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Well the one-pours would have all the additives in it, depending on what kind of wax it was for would depend on what's been added. The regular waxes allow you to tinker with your own mix of additives. All of them will need UV, because that's the only additive not in any of the waxes.

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What is the difference between one pours and those that aren't, (besides the obvious pouring difference), do the one pour waxes "give up" something else in order to be one pours? Just curious really.
Leaving out anything involving vegetable derived ingredients, I can think of 4 kinds of container waxes:

One pour waxes are specially formulated to simplify candle manufacture. With the right process and container you can avoid getting sink holes and air pockets on the first pour. They're also designed for high fragrance loads and some of them have exceptional glass adhesion too. The trade off is that the additives can make them hard to burn and more prone to soot and mushrooming.

Multi-pour container preblends are fully formulated with additives but require 2 pours to get a flat top because they shrink more. These are also designed for high fragrance levels. Without the large amount of low-shrink additives, they have a harder texture than the one pour blends. A good example is IGI 4786 "Classic Blend".

Next are scale waxes, which are semi-refined straight paraffins with no additives and some residual oil. They're an ingredient in the previous two types and can be used to "roll your own" container blend. You can use them straight for special effects - even with no fragrance oil they get very mottled and bubbly on top. With additives I've made everything from one-pour waxes to votive blends using these.

Finally there are fully refined straight paraffins with melt points from just below to just above 130. You can use them with no (or minimal) additives to make mottled containers and votives. You can also add a variety of additives for a smooth look and more fragrance retention.

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Finally there are fully refined straight paraffins with melt points from just below to just above 130. You can use them with no (or minimal) additives to make mottled containers and votives. You can also add a variety of additives for a smooth look and more fragrance retention.

Actually, fully refines straight parrafin can be had in anything from the 120s to the 160s+ -- not sure where the 130 "just below just above" thing came from.

To say something that most folks here don't to hear is this: blends are pretty much a scam. They are less work, but they often cost a lot more than straight waxes. Most candles can be made with straight parrafin, vybar and UV. One Step (1 Pour) is an exception to this when it comes to labor savings... aside from that, One Steps really offer little good in the way of burn. There are many bulk additive that you can add to the wax yourself, refine your own blend to perfection and save money. AND be a Master Chander! :)

:)

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Actually, fully refines straight parrafin can be had in anything from the 120s to the 160s+ -- not sure where the 130 "just below just above" thing came from.
I was referring to FR paraffins commonly used or marketed for container candles.

Your point about preblends could just as well apply to pillars. It's easy to make formulations comparable to pillar preblends, but I wouldn't go so far as to call it a scam. Anyone can choose to roll their own and many people know they could do that. They just don't want to get into it, so those products cater to a market.

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I was referring to FR paraffins commonly used or marketed for container candles.

Your point about preblends could just as well apply to pillars. It's easy to make formulations comparable to pillar preblends, but I wouldn't go so far as to call it a scam. Anyone can choose to roll their own and many people know they could do that. They just don't want to get into it, so those products cater to a market.

Ahhh. I see. Soft slabbed 120s are very common and usually among the cheapest. From everything I've seen a lot of these "container blends" are nothing but low melt-point and petrolatum, and some low-melt point applied Vybar - Maybe a hint of Micro, etc.

Call me crazy, but I just don't see the point with blends. But, like you said, to each his own. :) :) :)

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Ahhh. I see. Soft slabbed 120s are very common and usually among the cheapest. From everything I've seen a lot of these "container blends" are nothing but low melt-point and petrolatum, and some low-melt point applied Vybar - Maybe a hint of Micro, etc.

Call me crazy, but I just don't see the point with blends. But, like you said, to each his own. :) :) :)

I don't use preblends either but I see how they fit into the picture. Many different people make candles these days - not just us crazies.

I think the soft low-MP waxes you're thinking of are actually scale waxes rather than FR paraffins. They're soft because of the oil content. I love those cuz you can get really creative with them. It's THE stuff to use for one or two-pour container formulations of all kinds. If you're adept with additives you can devise a variety nifty votive blends too.

From what I've seen, the fully refined waxes circa 130 MP are usually marketed for making mottled containers and that's probably the best use for them in jars. An additive or two to smooth them out and increase the FO retention makes great votives. Add 5% UA and you can even make good pillars.

Making the wax jump through hoops is fun and interesting but some people just like to concentrate on the candle system rather than the wax formulation. That's enough work in and of itself and otherwise they like to attend to trivialities like work and family. :)

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To say something that most folks here don't to hear is this: blends are pretty much a scam. There are many bulk additive that you can add to the wax yourself, refine your own blend to perfection and save money. AND be a Master Chander! :)

:)

I started out blending my own from straight up paraffin, and in the end I decided on a pre-blend. I think it is an insult for you to come on and imply in order to be a "real" chandler I have to use straight up stuff and mix my own.

And as far as a "scam", well that is rude. I honestly won't even mess with straights anymore. DH loves them, but I prefer a pre-blend that suits my needs.

Thanks for the insult :rolleyes2

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I started out blending my own from straight up paraffin, and in the end I decided on a pre-blend. I think it is an insult for you to come on and imply in order to be a "real" chandler I have to use straight up stuff and mix my own.

And as far as a "scam", well that is rude. I honestly won't even mess with straights anymore. DH loves them, but I prefer a pre-blend that suits my needs.

Thanks for the insult :rolleyes2

Sorry, didn't mean to insult you. I just think that when you can buy wax for $.68 a lb (Or less for softer) and add a few additives and have the same thing as you do when you pay double that it is a scam. Why not just buy the additives and make your own blend. Spend the extra money on better (or more) scent, and make an even better product for the same cost?

But hey, sorry, I was only trying to save you money AND help you make a better product. I just see the fun in taking wax that is already to go and melthing it and pouring it. Heck, if I want to do that, why not buy a candle already made, melt it down and start over... just add a little extra scent.

Again, sorry to have offended you.

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