Jump to content

Some newbie basic questions about FO's and their uses


NewInTheBiz
 Share

Recommended Posts

In searching around the internet it appears that the use of FO's in candles and B & B is really popular in the U.S. I am curious to know if the use of FO's in warmers/burners is also popular. Which is more popular, candle making, soap making, or B & B?

If you want to use FO's in oil burners is it the norm to dilute with DPG?

Does anyone know what solvent is normally used in FO's? I am talking the FO at full strength. A fragrance is basically one or more molecules in a solvent. What solvent is generally used? PG? DPG? IPM? Ethanol?

Is there any advantage of burning a tart over burning the oil itself? Which method is more popular?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In searching around the internet it appears that the use of FO's in candles and B & B is really popular in the U.S. I am curious to know if the use of FO's in warmers/burners is also popular. Which is more popular, candle making, soap making, or B & B?

There are several different markets so I wouldn't say one is more popular than the other. Depends on what you do and how good your product is in order to become popular.

If you want to use FO's in oil burners is it the norm to dilute with DPG?

Yes.

Does anyone know what solvent is normally used in FO's? I am talking the FO at full strength. A fragrance is basically one or more molecules in a solvent. What solvent is generally used? PG? DPG? IPM? Ethanol?

Good luck getting that answered. It's not a shared secret from manufactures and I'm sure you can understand why.

Is there any advantage of burning a tart over burning the oil itself? Which method is more popular?

Popular is determined by your market place, not mine or others. What works in my market, doesn't mean it will work in yours so keep that in mind. You can't lump popularity in general really. There's no advantage of burning a tart over oil as long as both are quality products IMO. It is a person's preference what he or she wants to buy. Now that's speaking of FOs, but with EOs I would argue that burning an oil in a burner has more advantages than in a tart.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good luck getting that answered. It's not a shared secret from manufactures and I'm sure you can understand why.

I am new to the fragrance industry but not to the flavoring industry. In that industry they tell you what is used a solvent. In the flavoring industry ethanol and PG are often used as solvents. As such, a person with an allergy might react adversely to either or both of those solvents. In the fragrance industry, it may very well work differently but I would think a customer has a right to know what solvents are used. I can understand other ingredients are proprietary. But for health reasons a customer should have a right to know the solvents. I am sure a reseller or re-bottler would not tell you but have a feeling a real manufacturer would.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since you're putting flavor on something that will be edible they are required to list it. Everything that goes in a person's mouth, near or could be considered a consumable has to be approved etc. FOs and manufactures of them don't.

What about something that comes in contact with a person's skin? Aren't FO's used in soaps and perfumes? I would think that a consumer should at least know what the solvent is. A lot of people do not like to use products that contain alcohols. It sounds strange to me that a manufacturer would not be willing to tell you what the solvent is. I can believe that a reseller would scream 'proprietary' but I have my doubts that a 'real' manufacturer would object to telling you what solvent is used. And they should be willing to tell you if an FO is based on natural, artificial, natural and artificial, MWNI, or WONF.

I would think that even for use in candles, a person should want to know what the solvent is. And I do not see how knowing what the solvent is in an FO could leave a manufacturer open to abuse. You cannot recreate a formulation just by knowing what solvent is used.

If someone wanted to copy someone's product badly enough, you could spend $200 and have a GCMS analysis done on it. Then you would get the whole ball of wax.

People on this board who make candles seem to care whether they use paraffin or soy. I would think you would be just as concerned about what solvent is used and whether an FO contains alcohol. Not to mention natural or artificial, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not saying you don't make a good argument, but go ask Trilogy and see what they tell you. We do know that components like DEHP (di-phthalete) and DEP (diethyl phthalate) were in use. I imagine or rather hope those are not in use now. You might also address the International Fragrance Association and see if they can help. There isn't legislation out there that I know of that says they have to share that info so they don't is my opinion.

People on this board learn to become respectful of the waxes on this board. Any FO that contains an alcohol (thus a perfume) won't burn properly in a wax application.

It is a given that FOs are comprised of both EO and FO sources or are solely immitations (artificials). Just because something is an EO does not make it "natural" as not all EOs are steam distilled. To argue the point of what is natural is another undefined word (not by the dictionary, but it remains undefined in cosmetic purposes by government industries while organic does not. I imagine in the future that will likely change and should ... if organic should be certified, so should natural.)

Edited by Scented
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...