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"These Fragrances are used and tested by us in our own candles. We use between 9 - 12 percent by weight in our candles, this alone should tell you about the quality. Less quality Fragrance oils would kick out or bleed out from a candle at this percent. "

I read this at the Taylored Concepts website. I have heard they have very good fragrance oils, but 12%? Is that really going to make a stronger, better fragranced candle? I thought that the least you can get away with the better.

Also, I always have thought that if there's a problem with the fragrance oil bleeding it's an issue with the wax, not the oil itself. Do high quality fragrance oils actually bind to the wax better? I never thought about that before.

Laura :smiley2:

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Also, I always have thought that if there's a problem with the fragrance oil bleeding it's an issue with the wax, not the oil itself. Do high quality fragrance oils actually bind to the wax better? I never thought about that before.
There's a huge difference in how well fragrance oils bind with wax. Whether that's a quality issue depends on how you look at it. Certainly it's a compatibility issue, but an inevitable one because fragrances need to be made out of different substances and it will cause their compatibility to vary. Whether that's a concern depends on the type of candle you're making and how much FO you need to get your desired result.

The way I would define technical quality (very roughly) in a fragrance oil is that the scent is well designed by the perfumist, and that it's formulated to be as strong as it can be for that particular fragrance. That doesn't guarantee it will be an exceptionally strong thrower or will have exceptional compatibility. It's too complicated for every FO to be optimal in every respect.

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There's a huge difference in how well fragrance oils bind with wax. Whether that's a quality issue depends on how you look at it. Certainly it's a compatibility issue, but an inevitable one because fragrances need to be made out of different substances and it will cause their compatibility to vary. Whether that's a concern depends on the type of candle you're making and how much FO you need to get your desired result.

The way I would define technical quality (very roughly) in a fragrance oil is that the scent is well designed by the perfumist, and that it's formulated to be as strong as it can be for that particular fragrance. That doesn't guarantee it will be an exceptionally strong thrower or will have exceptional compatibility. It's too complicated for every FO to be optimal in every respect.

:confused: Replies like that sometimes make me wonder what the heck IM doing making candles, LOL :wink2:

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LMAO:laugh2:

Don't let top's analysis get to ya. I'm with ya candleessence. He takes this stuff seriously ( and quite frankly we should ALL be "pooling" our money to invest in him and his "findings/discoveries") We are grateful that he shares his knowledge with us....sometimes he has to break it down to "See Spot Run" for us....which I might add, he has been generous enough to do many times.Sometimes I LITERALLY study his answers LOL and have learned quite abit about wax etc.

I think that his short answer to your question is No. LOL

We love ya TOP! Keep it coming!

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LMAO:laugh2:

Don't let top's analysis get to ya. I'm with ya candleessence. He takes this stuff seriously ( and quite frankly we should ALL be "pooling" our money to invest in him and his "findings/discoveries") We are grateful that he shares his knowledge with us....sometimes he has to break it down to "See Spot Run" for us....which I might add, he has been generous enough to do many times.Sometimes I LITERALLY study his answers LOL and have learned quite abit about wax etc.

I think that his short answer to your question is No. LOL

We love ya TOP! Keep it coming!

LOL, I have a bachelor's degree in science and sometimes Top's answers make me feel like I'm back in chemistry class! :D Love it!

Anyway, I'm with PrairieAnnie on this one. IMO, if you need 12% FO in a candle, it's NOT a good quality FO!

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I must defend Robert @ Taylored Concepts. His oils are not weak! I use his Leather & lace at about 6% as well as Spearmint and several others. Texas chandlers seem to be of the mind-set that if a little is good then a whole lot more will be super great! He is talking about the quality of his oils not kicking out. If you really want to use 12%, then try it. It might scent a whole city block. Robert's FO's are very good & strong. That remark about 12% has been on his website since he put up his website and it has nothing to do with the quality or strength of his scents.

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I don't see that the statement means much of anything at all, in reality. Seems like simple marketspeak, to me. On the face of it, making such a claim might seem a little less than totally ethical, but when others are making even more outrageous claims, some of which are outright lies, you have to give the guy a little lattitude.

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Just my 2 scents worth here, for what it is worth. Robert at Taylored Concepts mixes most or all of his FO's, he has for years. I think that his statement on the site about using up to 12%, simply states that that amount has been tested in their candles and has been found to be a safe amount to use. I am not thinking that it implies that you HAVE to use that much to get a good throw, just that you can. I am using some of TC's FO's and I can tell you that I get a good throw in my soy with about 7-8%. He has some of the best FO's around IMO. If in doubt, call and talk to him (they are open on Saturdays). He and his wife are very knowledgeable and helpful and I am sure they could clarify that for you. Don't let it stop you from trying them out. :D

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The best I can remember, Candlewic ( which, by the way, I wouldn't recommend to my worst enemy) is the only supplier that I have used that marks their oils "Polar" and "Non-Polar". I can't say as I understand the importance of knowing that unless you are using the FO in Gel Candles. Maybe you could explain that to us Donita...and maybe start with the differences in them. TIA:smiley2:

Michael

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The reason for testing polarity is you don't want oil leaking out of gel candles and catching on fire. I see that there are companies that say their candles are gel safe but I wonder who tested their oils. In any candle application as we know (sometimes the hard way) all oils have their own "personalities" in a particular wax. That is why you need to experiment and test each oil with the wax you use. Donita

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