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Repour Advice Needed


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Hello Everyone!

I'm having problems with circular cracks and sinking with my soy container candles. I've tried every pour temp (in 5 degree intervals even). I've tried pre-heating jars, not pre-heating jars, room temp variations, etc. I haven't even added FO or dye yet and I can't get it to provide a smooth top! UGH! :mad:

I've decided that the only means to having a spectacular top is to do a re-pour...which I'm not against, but I don't know where to begin either. Before I give it a whirl, I thought I'd engage my CT family for advice and input. So bring it!

I do have some questions though...

1.) What temp should the wax be for a repour?

2.) I use a Presto Pot, but keep it free or dye and FO. What is the best way to save left over wax for a repour the next day? Or do I have to create a fresh batch for a repour?

3.) Is there a rule regarding how much wax you top off with or is it just enough to make the surface smooth?

4.) How long do I have to wait until I do a repour?

Thanks everyone - appreciate your input! Everyone is always so helpful!

-Faith :smiley2:

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For soy, buy yourself a heat gun in your HD or Lowe's paint department and zap those rough tops away!

The tough part about doing repours is that it can leave a little line between the old and repoured wax. If you do want to proceed, typically the temp of the wax is a bit higher than your original pour to try and melt the old wax a bit so it blends in. Most ppl would keep the remaining wax in the melting pot and use that. You wouldn't want to create a new batch of wax just for the repour.

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For soy, buy yourself a heat gun in your HD or Lowe's paint department and zap those rough tops away!

The tough part about doing repours is that it can leave a little line between the old and repoured wax. If you do want to proceed, typically the temp of the wax is a bit higher than your original pour to try and melt the old wax a bit so it blends in. Most ppl would keep the remaining wax in the melting pot and use that. You wouldn't want to create a new batch of wax just for the repour.

Hi RS,

Oops, should have mentioned that I've tried the heat gun! My bad. Using the heat gun has caused the top of the candle where I melted the wax to shrink away from the glass and then I have a circular looking wet spot. I'm just not sure about leaving the wax to cool in my pouring pot - I'd have to double boiler it to re-melt and that's not how I've beem melting my wax.

Have you ever heard of anyone using silicon ice-cube trays to pour their wax into and then after they've cooled, pop them out for a remelt in the microwave? Or is that a no-no with the FO already in the wax?

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I am using GB415, my wax is in a presto pot also. I keep it clear of dye and FO, just plain wax. I put a candy thermometer in it and get the wax to 175, usually (on my presto pot, that is between the W and the A on WARM) I then take a 4 cup small measuring pouring pitcher and pour the wax in my pouring pot, then I weigh it. I write down the weight measurement just in case, just to the side of the pot, I keep newspaper on my counter tops. I then push TARE with the pitcher still on the scales and it will go to zero, then I just start pouring my FO directly into the pouring pot (since my FO has the spouts on them) that way I am not wasting any expensive FO) once I get the amt. of FO I need. I stir for about 2 minutes and let set til it looks like things are floating in the wax, almost small flake like things and it will get a little cloudy, then I pour into my glass containers. I don't pre-heat my jars. (naturally, I have already pre-wicked my jars and put my labels on them while waiting for the wax to cool down) I have messed w/it like you said you have and I have poured from 100 to 165 degrees and w/mine, it is best to just look at it and wait for the floaters. Mine have come out very creamy looking and smooth on top. Sometimes I will get wet spots, but who doesn't. I do have a heat gun and I have used it previously til I found my niche with this wax. I hope this will help you

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Hi RS,

Oops, should have mentioned that I've tried the heat gun! My bad. Using the heat gun has caused the top of the candle where I melted the wax to shrink away from the glass and then I have a circular looking wet spot. I'm just not sure about leaving the wax to cool in my pouring pot - I'd have to double boiler it to re-melt and that's not how I've beem melting my wax.

Have you ever heard of anyone using silicon ice-cube trays to pour their wax into and then after they've cooled, pop them out for a remelt in the microwave? Or is that a no-no with the FO already in the wax?

Interesting, with CB135, I haven't had this problem. How long are you heat gunning for? Because I'm doing it just long enough to smooth the top out and there's no "depth" of remelted wax on the sides of my tumbler.. I hope that makes sense... and at times I have to heat gun more than once.

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Interesting, with CB135, I haven't had this problem. How long are you heat gunning for? Because I'm doing it just long enough to smooth the top out and there's no "depth" of remelted wax on the sides of my tumbler.. I hope that makes sense... and at times I have to heat gun more than once.

