Jump to content

1 week old to candle making:)


 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone my name is Felicha Im a stay at home mom and have a passion for candles. I have been in the work field for quite some time and just cant seen to find that right career(even with a degree) so I decided to come up with a business plan that will fit me. I am an encourager, bubbly, understanding, I love smiling, very girly, strong, but sensitive, love helping people, and helping to make there day better. candle making was at the top of my list !.... I have several question I have researched and read alot, and although the WWW(world wide web) has alot of information and suppliers I just dont know who to trust. I found this forum while searching for more ideas read many of the discussion and JOINED right away...this was the place for me lol...I need help with all information regarding soy candles, I have purchased the starter kit from hobby lobby and it came with palm oil wax, I since then purchased the soy wax flakes from hobby lobby. Is there a site to purchase soy flakes, fragrance,containers...etc...Can you please help me to get started on the right track, im excited and ready to put in the sweat equity lol:yay:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm also just starting up, but here's a list of sites I have bookmarked so far. I personally use Candlewic for the majority of my needs because they are within driving distance to me so I eliminate the expensive shipping charges. So far I have had great experiences with them so I can definitely recommend them. I haven't personally used the other sites yet but I'm pretty sure you can find someone on this forum who has used each of them if you have questions about them!

Candlewic

Peak

Lonestar

Candle Science

WickIt

Mill Creek

Bitter Creek

Candles & Supplies

Wicks Unlimited

Swans Candles

Nature's Garden Candles

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, check out the Vegetable Wax section, you can find all sorts of good information in the threads there. Just browse and take mental notes, and when you come across something you don't understand, look into it further, and then ask if you can't figure it out.

A good thing to remember is that if you have a question, someone else has probably already asked it and you can find the answers by searching. The search tool on this site is not great, but if you search on Google "site:craftserver.com Your question or keywords here" you will get a list of forum threads with your search results.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I may offer some advice, here it is. Be patient. Don't order a ton of sample oils. You will have access the classifieds here within 30 days. Wait and buy your FO's there; you will save a ton of $. The world of co-ops and classies will amaze you, and since you are just testing you will appreciate the discount. I may get slammed for posting this, but I think it is the best advice a newbie here can get. Go with one wax, one size jar, and then add your FO's and such. But from experience, a 1 oz. sample of oil isn't enough to properly test. I buy a pound or a half pound on those I don't have confidence in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Look into different suppliers based on who is closest to you and who will be less $ in shipping. Like Bliss said, don't get carried away with too many variables at the beginning. Soy wax is going to give you enough fits in testing as it is. Read about the different waxes (peaks site sells many and has good descriptions of each of them), pick one and start testing with it. Choose one container size. Now the only changing variable in your testing will be the FO and the wick. Get your supplies from a reputable supplier. Craft store supplies are overpriced and not so great quality. Be patient. If you want to do this right, it's going to take considerable time and money on your part to test and create a good product. So strap in and get ready for a long ride!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be patient. Don't order a ton of sample oils. You will have access the classifieds here within 30 days. Wait and buy your FO's there; you will save a ton of $. The world of co-ops and classies will amaze you, and since you are just testing you will appreciate the discount.... Go with one wax, one size jar, and then add your FO's and such.

