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novice, "one pour" wax shrinking, second pour?


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I am pretty new to making candles and trying to "perfect" my results. Well, okay, trying to get better at it. I make exclusively 6.5 oz container candles -- glass jars.

I am using what is sold as a one pour wax, and I am pouring at the recommended temperature (160 degrees). I am cooling as slowly as I can (I group the candles together and cover them with a box). I still get a concave candle.

I have taken to saving some of the dyed, scented wax, re-heating it to the pour temperature, and topping the candle off -- filling the indentation (which can be pretty significant) back up with wax. I only get to work on these for a little while in the evenings, so the candles have sat for 22 hours before I do the second pour. Am I on the right track? Is there any danger in doing this?

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Yes, please tell us the wax, is it really a "one pour" or a "low shrinkage wax"? I've used 6006 which is a low shrinkage type and was amazed how how uneven the tops were.

I use what is supposed to be a one-pour wax but sometimes I have to do either a 2nd pour or hit the candle with the heat gun to level out the top - probably has to do with ambient temps. (If I have to tweak the top of the candle to level it out it's no biggie to me.)

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I am using IGI 4636 from lonestarcandlesupply.com. The shrinkage is so extreme that I am thinking of trying to find a different supplier. That's why I'm looking around and asking questions.

This is a parafin wax. Their instructions say one pour. Now that I look more closely at their website, it calls it "low-shrink" wax.

Two questions, then. With the second pour, will the candle burn properly (that is, am I doing it correctly such that the candle will burn properly)? Is there any such thing as a true one-pour wax?

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Hubby bought me a heat gun off the snap on truck when he was towing but you can get them anywhere I believe peak candle sells heat guns if I remember correctly or you can buy one just about anywhere. Or just use a hairdryer but I find they take to long and they blow so hard and don't heat fast enough that I have wax flying everywhere. Sorry I'm no help with your wax I've never used it

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I am using IGI 4636 from lonestarcandlesupply.com. The shrinkage is so extreme that I am thinking of trying to find a different supplier.

Lone Star is a supplier, not a manufacturer. IGI has a website where you can read all about the different waxes they make. You may want to test of of the other IGI container formulas they sell for making containers... 4636 isn't the only one, ya know... ;)

Is there any such thing as a true one-pour wax?

Sure there is, but technique has a little to do with it, too. If you are cooling the candles unevenly or too rapidly, you're going to have problems with a one-pour wax, too.

Edited by Stella1952
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My first heat gun was a Harbor Freight and didn't last long. Then DH got me a Milwaukee and that one is really great. I think he got it at Lowes.

I use this wax and find it only sinks slightly on top. I generally heat my wax a lot hotter, about 185. You may actually be not going warm enough. Here is a helpful link: http://www.candlewic.com/candle-wax/PDS-J50.pdf

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All wax is going to shrink, some way more than others. So I guess the "low shrink" rating is a subjective term. The cooler you pour it, the less it will shrink because the wax expands as temp goes up.

You mentioned a concave top and asked about safety. I hope you are anchoring your wick and using a wick holder at the top to keep the wick from being drawn down in the shrinkage. I think for safety if you don't use a wick holder that secures the top of the wick, it will draw down with the shrinkage and burn improperly. On my multi-pour candles, the wick forms a convex cone in the center of the concave shrink area and I just fill that in with a second pour.

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I use lonestar as my wax and some of my scents. I use the vegetable wax, the ecosoya pillar blend and the CB-135. I do get shrinking a lot in the pillar blend I have just come to think this is normal and expect it. I use lonestar cause the are close. I want to check out a heat gun I have used a blow dryer.

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You could try pouring your initial pour at a lower temp, to lessen shrinkage... that might make a difference? Also, I don't think your second pour will effect the actual burn of your candle, the trick will be in the appearance & making your join line as "invisible" as possible. It's all in the experimentation! Working through "theories" until you find what exactly works for you =)

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