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Off-centering CDNs


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Well, a lop-sided burn looks crummy in containers, too, so it's a neat trick for either one. It's a little more difficult to effect in pillars, but not bad. The results are very worth the effort. And, not that it has a bearing on lopsided burns or wick twisting, but CDNs and CDs are non-directional.

Edited by Stella1952
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... but CDNs and CDs are non-directional.
Am I understanding this correctly... CDN's are not directional wicks? I've always found they curled in the direction of the ^ thereby offsetting the flame location in the candle. Maybe I don't understand the definition of 'directional'?

As for twisting, how many twists would you give a container with 3" height of wax?

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*groan*

That is NOT what is meant by "directional." You need to read up about wicks...

http://www.wicksunlimited.com/heinz_candle_wicks.php

The "curl" of CDs & CDNs is a self-trimming stance. The heat is higher on one side, thus the curl & lopsided burn.

Jonsie, there is no exact number of twists... hunt up the recent two threads about it... You twist it just enough to make the flame rotate but not tightly. Play with it and find out what works best for you.

Edited by Stella1952
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"Directional" refers to the flow of wax through the wick. Some wicks are non-directional, which means they do not have an "up" or "down"... Directional wicks only flow in one direction... For soy, a non-directional, coreless wick slurps up that thick wax better than do other wick types. Kinda like needing a bigger straw for a malt than you need for a diet coke...

twist the wick until it starts begging for mercy
I love the squeaking sound they make...:naughty:

Just twist the wick until it looks a little worried and the burn will be more concentric. :smiley2:

Don't twist TOO much because this can affect the way the wick is made - the tension, braiding, etc. Just a few gentle twists is sufficient. The wick should absolutely NOT be twisted so tightly that it starts doubling over on itself... The side to which the wick curls is always the hotter side... The idea is to keep the HEAT centered in the candle. If the wick burns to one side, you can either off-center the wick, which makes the candle look as if monkeys wicked it, or make the wick move in a circle to even out the heat distribution.

Other good general wick information pages... scroll, click & read... :smiley2:

http://www.wicksunlimited.com/candle_wick_assembly.php

Heinz Verhaegh (manufacturer of CD - Stabilo and CDN Stabilo KST - wicks)

http://www.heinzverhaegh.com/id79.html

Understand that general (and specific) wick information is often based on information about wicking paraffin candles, unless the test specifically refers to veggie wax candles. Also understand that RoC info, flame height, MP depth & width, etc. vary from wax to wax and whether the wax is dyed, scented, contains additives, etc. This is why I don't pay much attention to charts, etc. Unless you are burning the exact same wicks in the exact same wax formulation under the same conditions as the ones used in the tests for the charts, the information is not accurate! This is why we have to TEST and record our own data precisely: to discover the values that work best for our personal candle systems...

Our efforts are often frustrated by the different fragrances, dyes and other ingredients we use - the composition of Cucumber Melon, for example, may vary quite a bit from supplier to supplier because they may not purchase their stock from the same manufacturer and may also dilute the oils before reselling them to us. EOs are even more frustrating because we are dealing with natural materials which vary with the crop, location the crop is grown, etc.

Edited by Stella1952
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Just to lighten up a bit, I suggest you twist the wick until it starts begging for mercy, bwhahahahaha!

Ok, sorry folks, I wil behave now, lol

ROFLMBO!!! I shall never, EVER forget to twist a wick from now on!! Bet on me to vent any frustrations out on the poor things :laugh2:
No I misunderstood also. Off to read!
THANK YOU!!! Although, I wonder if I may have contributed to other people's confusion. This isn't the first time I've refered to directional improperly.
"Directional" refers to the flow of wax through the wick. Some wicks are non-directional, which means they do not have an "up" or "down"... Directional wicks only flow in one direction... For soy, a non-directional, coreless wick slurps up that thick wax better than do other wick types. Kinda like needing a bigger straw for a malt than you need for a diet coke...
That is a great illustration. And that explains the slurping noise I hear while testing my candles.
Stella, just want you to know how much most of us appreciate your input and help; it truly is priceless. Thank you.
Very true, I can't imagine what all I've learned from the Stellanator. I'd much rather openly confess my ignorance on candle issues here than have a customer educate me. Big thanks to Stella and everyone else who takes the time to share their knowledge here.
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I love reading Stellas' posts - always learn something new and this is one of them :)

I've a couple of the twisting wick threads, but have to ask a couple of things if I may lol In a pillar I can see how to twist and hold in place with a bit of wax - tip by Stella in another thread, but how would you do it in a container?? Twist and hold in place on the centering device?

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I generally twist in jars as well, which does tend to help a little. I twist the wick and then hold with a clothes peg, which for me works so much better than the centering tools for sale at various places, and is so much cheaper at 50 pegs for $2.50 at the reject shop.

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I generally twist in jars as well, which does tend to help a little. I twist the wick and then hold with a clothes peg, which for me works so much better than the centering tools for sale at various places, and is so much cheaper at 50 pegs for $2.50 at the reject shop.

Thanks Richard - that's what I meant :) I use the paddle pop sticks and use a paperclip to hold the wick in place... may not be enough pressure from the clip though if I want to twist as well, so will invest in some of the reject shop pegs as well me thinks :)

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so will invest in some of the reject shop pegs as well me thinks :)

Just make sure you get the extra large ones. They last a while and then the spring seems to go out of them a bit. Once that happens, soak in hot water and use for their intended purpose of hanging clothes on the line, rinse and repeat :)

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Twist and hold in place on the centering device?

Yep. Since the bottom is already secured, I use the bow tie style wick holders and just insert the wick and turn a few times. It tightens the bowtie onto the top so it stays in place and keeps the wick from untwisting... The cool thing about these is that one can use them in a variety of ways (not just the way illustrated in the photo in the link below - I single wick and use them the opposite way - very versatile) and the hole for the wick is like a keyhole - the wick holds very snugly in the smaller part of the keyhole. They can be used on a wide range of containers.

The bow ties look like this:

http://www.lonestarcandlesupply.com/products/candlemakingequipment_bow-tie-wick-bar.html

Once could effect this with popcicle sticks or any number of "homegrown" wick holders, but I truly love these bow ties or I'd make my own 'cause I'm cheap! LOLOL

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... but I truly love these bow ties
I love them too! Worth the price imo. I need to get a few more but local supplier is out of them.
Jonsie,

Yes, you can off-set the wick if you choose. I use primarily ECO wicks and have on many occasions set the wick a little off center to account for the curl. Twist or off-set - whichever works best for you.

Thanks, Pam. Although none of my customers questioned why my wicks were off-center (aesthetics seem to be low on their list), I really like the idea of it uncurling during burning to spread the melt pool around.

I still can't believe I didn't pick up on the twisting step before. Still so much to learn.

Edited by jonsie
typo
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I know what you are talking about jonsie and yes the arrows point up on my wicks. If I am using a single wick to make several wicks I keep the pattern the same. Don't know that it makes one bit of difference but I figured if it didn't the wicks wouldn't all look the same. There was an old thread on this and Top of Murray Hill had a good comment about it. HTH

Steve

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