Yep. I totally agree. Keep it simple and get one thing down before you move on to the next - makes for a good foundation and is easier on the wallet as well. I do like 1-2 oz. FOs to test because it helped me develop a list and budget for the "must haves." We didn't buy anything more than 2 oz. for several months, but as we tested, we were able to compare which supplier had the best vanilla, patchouli, Juniper Breeze, cinnamon, etc. among the samples and order the larger sizes from the ones we liked best. It helps to keep a list 'cause there are a lot of wonderful suppliers out there... Keep GOOD notes on EVERYTHING!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good Morning and thank you all for all the great advice, I will do exactly what you guys advise and take it step by step to set a great foundation. I have one other question there is someone in my area selling 171 clean 40z baby food jars for $35 would this be a good investment to start with? oh they all have lids also. I thought it would be but would like the experts advice. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glass jars are not all alike...safety first!! Containers not made specifically for candles need to be tested and retested to be sure they will not crack or break from the heat of a burning candle. IMO-Hobby Lobby does not sell quaility wax, fo's, or wicks that would produce a great smelling or burning candle. Search this forum-there are great suppliers out there...Peaks, CandleScience, and Millcreeek come to mind. Have Fun! :cheesy2:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good Morning and thank you all for all the great advice, I will do exactly what you guys advise and take it step by step to set a great foundation. I have one other question there is someone in my area selling 171 clean 40z baby food jars for $35 would this be a good investment to start with? oh they all have lids also. I thought it would be but would like the experts advice. :)

You may get several opinions on the jars because everyone does things a little different. *edit* I completely forgot the glass safety issue....jars can break under the stress of the heat. Using jars from suppliers meant for candle making is the safest way to go. You will find we do stress safety, safety, safety and test, test, test on the board.

What you might want to do is start out with a jar either the same of what you think you may be using down the road or one similar in size and design. The reason I say that is because part of the wicking variables you will be looking at are going to be for your jar. So if you begin testing now on the baby food jars, you will have to start all over later with a different jar. Other variables for your wicking is the fragrance oil (each fragrance oil you try needs to be tested) and the wax. Some wicks are inclined to work better with certain waxes.

I know that sounds horribly confusing and I don't in any way want to confuse or scare you off from making candles. It is fun, rewarding, hair pulling, expensive...the list goes on :)

$35 could buy you approx. 3 cases of regular type candle jars from many suppliers less shipping or 1-2 cases with shipping depending on what you buy.

For wicking purposes, there is this "dreaded" (for lack of a better word) size in a jar from 4" in diameter and above that may need to be double wicked...especially with soy. The straighter the sides, usually the easier to wick. Such as a tumbler type jar or Salsa jar. Salsa jars are inexpensive and attractive. They are about .50 a jar maybe? Someone may chime in here that uses them for better pricing info.

Many have begun at the local Hobby Lobby store. Most seasoned chandlers will suggest you buy your waxes from one of the suppliers who carry high end products. The list in the post above is a good example of some. The same would be recommended for your fragrance oils and wicks. You will end up saving money but also get high end, quality products. Once you choose a wax you want to work with, get yourself a sample pack of wicks (many places offer those), a couple fragrance oils, some candle dye if you wish and begin testing. The testing process is going to take some time and patience. But it is sooo worth it :) Soon, you may find yourself an addict as so many of the rest of us are.

GL to you and welcome to the board.

Edited by jeanie353
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good Morning and thank you all for all the great advice, I will do exactly what you guys advise and take it step by step to set a great foundation. I have one other question there is someone in my area selling 171 clean 40z baby food jars for $35 would this be a good investment to start with? oh they all have lids also. I thought it would be but would like the experts advice. :)

These were $6.50 the other day at Walmart for 12:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Better-Homes-and-Gardens-Half-Pint-Glass-Jar-with-Lid-and-Ring/16351137

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thank you Jeanie so much, I am so willing to put in the work im so excited . This is a personal craft that sets everyone apart because of their personal touch and sweat equity lol...so I wont purchase the baby food jars, I understand safety has to be first and I do agree...cheaper is not always better...but wow 171 jars for $35 lol great deal for another project i guess lol.. again thank you

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to your newest addiction!! :) Tell your hubby to kiss all extra money goodbye because once you get the hang of it, you will become a spending chick that needs the latest new oils :) heheh .. I won't be able to help you much with soy but there are a lot of great people on this board who will. READ READ READ and always ask questions if your not sure. Another must is no matter how fugly your candle is-- you must post pictures :) We love pictures!!! Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Beth, those jars from Walmart look nice and are definitely affordable. It looks like they have Better Homes engraved on the jar, is that just an overlay on the image or is it really on the jar? It also looks like the jar has a lattice pattern on it; is that decoration or is it actually indented? Just wondering if these would be good for a beginner to learn with (ME!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is just my opinion, but I think it might be easier for beginners to learn wicking if you start with a jar that's diameter is less than its height (like an 8 ounce jelly jar) instead of a short and wide jar. Especially if you are starting with soy.

