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I'm using Astorlite F palm wax and the color is dark in my melting pot, but when I pour and it hardens, it gets SO light! The crystal effect is beautiful, but I want a distinct color difference like I see in a lot of other candles online. How much color block would you put in for a batch of 8 votives? (1 lb of wax)

Also, even though I poke holes near the wick, I still get small holes that appear on the candle top. What's going on?

I hope someone can help.

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Hello,

I was just going to post the same question about the holes at the top.I've tried repours,Looks really tacky.My husband was looking at a Palm pillar that I had made,He put his thumb into it.It went right through the bottom,the inside was hollowed.

I'm still learning about palm..I have never seen anything like that before,makes me wonder about the rest I made. Would the Steric Acid recommended for the palm wax prevent that from happening again?

And about that color,I've noticed I have to use a lot more pigment dye for the palm.Maybe using the liquid pigments would suit that wax best.Wicking that wax is completely different.What worked for parrafin wax hasn't been working for the Palm,even though I'm using the same molds as before.

Anyone else have the same issues?

Thanks,

Munky :)

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About the air trapping, if y'all will search the forums for that term, MUCH has been written on this topic. It is a characteristic of palm wax.

As far as coloring palm wax, I don't use solid dyes so I wouldn't know what to tell you about those. What I CAN tell you is that because of the crystal pattern of palm wax, it is difficult to get a handle on the shade, even when doing the "drip test." My best advice is to keep track of how much you are using and make sure you are several shades darker on the "drip test" than you want and hopefully, it'll end up right. HTH :)

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First, let me say I'm still in the playing stage with candles in general and palm wax specifically.

I've worked on the trapped air two ways - one was what Stella spelled out in great detail in another thread, and the second was to do relief holes. But what I'm finding with the relief holes is that when I refill them I get holes in my holes if you KWIM!!! So I'll stick with the method of smooshing down the inside even tho it's messier for me!

As for color, I'm using liquid (Peak's) and find I really have to figure each color out individually. I used the colors as directed to get a lime green and it was way to dark. Did the same for a Christmas Tree scent to get hunter green and it's way too light... It's gonna take some experimentation... Sigh.

Soap is more simple...

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I don't know if there is a difference in color blocks or liquid dyes or not. I would assume there is some. We use the liquid color dyes and they work great in our palm wax so far. Occasionally we do get air pockets but only a few real gurglars.(we make palm container candles.....haven't been brave enough to try pillars yet.) I think Stella can give you a real good heads up on palm pillars along with some other really knowlegable folks that make palm pillars.

Mike

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So I'll stick with the method of smooshing down the inside even tho it's messier for me!

That's where I was at with the relief holes - the stuff that stuck to the bamboo stick and all the poking made more mess than the eventual technique I stumbled on which was carefully cutting out a circle of cooled wax from the top with a sharp knife so I didn't make such a mess. Still looks kinda rough when finished, but more stays in the candle than all over the place.

CareBear, I drip about a teaspoonful onto the depression under an aluminum can (they are always around...). If I can WAIT to let it cool instead of blowing on it (:whistle:), the color is a LITTLE more true... The more you make palm, the more you will understand how to "figger" the colors. It doesn't take nearly as much as does soy for vibrant colors, but getting the value (shade) just right can be a challenge... the size of the crystal pattern really affects the appearance of the color, too.

Just remember that as the seasons change and our temperatures are varying more toward the cool side, palm will begin acting up more...:rolleyes2

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My husband was looking at a Palm pillar that I had made,He put his thumb into it.It went right through the bottom,the inside was hollowed.

Don't feel badly, WaxMunkey - I have had that unhappy experience and it is SO disheartening!! A beautiul candle with a cave-in...:embarasse:waiting: Search the forums for "air-trapping" and there's a buncha suggestions and tips folks discussed for you to read and try on for size. Thumping the container as the candle is setting up helps a lot. If you are pouring into art molds, there are predictable places on nearly any given shape where air bubbles tend to collect. So at least now you know where to suspect they may be lurking... ;)

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Thanks all for all the helpful advice!,

I've been scouring the Forums in between pours today.Getting the problems narrowed down to where I've found out that It's the wick size ( it's burned a hole straight down the middle,left huge sides and never has reached the edge),I poured 2 more today,as I went along I went back and poked relief holes around the wick.Funny though,reading after I thought to do that,I should have been doing that all along!:P

You were right Stella,after leveling my rejects from yesterday there has been a predictable pattern :)

So all there is to do.... (Correct me if I'm wrong)

Poke relief holes often.

Invest in liquid dyes/steric acid

Keep hubby out of my kitchen :rolleyes2

You guys have been great,thank you again for all the helpful advice :)

Munky.

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I used to use palm wax. I would make relief holes with a wooden spoon handle, then kept them open. I would then do a repour and almost fill the holes. Then, when that was cool, I'd pour some more over the bottom of the pillar and spread out the wax with a skewer just to the edges. By taking enough time and being careful to make and maintain the relief holes you can make some great palm pillars without air cavities.

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Keep hubby out of my kitchen :rolleyes2

I thought that was a UNIVERSAL LAW... :laugh2:But better it happened with HIS thumb than a customer's! :shocked2: I deliberately press all over the bottom and sides of palm candles to be sure no caverns got past me... quality control at it's crudest!:laugh2:Sure does p*ss me off when one caves...

Wicking palm pillars requires you to make a decision. If you are trying to make the pillar burn using 100% of the wax, you are in for a struggle because palm wax is so very different from paraffin or soy. Best to burn palm candles wicked in this manner in a bowl 'cause they are most likely gonna make a mess.

BUT if you embrace its tendency to form a shell and deliberately wick the pillars to leave a thin (1/4") shell, not only will it be less wicking headache, but you will have a nice shell into which you can put a tealight for continuing enjoyment. :) I use CDN14s for 3" pillars.

I opted for choice #2 as I was scraping the wax off the TV and speakers.:rolleyes2 Seemed that the bowl overflowedeth...:laugh2:

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