Maybe I'm heat gunning too much - I have had to get a melt pool to the edges when using the heat gun to try and level the top. The circular cracks and cave ins I'm getting aren't small - they are deep. Heat gunning, will certainly smooth it out and eliminate the crack, but there's still a deep crater or downturn at the center. I've switched from CB-135 to C-3 since a local supplier is close by and I can save on shipping. It'll be best for me if I can make the C-3 work...

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Ahhh, finally in the last post, I see you are using C3.

C3 will develop this crack under a lot of circumstances. It needs to cool slowly. This means on a rack (the cooling surface can either rob the bottom of the candle of heat or cause it to be trapped, depending on what it is made from), out of drafts. Covering with a box or cooling in the oven or a styrofoam cooler are good solutions because the air is not disturbed and the candles will cool more slowly. The softer, more fragile top wax is being pulled downward as the bottom wax contracts. The top needs to stay warmer longer so it isn't pulled so as the bottom cools.

When you get the conditions correct, C3 produces a flawless top. When you don't, it doesn't.

Heatgun C3 at your own risk. It WILL increase frosting, especially with certain FOs and colors. If a repour is needed, I always reserve a little for this reason and I reheat it to a slightly warmer temp than the original pour temp, being SURE to stop the pour just as it starts to touch the side of the container. This is tedious and a major PITA to get just right... and sometimes the second pour cracks because the candle below was a LOT cooler then the repour wax temp...

Here's another tip when the tops look bad...

First, DON'T trim the wicks yet!! Leave the wick holders on. Turn on your oven to no more than 200°F and allow it to heat up. Put your candles in there on racks and let them melt. Turn the oven off. After they are completely cool, the tops are usually MUCH improved, if not downright perfect.:rolleyes2

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Ahhh, finally in the last post, I see you are using C3.

:bow: I love it when you post, Stella - I always learn so much from you!!! I like that you are a fellow C3 user as well.

Thanks for the advice and insight above. It all makes perfect sense. I like the idea of the oven. I haven't thought of that, nor have I read anything on that before (except for pre-heating containers). For now, I'm going to begin putting a box over the candles and set them on racks for even cooling. I haven't been doing either of those things.

I'm hooked on the C3...I love how easy it is to work with (despite my current tops). I especially enjoy the no shipping! I'm dedicated to making this wax work - no matter how long it takes! Your advice will certainly help get me there more painlessly, and I'm sure you'll see more posts from me as I navigate through!

Thanks again!

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I hope it helps! I sure do envy your local pickup!! I have to have mine shipped...:undecided

C3 can be a PITA just like any soy-based wax, but I have found it to be a reasonable monster (or maybe it's just the devil I know...). :) Whenever I have had problems, if I look back on exactly what I did at what temp and for how long and stuff like that, I can usually figure out where I jumped on the highway to hell. :tongue2: Most problems will resolve themselves with a remelt. ;)

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Ahhh, finally in the last post, I see you are using C3.

C3 will develop this crack under a lot of circumstances. It needs to cool slowly. This means on a rack (the cooling surface can either rob the bottom of the candle of heat or cause it to be trapped, depending on what it is made from), out of drafts. Covering with a box or cooling in the oven or a styrofoam cooler are good solutions because the air is not disturbed and the candles will cool more slowly. The softer, more fragile top wax is being pulled downward as the bottom wax contracts. The top needs to stay warmer longer so it isn't pulled so as the bottom cools.

Hey Everyone,

I took Stella's advice and wanted to share my results.

I used C3 wax, no FO and no dye - just straight wax. I placed the jars on a cooling rack and poured at 130*. I then placed a box over the jars overnight (total of 12 hours) and kept the room temp stable at 75*. The next morning (today) the jars had great glass adhesion and no circular cracks or cave ins (yeahhh!!!). BUT - the tops were very grainy - almost slushy looking. When I touched the tops, little pieces of wax stuck to my fingers like sand...and it was very soft and almost oily. Upon further inspection it looks like it might be grainy about 2 inches down from the top.

Again, the good news is that I slowed down the cooling of the wax resulting in no circular cracks or cave ins, but now I'm thinking I've slowed down the cooling process maybe too much. Is that even possible??? I know I need to continue testing pour temps now that I've changed the process, but I would like to know what people think for why I got the results I did...

Thanks! :smiley2:

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First, put that candle back into the oven and remelt it, then turn off the oven and allow it to cool in there.

I have seen this same phenom and it is related to the temp at which you melted & poured. The candle WILL harden some (takes about 1 month), but it will never be "right" so a remelt is needed.

Try melting and running the temp up about 185°, then drop the temp to "slush" stirring occasionally, then raise the temp to 165° (add FO/dye or not) and pour no cooler than about 150°. Cool on racks, covered. ;)

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