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Silicone Candle Molds?


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They take a bit of getting used to. I always have to pour a bit hotter, to avoid getting that frosty/rustic look. They seem to cool a lot slower, too, the silicone holds heat in.

Some shapes there's just no other way. But they aren't always the easiest thing to work with. Like anything lse, though, it gets easier the more you do it.

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What got me curious was reading through posts about tricks for unmolding candles and problems with sticking. My soap SLIDES right out of my silicone mold liners, so I wondered about the ease of removing candles from silicone molds.

They seem expensive, though. I wondered if that was a hinderance. $30 -something bucks for a large pillar mold? At least my soap molds make a bunch of bars at once. If you were in production mode for candle making, you'd need a lot of these molds, right?

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What got me curious was reading through posts about tricks for unmolding candles and problems with sticking. My soap SLIDES right out of my silicone mold liners, so I wondered about the ease of removing candles from silicone molds.

They seem expensive, though. I wondered if that was a hinderance. $30 -something bucks for a large pillar mold? At least my soap molds make a bunch of bars at once. If you were in production mode for candle making, you'd need a lot of these molds, right?

I don't think you'll have any candles *sliding* out of a silicon mold. You generally have to peel them out like peeling an orange or a banana.

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I use silicone for BW pillar candles - they do fall right out. The tapers I do in silicone have to be pulled out a bit because of the way they are made at the top and bottom. Don't have any finish problems with BW, but have not used them for any other waxes.

There are different silicones though - the ones I use for electrics are much more pliable - those you do "peel off".

Depending on the type of silicone used, they can "hold" on to dye for a another pour or two, so if you were doing a lot of candles you would probably want to invest in one for each standard hue (blues, reds, greens, etc.). What I have found is that the more pliable the silicone the less it holds the color, however the harder the silicone the more durable it appears to be (I've only based this on the few silicone molds I have so you know). If I were using silicone for plain sided candles I would choose the harder silicone, but obviously for detailed work, I would probably choose the more pliable type (if I could).

HTH.

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