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primed wick inconsistencies


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I'm about 8 months new to soy candles and have lots of questions about wicking. I'll try not to ramble on too much. Okay, here we go, please bare with me. :embarasse

Is there anyone that believes that a wick primed with a high 212 mp paraffin would burn different than a wick primed with 150 mp beeswax or even soy. I have done burn tests using the same wick size and series from different suppliers side by side, same wax formula, and have got different results. Maybe it's just my imagination. I'm leaning more and more toward priming and tabbing my own wicks anyway so I know more of what I'm working with and hopefully get more consistent results.

I am currently using the LX series with my 415 with fo at 6-8% and no dye in various containers. So far I am pretty happy with the burning characteristics with the LX and so far my only complaint is the scent throw hasn't been very good but that doesn't mean that it's because of the wick.

Recently I've been overwhelming myself and making myself crazy with nitty gritty wick details and what makes one differ from another. For some reason I've been wanting to try the CD's. Correct me if I am wrong but is the difference between these two wick series that the LX is a flat braided cotton wick with cotton stabilizing yarn threads that burns with less curling and the CD is a flat braided cotton wick with paper stabilizing filament woven in that burns with more curling? If this is the case, does the all cotton LX burn hotter than the cotton/paper CD? Is it the actual "wick size" not so much the wick series/type that makes it burn hotter or cooler? Is there a better more suitable wick type for pure soy and scent throw?

Sorry for all the questions, maybe I'm causing too much stress for myself and taking this candle hobby too serious. I should stick with what is working and change it when it's not working? TIA for any advice and or opinions on this topic.

:confused: OMG, I think I need to find a wickaholics support group!!!

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There's hardly any wick that people don't use in soy. Test as many different kinds as you feel motivated to test, find the best size for your candle in each one and proceed according to which results you like the best. There's no right answer for what to use -- totally up to you.

The wicks with the paper fibers have a higher temperature inside the flame, which helps them burn stuff more completely. In theory this can be useful with hard-to-burn fuels like veggie waxes. There are other variables though and you can get good results with a variety of wick types.

When you buy wick assemblies from different suppliers your results can vary. The wick itself is usually exactly the same, so it's probably due to the type of coating and how it's applied. That's typically done by a supplier or distributor rather than the wick manufacturer. Candlewic for instance offers your choice of priming waxes and they do say that the extra high MP coating affects the burn.

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Thanks for your reply Top, you helped me to calm down a bit. I just get worked up and confused from time to time when it comes to wicking. I guess thats the name of the game. I'll be patient and continue testing until I get the type of results that I'm looking for.

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This is JMO, but I wasn't crazy about LX wicks and I really don't like CD's either. The CD's burned hotter, but the candle didn't last as long. They both shroom badly and the LX leaves a bit more droppings than the CD's. My results have been in soy wax, so it may vary. I'll be the first to join your WAA group if you start one! I still haven't found the "perfect wick!" So far I like the cottons the best, but I still haven't tried them all!!

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BTW if you want to eliminate that variability with the wick assemblies, you can buy raw spooled wick and just tab it without any priming wax at all.

I've been tossing this idea around for a while now, making my own wick assemblies to eliminate variables. If I was to make my own wick assemblies without priming would the only lost benefit be rigidy? Is there other benefits to a primed wick? Besides, if the wick is not primed, it will be as soon as you pour your wax anyway right?

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This is JMO, but I wasn't crazy about LX wicks and I really don't like CD's either. The CD's burned hotter, but the candle didn't last as long. They both shroom badly and the LX leaves a bit more droppings than the CD's. My results have been in soy wax, so it may vary. I'll be the first to join your WAA group if you start one! I still haven't found the "perfect wick!" So far I like the cottons the best, but I still haven't tried them all!!

Thanks KK for your input on LX and CD wicks. Every bit of input and information helps. We are all looking for those "specific" burn results and only individual testing will help one decide what they are willing to accept or not. What a journey huh?

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Priming the wicking plus making your own assemblies adds up to a big PITA. At that point I'd sooner choose a consistent source of assemblies and buy them.

Personally I've found the unprimed wicking works fine. The containers I make are poured hot enough to clobber the wick wax anyway, but the popular wick types seem rigid enough on their own.

The only caveat is that I haven't tried it with soy wax. Back when I tested veggie waxes I was using primed assemblies. At typical soy pouring temps the wick coating might actually survive and contribute something. Soy candles tend to have a thick layer of soft mush beneath the melt pool so maybe the coating helps.

You could give it a go and see. I bet it works.

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Priming the wicking plus making your own assemblies adds up to a big PITA. At that point I'd sooner choose a consistent source of assemblies and buy them.

Personally I've found the unprimed wicking works fine. The containers I make are poured hot enough to clobber the wick wax anyway, but the popular wick types seem rigid enough on their own.

The only caveat is that I haven't tried it with soy wax. Back when I tested veggie waxes I was using primed assemblies. At typical soy pouring temps the wick coating might actually survive and contribute something. Soy candles tend to have a thick layer of soft mush beneath the melt pool so maybe the coating helps.

You could give it a go and see. I bet it works.

I agree with you, I could see how self assembling could be a PITA.

Based on the fact that there is such a huge market for candle wicks, it occurred to me that quite possibly priming probably originally started for the ease of tabbing and for the ease of cutting the wick to various lengths for packaging. I would think that in production, it would slow things down without the primed coating. Just a thought...

I often ask myself, what have I gotten myself into!!! I'm not complaining, a good challenge can be fun and this hobby is definitely a challenge.

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