Jump to content

464 & Beeswax


Recommended Posts

Do any 464 users add beeswax? I have searched all the threads on beeswax and nothing comes up on this particular wax other than a couple said it is NOT recommended. Even though I am overall pretty happy with this wax there has been some tiny issues I am still trying to per-fect. The reason I ask is I did a little experiment.... I added some to 2 different scents to see if it would help at all with how fast this wax burns down before burning out which has caused some of my wicks to drown out more often then I care for. So far it is going really well but wanted to know if there is some bad disadvantages I am not aware of. In what I have read about beeswax being hard I thought maybe just a touch would help harded the wax and slow the burn and strangly enough I dont have a mushroom either:confused:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I added some to 2 different scents to see if it would help at all with how fast this wax burns down before burning out which has caused some of my wicks to drown out more often then I care for
Soy & palm wax both burn down, then out. That is a property of them that is not undesirable, it just requires a different expectation when wicking. "Drowning" is an indication that your wicking isn't correct.

The main issue with mixing beeswax with soy waxes is that too much will cause the wax to be more brittle and increase the incidence of cracking. Play with the percentages to find the ideal blend that is just enough but not too much.

Edited by Stella1952
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If this helps I experimented with adding beeswax to my soy a while back. I was using CB135 at the time. I found 1-3% beeswax added to be a good blend. But 5% or more added I always got big cracks. Ended up using paraffin to make a parasoy blend instead so don't recall if the beeswax helped with the scent throw. But it did help make a smoother finish and nice smooth tops. I also liked the more opaque look I got with the melt pool instead of that deep murky muddied look straight soy gets when looking down into the melt pool.

A big reason I ended up not using it is its not very cost effective. Adding beeswax would have made me have to up the price of my candles and I didn't want to do that. So I settled with adding paraffin instead.

Edited by Candybee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Soy & palm wax both burn down, then out. That is a property of them that is not undesirable, it just requires a different expectation when wicking. "Drowning" is an indication that your wicking isn't correct.

The main issue with mixing beeswax with soy waxes is that too much will cause the wax to be more brittle and increase the incidence of cracking. Play with the percentages to find the ideal blend that is just enough but not too much.

Looking back at my notes- it seems the few that burn straight down fast and cause the wick to drown out are the ones that I fill the jar more up into the neck where it curves in... as far as wicking its very possible I dont have the right choice but when it happens in the same batch with a CD10, CDN10, CDN12 and a HTP 105 can I really be that far off in wick choice for them all to drown right out? and it doesnt happen with every scent. I only use the square mason 8 ounce and I never have tested higher than a 12 because the 10's can even get to hot for my comfort in some scents. I have tried 8's but they never have worked-way to weak. Now with adding the beeswax at 2% it seemed to help with this issue using the same FO and same wicks but I havent tested enough scents yet to be sure it will work every time....I dont know why I didnt just leave it alone - I have accomplished 15 Fo's in this wax straight and now I just gave myself another headache!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the few that burn straight down fast and cause the wick to drown out are the ones that I fill the jar more up into the neck where it curves in
So don't fill your container up that far LOL The excess initial heat in the smaller diameter area is producing too much liquid wax (not burning the melted wax quickly enough) which is drowning your wick.

This is a common jar and pretty easy to wick, so I have to think your overfilling is causing the drowning issues. I'd rather adjust that and see if it helps before I started down the slippery slope of additives... But, hey - if you like the beeswax addition and how it burns, then do what you wish, KWIM?

Edited by Stella1952
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If this helps I experimented with adding beeswax to my soy a while back. I was using CB135 at the time. I found 1-3% beeswax added to be a good blend. But 5% or more added I always got big cracks. Ended up using paraffin to make a parasoy blend instead so don't recall if the beeswax helped with the scent throw. But it did help make a smoother finish and nice smooth tops. I also liked the more opaque look I got with the melt pool instead of that deep murky muddied look straight soy gets when looking down into the melt pool.

A big reason I ended up not using it is its not very cost effective. Adding beeswax would have made me have to up the price of my candles and I didn't want to do that. So I settled with adding paraffin instead.

I agree- I bought this bag of beeswax a long time ago and thought it would be a good experiment but it will make the candle more expensive! I too love the look it gives and I used 2% added into 464- scent throw is great in the 2 FO's I have tried and although I never had a problem with smooth tops in this wax what I have noticed is with the beeswax added after each burn it hardens smooth- I dont have the crater look after each burn and it has helped with burning a little slower

Thank you for your input- paraffin is something I may venture into...I am afraid of it but very curious to!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

I do add beeswax to 464 and like some of the previous posts you do have to be careful with the amount you add to avoid your candles cracking & separating from jar. I typically add 2 TBS per pound of GB464. I have been doing this for years and I have not experienced any problems with burn quality or cracking.

Hope this helps you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

I do add beeswax to 464 and like some of the previous posts you do have to be careful with the amount you add to avoid your candles cracking & separating from jar. I typically add 2 TBS per pound of GB464. I have been doing this for years and I have not experienced any problems with burn quality or cracking.

Is that the secret in your ebook? Just wondering...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

I do add beeswax to 464 and like some of the previous posts you do have to be careful with the amount you add to avoid your candles cracking & separating from jar. I typically add 2 TBS per pound of GB464. I have been doing this for years and I have not experienced any problems with burn quality or cracking.

Hope this helps you!

Thank you so much for the info- I am liking it so far and will experiment with it a little more!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I may have to try some beeswax in my 464 now, does it help with frosting?

The ones I have made so far have not sat long enough to know yet- I don't generally see frost in my container candles until after at least a month and I dont color them so the ones that do get it are hardly noticeable. What I have noticed is after each burn the candle resets smoother, not so much crater look and white lines from where the melted wax met the solid- HT throw is great so far but not sure if the beeswax has any effect on that and the burn has slowed some- I am seeing not quite as deep of melt pool using the same wicks as 464 with no beeswax which I am hoping will eliminate some of the issues with some getting the container to warm half way thru

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I may have to try some beeswax in my 464 now, does it help with frosting?

464 did not just hit the streets yesterday - people have been working with it for years. Why not research the forum to see what users have had to say over time? Or better yet - TEST AND SEE for yourself! I predict that by the time you add enough beeswax to make a dent with the frosting issues, you will have added enough to make the wax brittle and crack.

The best way to control frosting in ANY soy wax is to PAY ATTENTION TO TEMPERATURE and technique (think tempering), use the least amount of FO you can and pay attention to the type/amount of dye you use.

Edited by Stella1952
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Researching this site suggests otherwise, that the addition of some beeswax does help with frosting. Tempering does seem to help but I can't control the weather and it seems that humidity plays a role in promoting frosting, so something else is needed to insure that a case or two of poured candles doesn't end up on the discount shelf. It also seems that a lot of soy wax is already sold with additives (464 is a good example) or people add their own (USA, CO, Crisco, coco wax, beeswax, paraffin). Or, just don't add color and hope no one sees the frosting. This tells me that raw soy wax is an imperfect product and needs some help. It's no different that basic paraffin wax in that regard by people adding stearic and vybar. I don't see the problem with adding a little BW to 464 but you are right, the best thing is to try and test it. If it fails, at least I can tell other folks here that it did fail based on my own experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 years later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...