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Jody

why now is my soap turning

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almost translucent like after gelling? it never has before and i am not doing anything diff. except putting on a heating pad to force gel

otherwise was getting 1/2 gelled at times. also i am spritzing with alcohol once b/4 covering. the picture is of one gelled/one not. my soaps. my soaps have looked like the vibrant not gelled b/4 but not lately? 

am i doing something wrong? my batch is olive, coconut, palm, canola, castor. have been making for years..

any input is appreciated! 

 

woodsman soap.jpg

Edited by Jody

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If the soap is getting much warmer than usual on the heating pad, sometimes the alcohol spritz creates a layer of what seems like melt and pour soap on the top. 

 

When you cut it do you see a distinct thin layer at the top? 

 

In the end, if this is just the top, absolutely nobody but us makers know what it was supposed to look like. It sells just fine. 

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14 minutes ago, TallTayl said:

If the soap is getting much warmer than usual on the heating pad, sometimes the alcohol spritz creates a layer of what seems like melt and pour soap on the top. 

 

When you cut it do you see a distinct thin layer at the top? 

 

In the end, if this is just the top, absolutely nobody but us makers know what it was supposed to look like. It sells just fine. 

thank you so much, i think i will try let it gel on its own but have the heating pad handy to throw on top if not gelling completely. 

i know a couple of the eo soaps that i will continue to use it as hard to get a full gel. i dont see a distinct layer on top altho i am trying

to only spritz when i cover and not each time i look at it which im trying to cut down! i have noticed the alcohol does sure cut down on the ash.

thank you so much for your input! and i know your right! no one but us would know the difference!

i just know how i want it to look! we are such perfectionists! 

Edited by Jody

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When the ambient temps are cool it’s not a horrible idea to use the pad. When too cool the corners and edges of the logs can fail to saponify, which is much worse than a little discoloration on top. 

 

 I set my molds on top of the heat so the heat rises through the log. When making multiple, stack the molds on the pad covered in blankets and they all heat very well while insulating each other. To prevent partial gel, you may want to try using less water.

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6 minutes ago, TallTayl said:

When the ambient temps are cool it’s not a horrible idea to use the pad. When too cool the corners and edges of the logs can fail to saponify, which is much worse than a little discoloration on top. 

 

 I set my molds on top of the heat so the heat rises through the log. When making multiple, stack the molds on the pad covered in blankets and they all heat very well while insulating each other. To prevent partial gel, you may want to try using less water.

thank you! maybe i will set the loafs on the heating pad on low and see how that does, your so right id rather have a full gel than partial!

gosh i have alot of soap to make for market in the spring and i hate to start experimenting with not gelling... 

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