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Cargill C3 question again :~)


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Here's a pic (didn't attach it because it attaches way to big), http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i170/workingmomathome/P7240199.jpg

of two C3 waxes with lx series wick in them. As you can see there are these bubbles that occur when melted and cooled (looks like someone spit in it, hehe). I thought it was the wick at first but I changed wick series and still happening and was wondering from those using C3 or ones that know what this could be, is it 'normal' of C3 or how I can get rid of it so it burns with no bubbles? TIA!

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I've tested about 12 fragrances in this wax and have only had this happen with one. It was a really heavy fragrance and I had it wicked too large. All the others look and burn great. Maybe too much fragrance load or too large wick?

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I have never had that happen to my c3 use containers, they turn out really nice and smooth and burn the same, how long do you all mix in the scent for, do you whip it or something? I pour my c3 way hot, are you pouring it cooler?

Do you add anything else to your C3? No, I stir slowly and pour slowly...tried different pour temps and results still the same with the bubbles. I pour at 180 now.

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I've tested about 12 fragrances in this wax and have only had this happen with one. It was a really heavy fragrance and I had it wicked too large. All the others look and burn great. Maybe too much fragrance load or too large wick?

I've only tested one fo which is creme brulee...maybe that has something to do with it, not sure. I have some warm apple pie waiting to cure longer before I burn and see what happens there. I've tried serveral different size wicks and 2 different series in this wax with the same results so I don't think the wick is the issue. What temp do you pour at and are you adding anything to the soy?

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Hi Silky! :)

I've tested this wax with creme brulee also and got the bubbles - lots of bubbles all around the edges of my container. This happened in several different containers too. I haven't gotten back to testing C3 with any other fragrance as of yet (went to a parasoy). I did some searches on this forum for this wax, and it sounded to me like some of the folks using it use the universal additive with it. I'm going from memory here, so I could be messed up on that... Maybe someone else will chime in and let us know about that for sure.

Lori

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Guest candelecandlecompany

About the additives. I don't use anything except a C3 and beeswax ratio. The only reason I use the beeswax is for the smoothness of the wax. I also pour much cooler than most and I don't get the bubles or leakage of scent or anything. Just took me 2 years of intense testing to get the formula right...whew.....glad that part is over.

As far as the frosting goes. I don't think that makes people not buy the candles. Someone I know is selling a major candle company's candles and all of the 15 candles she showed me are very frosted on the sides---very over priced I must say too. I just don't like the frost so that's why it took me sooo long to come up with a formula that doesn't frost much at all. Good luck in your trials...:)

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I've tried contacting Cargill and spoke to a sales rep who said the stick'ems were causing the air bubbles and then later said she didn't know, would call someone else and get back with me (uh, real reassuring she knew what she was talking about). I also spoke to Robert at Taylorered Concepts since I purchased the wax from him and he said bubbles are common in the C3 & not much can be done. I asked him about beeswax and he said he would recommend adding paraffin before beeswax to help with smooth tops. He didn't have any helpful suggestions other than to pour at a lower temp between 140-160 since I was pouring at 180. I've done the lower temp pouring but will keep playing around with that to see if it'll help. Funny thing is he was pushing his 50/50% blend saying you can call it soy wax since it's 51% soy. Who knows I may go to that but not just yet :grin2: . Candelcandlecompany would you be willing to share your pouring temp. at least?

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I talked to Donny over at Just By Nature today and we had a detailed discussion about C3. Long story short he didn't think I was doing anything wrong from what I was telling him and that it was typical to experience bubbles. He thought maybe I had a bad batch of wax...who knows. I'm going to keep trying on the C3...just bought another 10 lb. bag but did get some 402 & 444 samples in today. Going to be testing rrd and cdn wicks in the C3 as well to see if that makes a different but Donny felt it was my wax (which I think he's right...I've tested 2 different series of wicks and both have done the same bubbling). I told him what size I was using and he felt it was fine. He was pushing his blend too just like Robert at Taylored...kind of funny...just not ready to throw in the towel just yet :grin2: .

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Sure...I usually pour at about 120 for the C3--or a real slushy stage. Then stir up good right before you pour. let the candles cool themselves down. And whatever you do....Do not put them in fridge or freezer! They will definitely crack.

I know most people say to pour C3 hot but I have been playing with it for like 2 years now and that was what worked for me. I add the beeswax because I wanted to keep the wax as close to natural,,,besides the scent,,, as I could. (Our candles are totally colorless unless the scent tints them). My 2 year old has some respiratory problems so paraffin it totally out of the question! Sounds like the "parafin before beeswax" guy was pitching to you. Hope this helps!

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I have had the occasional "spitty" candle. It seems to happen more frequently as the candle burns down - hardly ever see this when burning the first few times. I have not noticed that it occurs in ALL the C3 candles we've poured - only a few. Seems to happen more with certain colors (tans are particularly affected). I have noticed that we see far less of this when we temper the wax prior to pouring. The actual pouring temp seems to make no difference. The more heavily dyed/pigmented candles seem more prone to this. I haven't made any association between a particular fragrance and the "rabid" appearance - the one we made that did it the worst was a medium tan candle scented with Maple Syrup FO poured into a mosaicked glass cup. That one bubbled so much, we were betting it was making a new life form in there!:P

Try using no dye and no fragrance oil, pouring at about 145 - 160 and see if the bubbling is diminished, then go from there. ;)

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You maybe onto something. My beginning test candles were tan/brown and scented with creme brulee. Mirrors your maple syrup one. I've been only making ones with FO and no dye and have already noticed less bubbles but wasn't sure since it was harder to tell with just white. C1 wax has not bubbled on me once but its throw is pretty much doesn't exist with the FO I'm using. Good idea on no dye & fo...will try that next, thanks!

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