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Fractionated Coconut Oil vs Coconut Oil


KMommy
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You are pretty much right in your thinking. Here is some info on both copy and pasted from www.onederbar.com.

Fractionated Coconut Oil (Coco nucifera) NaOH SAP value .234

The steam distilled fraction of whole coconut oil, this component is also known by its INCI name of caprylic triglycerides. A remarkable oil, most consider it to have an indefinite shelf life. It is non-greasy and non-staining, and it can actually assist you in using less preservatives in your emulsions. We cannot say enough good things about this oil. It is naturally fractionated, is a deep carrier, is a medium chain acid completely saturated and free of double bonds, giving it its indefinite shelf life properties. Best of all: It is EXTREMELY cost effective and the best bargain of all the oils along with rice bran.

Coconut Oil 76 (Cocos nucifera) HaOH SAP Value: 0.19

Classic lathering agent in soap making formula, and also used to suspend botanical extracts like aloe.

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The term "double bond" is a term used in regard to the molecular structure of the oil.

Most oils used as carrier oils consist of "unsaturated" fatty acid triglycerides. This means they have one or more carbon-carbon double bonds in their long fatty ester side chains which are typically 16+ carbon units long. The double bonds in these side chains are susceptible to oxidation over time and their reactions with oxygen are what produce the rancidity. Virgin coconut oil has long unsaturated fatty acid triglycerides (which is why it is a solid at room temperature). Coconut oil is unique in that it also has a relatively high percentage of shorter length (C8, C10 ), completely saturated (no double bonds) triglycerides. Theses smaller fatty acid triglycerides are separated from the whole coconut oil to yield what is known as "Fractionated Coconut Oil." The process by which these smaller fatty acids are separated out is thru steam distillation.

HTH

If ya want to get really geeky, you can read this http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu./chemweek/fatsoils/fats&oils.html

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The term "double bond" is a term used in regard to the molecular structure of the oil.

Most oils used as carrier oils consist of "unsaturated" fatty acid triglycerides. This means they have one or more carbon-carbon double bonds in their long fatty ester side chains which are typically 16+ carbon units long. The double bonds in these side chains are susceptible to oxidation over time and their reactions with oxygen are what produce the rancidity. Virgin coconut oil has long unsaturated fatty acid triglycerides (which is why it is a solid at room temperature). Coconut oil is unique in that it also has a relatively high percentage of shorter length (C8, C10 ), completely saturated (no double bonds) triglycerides. Theses smaller fatty acid triglycerides are separated from the whole coconut oil to yield what is known as "Fractionated Coconut Oil." The process by which these smaller fatty acids are separated out is thru steam distillation.

HTH

If ya want to get really geeky, you can read this http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu./chemweek/fatsoils/fats&oils.html

I've been wondering this myself. Thank you for the explanation, I get it now.

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