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Mass Producers?


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So, you have poured 200 jars and you need to prepare them for labeling. There is some oily/waxy residue on the jars from handling etc.

What do you use to wipe your jars off with to make sure your product is pristeen clean, sparkling and ready to package?

So far I have tried Baby Wipes, Alcohol, Windex, Paper Towels, Towels......seems like there must be a better solution. I am very careful when I pour however the whole process lends itself to wax/oil everywhere (which is one of the reasons we love getting our hands in it right?) BUT, I know everyone wants their final product to be clean...free of residue and fingerprints.

Any miracle solutions?

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Thank goodness my jars dont show up the little stuff! I just use paper towels to take the "overpour" from the candles. If I wanted to clean up another type of jar I think I would use the wipes that have orange cleaner in them. I use them to clean off the scales and they really cut the wax. You would still need to use a paper towel after the wipe. There are cheap orange wipes and not soo cheap ones, the better ones have more "stuff" on them and clean better then the dollar store ones. HTH Bruce

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This really doesn't answer the question you posed. Nor am I a mass producer, but I have an idea...

To prevent further fingerprints, maybe wear some nitrile or latex gloves while cleaning them. Some gloves are textured for extra grippy power. They'd be easier to discard than wiping/cleaning hands as needed.

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I have an assembly line lol. My candle studio is set up into "areas". The candles are poured and then go to a cooling area. Once they are cooled they get first of all touched up, and then cleaned up. In the touch up section the wicks get trimmed and the tops get zapped if needed. At this time the heat gun and a paper towel can be used to get wax off of the rims etc.. After the touch ups they go down the line and get a good cleaning. All I use is a pan of warm soapy water. I don't use soy wax, but warm soapy water does a nice job on my jars with whatever wax is left on them from the pour process. Once the containers are clean and dry they are all set to label. My jars for wholesale have four labels now because of the bar codes so this is a whole other assembly line LOLOL I love lots of help and lots of room now, or I'd never be able to do it.

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With 100% soy, I just use a dry, clean washcloth. Works like a charm. If there's a dribble of wax on the side of the jar. I use a knife to scrape it off and use the dry cloth. It's the bottom of the jars that I have to clean with care because my warning label goes on the bottom. MY label with my info goes on the side. With soy, it very easy cleanup:wink2:

Fire:cool2:

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Yep, I do this too,,,;)
I think I first heard about mineral spirits from you.

It stuck in my mind and eventually I researched it more. I found out odorless mineral spirits is less strong than the smelly petroleum solvents, but still very effective and safer. I also discovered that art students use it (arts schools don't even allow turpentine and such these days) and art supply places have some of the highest quality stuff . The one I've been using is called Gamsol.

Breanna is good at figuring out what works and sticking with it. If you're doing the same thing she is, you're probably a-OK!

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Good question :rolleyes2

Since my work area i limited I was also wondering about cleaning issues from other candlemakers.

RIGHT NOW I am a GLASS PLUS fan and cheap paper towels

Does anyone have to wipe out the top inside edge of their jars is my question.

Clean up take awhile??????????? for anyone else ?????????

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I do mass produce and what we use is tissue paper, not like kleenex or TP but regular old tissue paper and not rubbing alcohol but denatured alcohol. We do this as we're putting the containers back in the original cases to go over to packaging for individual packaging.

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Yep, Brooke. I do have to clean the inside edge of the container. I have worked very hard to find a method for cooling my containers slowly, and even though the finished result is a nice flat surface....the wax I am using does "settle" leaving a tiny, thin "line" approx 1/4 inch above the surface which is barely visable to anyone but me:rolleyes2 I can't stand it, so using my index finger and a paper towel wrapped tightly around my finger, I clean the inside of the container. I do not use anything on the PT to clean this area with.(It is a nice soft wax) I have had people look at my candles after they were cured and tell me they thought this step was a waste of time.....but I just can't let them leave without it.

HTH

M

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I've pretty much used 409 and a clean kitchen dishtowel. But hauling to shows and the finger prints there from the handeling keeps me busy with windex wipes. Would be nice to find a way to shine them up and have them repel fingerprints...

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