Edited by deb426
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Beth, those jars from Walmart look nice and are definitely affordable. It looks like they have Better Homes engraved on the jar, is that just an overlay on the image or is it really on the jar? It also looks like the jar has a lattice pattern on it; is that decoration or is it actually indented? Just wondering if these would be good for a beginner to learn with (ME!)

It's engraved in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DO NOT BUY USED GLASSWARE FOR CANDLEMAKING! Buy glassware that is approved for candlemaking purposes. All glass is NOT alike and the thickness has nothing to do with it.

Try the 4 oz. jelly jar (in grocery store) or the 8 oz. widemouth canning jar by Kerr. Don't exceed 3" in inside diameter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Question from another newbie: is it okay to reuse jars you've used for testing, for further testing? I have a couple that I've burned to the end but don't want to throw them away :/

I do this. I clean them very well and run them through the dishwasher and they are brand new and ready to go again! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

is it okay to reuse jars you've used for testing, for further testing?
Absolutely. It's okay to do ANYTHING you wish for your personal use. I do suggest that you use common sense and not pour into flammable containers or ones that have been subjected to extremes in temperature, are scratched or chipped, etc., but that's strictly up to you.

When you give away or sell candles, the materials should be new and should conform to ASTM standards for candlemaking. The products should also be labeled in accordance with FTC laws (name of manufacturer or name of the manufacturing company, address, net weight of product) and industry safety warnings.

Even if you give a product away (rather than selling it), you should follow the rules for selling products because you cannot be sure the person to whom you gave the item will not regift it to a third party. It's an extra step that isn't a requirement, but it is the ethical and wise to do. Remember always that you are manufacturing a product that uses an open flame. Safety concerns should always be foremost and one should never assume anything about a customer's (or recipient's) knowledge and practice of product safety, even if it's yo' mama! You cannot control whether someone FOLLOWS your safety warnings, but at least you can give them instructions and affix the normal warning labels to your product. It's called "due diligence."

Touching on the subject of legal stuff, before you sell your products, be sure you have product liability insurance. Check the business forum for more information on this.

run them through the dishwasher and they are brand new
Au contraire, Pierre. They are clean, USED containers. They are NOT "brand new." They have been subjected to heat, etc. This is FINE for personal use but they are not brand new nor are they as good as brand new. Glass containers have a long useful life, depending on the stresses to which they have been subjected. Because the internal stresses in glass are mostly invisible to the naked eye, one can pop without warning.

I reuse ALL of my containers for testing and personal use, but they are strictly for my personal use and are never gifted nor sold.

Edited by Stella1952
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No problemo - I knew what you meant, but sometimes new folks take things very literally, like with my statement about not buying used glassware for candlemaking. I thought the statement was clear, especially because we were talking about buying a quantity of used glassware (the babyfood jars), but it gave the wrong impression, so I'm glad we cleared that up. : )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Question from another newbie: is it okay to reuse jars you've used for testing, for further testing? I have a couple that I've burned to the end but don't want to throw them away :/

Oh sure...I do it all the time. I heat the old jars (with a little wax left in the bottom) in the microwave, wipe it out with a paper towel and it is set to test again. The glue does hold even if I have a slight wax residue on the bottom. I use high temp glue sticks. I cannot wash them in the sink b/c my blend does include paraffin but I've never had any problems doing it by just wiping them out. Use an awful lot of paper towels tho'.... so much that I buy 2 cases at a time now a days.

*edit* to say....I do this only for testing or for my own personal use. After reading the other posts....I thought, I too should clarify that.

Edited by jeanie353
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...