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Vybar in Container Palm Wax


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I was wondering what experiences are with using Vybar or other additives in Palm Wax for container candles (Glass Glow 2322). I've tried Vybar 103 before at 1/4 tsp and it seems to reduce the crystallization effect, but I don't remember having air bubbles or air pockets as much.

My latest issue is that all of my 4 recent candles I made and allowed to cool very slow-- all had giant air pockets in them and put themselves out within a matter of minutes by burning down into a nice crater down the middle of the candle.

So -- my idea is to try the Vybar 103 again, OR to make a metal lid that with a hole punched in it to hold the wick and also some more holes/slots to punch some relief holes in it while cooling.

Has anyone had similar experiences and can offer some advice?

This round -- Pure container palm wax was heated to 205/210 and dye was added, reduced heat to 200 and added fragrance, poured at 200 into jars that were preheated to about 170. Popped them in the oven (unheated) to try to cool evenly without any drafts. Did not punch any relief holes as I have not had to do this in the past, but this time the end result was lots of air pockets.

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My very best suggestion is for you to make best friends with the search tool and read about palm wax. None of this is news to palm wax chandlers.

Air trapping is a characteristic property of crystalizing palm waxes. There are two ways to mitigate the air pockets in Glass Glow. One way is to allow the candle to cool on top, then invert the candle. The idea is the air bubbles will rise and be trapped at the bottom of the candle where they will supposedly do no harm. I do not like this method because it does not remove the air pockets. I use the second method - wrecking. When the candle gets a layer of wax hardened on top, I cut this out and push it deep down into the liquid center of the candle where the air traps are forming. I do this at intervals until there is no more liquid center. The roughened top is then finished with a heat gun. This has been discussed extensively in previous threads that you can locate with the search tool (the Google site search works best). Use "wrecking" as your search term and you will come up with many threads. Just poking a few holes is not sufficient.

Before using any additive, you first have to know why you are using that additive and the particular purpose of the additive. Vybar is not for use with vegetable waxes and it is not used to mitigate air traps.

There is such a thing as overheating palm wax and keeping it TOO hot for TOO long. Heat IGI R2322A to 200°F, add prewarmed FO and pour between 185°-195°F for best crystallization. It helps to hit the containers inside with a heat gun just prior to pouring but this is not necessary except when the room temperature is very cool. Cooling in your oven is a great idea. In cold weather, I usually prewarm the oven to about 150°F & turn it off just before I put the candles in to cool. Good luck & have fun! :)

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Pixie, while "relief" work is necessary for palm wax, the holes must be a lot larger with palm wax than for soy or paraffin. The reason is because there is a very short interval between the solid and liquid states of palm wax. It pays to not only poke the hole, but to "sir" deep into the cooling candle, which wrecks the top from the wick to about 1/4" of the sides, which gave rise to the term "wrecking." So long as one accomlishes this neatly without splattering wax on the sides of the container, etc., a heat gun finishes the top beautifully.

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  • 3 years later...

I have tried the relief holes and it works fine for me. I typically make 2-3 small holes, I use a wooden shish kebab stick, then I slowly pour a small stream of wax into one of the holes to force the air out of the other hole. The holes should be on opposite sides of the candle and try to pour continuously until full again. May require a bit of smoothing but if youre patient in your pour you can get it looking nice with little effort. Hope this helps.

Edited by ksmzao
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I have tried the relief holes and it works fine for me. I typically make 2-3 small holes, I use a wooden shish kebab stick, then I slowly pour a small stream of wax into one of the holes to force the air out of the other hole. The holes should be on opposite sides of the candle and try to pour continuously until full again. May require a bit of smoothing but if youre patient in your pour you can get it looking nice with little effort. Hope this helps.

This is a 4 year old thread, but let me take the opportunity to point out that you don't need to punch holes in Glass Glow. Wait until a thick crust of wax has hardened on top, the turn the candle upside down. That eliminates the voids that open up around the wick when you first light the candle. The top remains perfect.

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  • 2 months later...

I no experience with polymers (Polyboost or Vybar) & palm - but we do have people use it with paraffin and parasoy blends.  These polymers are a crystal modifier - tends to act like a microcrystalline wax on steroids.  Firms up wax, binds fragrance -etc.  It might work fine with palm - i just don't know from personal experience.

 

HTH

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