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OK, I may be wrong but


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I got this email from a non-candlemaking friend of mine...

>>> If you want drip-free, long-burning candles, put them in

>>> the freezer overnight before burning them. Also, If you

>>> keep your candles in the freezer they will last longer

>>> and drip less.

he got it from someone else....

I know I have put candles in the freezer for short times to get them to release from molds and once I forgot about a small one.. lol... and so it cracked.

I told him not to do this... they would crack. but that if he wanted to cool them in there for a few mins. before burning that would make them last longer only because it is so cold it will burn slower. but not to store them there...

was I wrong?

daisyfairy

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well, he thanked me for the info not to.. he said he thought that sounded wrong to him.. but he just thought it wouldn't work, not that they would crack.

I guess there will be lots of broken candles if this is going around. :(

daisy fairy

I know I keep getting this one email from,,I think its called "Candle Wealth" and I have asked them repeatdly to stop sending them,,,They sell Soy and they knock the paraffin users to death,,I use paraffin!!!

Anyway there will always be people making it hard for others,,,:(

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Having been stupid enough to leave pillars in the refridgerator over night, on more than one occasion, I can testify to the fact that they WILL crack.

Even if they don't crack while in there, they probably will, when you take them out. I once left a candle, still in the mold, in the fridge for about 6 hours. Took it out and demolded it, figuring it would be ruined. It looked fine, so I thought I'd gotten lucky. Sat it one the counter and walked away. About two minutes I heard the thing crack, making the same sound that ice cubes sometimes do. So much for my luck.

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I heard that quite a while back, but had forgotten it. Haven't tried it yet though. Sounds like another experiment in the making...

It may depend on the temp the fridge is set at. On many occasions, I've left candles in the fridge overnight with no adverse affects. The freezer is another story :embarasse

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I've left candles in the car overnight, and they crack as soon as they are handled (kind of neat to watch). I've read instructions telling one to place candles in the freezer for a few hours before burning... to make them burn more slowly and longer. I can only deduce that any such advice is coming from someone who has never actually taken the time to validate the claim.

Now there is one thing that I can't understand, but have never explored. In much of the older literature about candles, they say to soak candles in brine to produce dripless candles. I've never tried it, I don't see the logic, but that doesn't mean it isn't true... just something to think about, and probably worth a try when you have spare time.

I'm getting my dinner on my keyboard... so am gonna stop.:wink2:

Cheers,

Alan :smiley2:

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Now there is one thing that I can't understand, but have never explored. In much of the older literature about candles, they say to soak candles in brine to produce dripless candles. I've never tried it, I don't see the logic, but that doesn't mean it isn't true... just something to think about, and probably worth a try when you have spare time.

Cheers,

Alan :smiley2:

You say older literature...

Makes me womder if it's old enough to be talking about tallow candles. I can kinda see where the salt might dry out the tallow. Or leach some enzymes out of it.

I'm afraid to try it. If it actually DID work, I'd be online for a month brushing up on my chemistry trying to figure out WHY it did. :smiley2:

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Years ago my mother in law had loads of taper candles in her freezer. This was way before I started making candles. She said Heloise had written about this. Well, after taking the candles out, which had probably been there for at least a year, they were in pieces, lol. Kinda like keeping batteries in the fridge I guess.

Pam R

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I have also read this on some of the commercial candle websites. Apparently the argument is that by putting them in a cold fridge prior to use your candle will burn longer because the wax is harder.... - don't know if we are talking about the same thing here, but it sounds like it.:smiley2:

K

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