular scent while we have been melting and pouring.

Yes, candle nose. I have worked in several places where the smell of curing foam or plastic is overpowering when I first started. After awhile none of us notice it. It's not until we have been on vacation for a week or two and go back in the plant and then we can smell it again.

Scent and our sense of smell is still somewhat of a mystery. Perhaps our sense of smell somewhat minimizes scents which we are exposed to, so long as they do not signify a threat to our survival and the time to regain that particular smell is different in all of us.

Perhaps it's the nose that needs curing and not the candles....lol

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Curing is something that should be done if you want the best finished product, IMO. Natural waxes especially, but all wax types can benefit from curing.

I agree with you, Teri! JMO~ I would never work with a wax or a scent that demanded two weeks cure time!:rolleyes2 My soy waxs needs cure time but only three to five days! As well as there are a few scents tha just don't throw in soy no matter the cure time!:lipsrseal

Fire

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