Ash44

Naturewax C-3 Adhesion Issues

7 posts in this topic

Hello Everyone! I am new to the website and love the info and feedback in the community - I am hoping to get a little guidance with this wax I love so dearly but drives me insane with the adhesion problem. This wax is supposed to have excellent glass adhesion when poured at the correct temperature. I am using 8 oz Square Mason jars. No pre-heating. I have thought to preheat but my oven doesn't go low enough and a heat gun does such an uneven job I worry about that being an issue.

 

I heat to 185* add FO slowly. I have done this and poured slowly at 120*, 125*, 135*, 160* and 165*. I have had TOTAL pull away all the way around with every pour except 165* just a bit around the jar where it begins to curve (after 7 days of curing). The candle sits on a cloth or paper towel with room temperature always between 71*-75*. I am almost ready to switch waxes but I LOVE everything about this wax I just need to get jar adhesion down and make this a one pour job.

 

Any further tips and tricks/advice is greatly appreciated!

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Sometimes that happens to me with 464 and when I used C3 also.  I just embrace it when it happens.  The normal customer doesn't notice.  All they want is a great smelling candle.  I think we can be so hard on our selves.

 

Trappeur

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Just now, Trappeur said:

Sometimes that happens to me with 464 and when I used C3 also.  I just embrace it when it happens.  The normal customer doesn't notice.  All they want is a great smelling candle.  I think we can be so hard on our selves.

 

Trappeur

 

Yes! I completely agree - thing is.. I previously used 100% Midwest soy wax by American Soy Organics and they came out perfectly. However I had to use more FO to get the HT I needed and are not AS aesthetically pleasing as C3. I am ok with that but if I can get C3 to behave nicely *haha* I will be super happy with the best of everything. Midwest spoiled me with the beautiful adhesion...

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This is the way I look at.  Every wax...I don't care which one it is has its quirks.  If you master the correct wicking for your wax and find the best fragrances that rock in your wax, and through all your testings are very happy with the proper safe candle you've created then I consider that a winner.  You can always smooth out your tops of candles with a nice repour or heat gun....no problem.... Next time your out and about stop and look at the candles in the shops or grocery stores and take a look at them.  Look at the wet spots, look at the frostings on jars, look at the ugly cottage cheese unsmooth tops,look at the unadhesian of candles made...  even look at the uncentered wicks....they are all there and out there.  Get your wicking down first......Do all your burns and power burns....Finalize your fragrances that you are happy with.   Some fragrances just won't work in your wax.....you can wick up and can wick down and they still don't work....Well, pitch that fragrance and move on!  Try another one from another company and somewhere out there you'll hit your mark.   Sure we all want that flawless candle. So youve perfected a candle  and love the fragrance and it is a thrower but now you see some wet spots that seem to come out of no where...nothing you can do about it...it's just a characteristic trait of soy...accept it as believe me, no one is going to give 2 bits about it.   Once they get it home and burn it and love it, you've made your impression....And do you think once they blow it out and see that the top of the candle is not a slick shiny smooth finish but an ugly maybe cottage cheese top they are going to sit there and ponder over it?   Heck no!  It won't even be a conversation over the tops. They will be coming back for more to buy.  

 

I used c3 for years and love that wax and like I said it too has it quirks and yes I had made jars that the wax didn't adhere to the glass at times and would get so frustrated but after awhile I over looked it.  Usually when it was cool it was when I saw that problem arise but a great looking label camoflauged that problem.  And there is no guarantee that if you can lick these little problem that you dispeize, there is no guarantee that once the candle is received on the other end that the adhesian has come about and it left your hands perfectly in your eyes.  So don't sweat the small stuff.  This is my opinion.

 

Trappeur 

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Thank you for the time you spent on your response! I have looked at other candles in retail stores and I absolutely already understand everything you've said. Since I was able to "perfect" the 100% Midwest wax, I would like to do the same with C3. Granted it may not be possible and it's not the end of the world however, the purpose of my post here was to gather tips and tricks from others based on what I have already done (I described to the best of my ability what I have tried). It really isn't just about what the customer sees (honestly, I don't think they even notice it - I know I didn't before I started making candles - it's more for my own personal satisfaction).Thanks again!

 

Best,

 

Ashley

Edited by Ash44

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It's true that many candles aren't going to be flawless ... and some "flaws" are simply part of the candle. 

 

I have used GW415, 444, and 464, but I've never used C3.  When I make candles that do not develop any air pockets between the glass and the wax, I'm very happy.  However, I've yet to exactly figure out what really makes the difference, as it could be a variety of things. 

 

The only thing I can offer is this tip, which sometimes works and other times causes more problems and you're better off with the wet spot.  I have done it successfully, however, so you can see if it works for you.  I lightly use a heat gun on the wet spot, which I'm pretty sure some others do also now and then.  If it's a big one, you'll see the air pocket rise to the top of the candle, which messes up the surface.  I do a light (shallow) repour and cross my fingers that the spot will not turn up again when the candle cools -- if it does, then that candle must "supposed to have one" I guess!!  :)

 

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