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Palm wax pillars and molds


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I'm waiting for CS to get more tortoise shell in otherwise I would just pour myself and find out the answer.

Since I'm waiting I thought I'd ask those of you who have been using palm wax a while. Do you notice a difference when using an aluminum mold compared to a tin mold. (oh what ever the other kind is) When I'm making pillars depending on the finish I want I'll use a different type of mold. So I'm just curious if the same holds true with palm or not.

thanks,

Karen B

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Yes, palm wax behaves differently when we use molds of different materials. We've used plastic, polycarbonate, glass, china, tin and aluminum. Heavy aluminum molds have worked the best for us, hands down. The other materials work okay - just a tad more difficult to get the consistant sized crystals that we are looking for. HTH :)

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Thanks you very much, I know it's very sensitive to heat so I wondered if different molds would make difference or not. Glad to hear it likes aluminum that's my personal favorite.

Oh polycarbonate, I really need to get a couple of those for some candles I do. I think it would make my life so much easier but that's a different subject.

thanks,

Karen B

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I use plastic and aluminum molds! Mine... there isn't any difference in the crystals, but that is not a major concern with me! the hot throw and burn is my pet peeve right now! HTH

but it is all a matter of preference!

Oh I hear you, I have the Glass Glow that I'm playing with right now and air pockets is my biggest thing. (OK and finding the right wick) This stuff seems very picky to the environment around it so I figured the mold probably will effect this wax too. With my paraffin I use tin or aluminum depending on the type of candle I want to make and the finished look. So I've been dying to find out what happens with this stuff in different molds. Right now I just sit and wait.

thanks,

Karen B

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The temperature range of the mold material is the problem. Any smooth surface makes a fine mold, but some materials cannot take the high heat at which palm wax is poured and some do not release as easily as others. Palm wax needs to cool slowly and plastic molds tend to melt, warp, etc. when exposed to high temps, particularly for a prolonged period of time.

The Glass Glow craze has been wonderful as a way to introduce people to palm wax (it DID exist before "Glass Glow" as many of us can attest!) but it is not an easy wax with which to work. Despite the manufacturers' and suppliers' best efforts, quality palm wax candles cannot be made by "cake mix" style methods. It takes a lot of trial and error to learn how to get consistent results from palm wax. Try to be patient and keep good notes on everything you do when pouring and you will soon learn how to overcome your challenges. There is a wealth of information on how to deal with different issues here in the threads for anyone who is willing to search.

Good Luck! :)

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Thanks Stella1952,

I'd rather not admit in public how long I've been making candles :grin2: but will say I do remember the craze just a few years ago when the all the palm waxes 1st came out. I don't remember container wax I think it was the pillar stuff. I just remember burning a few votives. (I remember 3 I think, feathering was one) I tried back then but the throw at that time didn't thrill me. Glass Glow seems to be getting a better throw than the old stuff was. (or it's the FO's I'm picking this time around)

I just basically wondered if the Palm wax reacted differently in Tin molds than in Aluminum. My opinion is the finish with paraffin will be different with these 2 and it seemed to make sense that Palm wax will look different in these different mold too.

(If this post doesn't make any sense sorry it's been a long day)

Thanks for you help, now if only Candle Science would get this wax in.

Karen B

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The difference is not in the metals, rather it is how quickly the metals lose heat. Tin molds lose heat rapidly as do the ultra thin aluminum molds. The heavier aluminum molds retain the heat a bit longer. The amount and consistency of crystal formation is directly related to how slowly and evenly the wax cools. When we do palm pillars, we set the newly poured molds into a prewarmed oven to cool (turn off when candles go in). Under those conditions, there is no difference in the surface quality from aluminum or tin molds because the rate of cooling is controlled and the temperature is maintained all around the mold, so there isn't an appreciable difference between the temp at the top of the candle and the bottom. If we cool on a cookie rack, covered, we begin seeing a difference in the two metals because we cannot control the rate of cooling nor the circulation of the heat as well. The aluminum starts making a difference under those circumstances. Hope this makes sense...:P

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That made perfect sense and also explains why I see a difference with paraffin. With containers and my mottled pillars I do like you do and put them in the oven then turn it off, that does help. Thanks so much for the explanation I've know there is a difference between tin and aluminum but didn't really figure out why.

thanks Stella1952,

Karen B

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