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When labeling candles, do you include the specific wax you use? Such as, "100% Soy Wax" or "100% Vegetable Wax."

I had a conversation with a candle maker a few months ago who told me that if I put ANYTHING in my soy wax, I could no longer say that my candles were, "Soy Wax," but instead had to say, "Soy Blend, or "Soy/Paraffin Blend." Is there a point at which you can't say your candles are "all vegetable" or "100% Soy/Vegetable?"

I've looked on various websites but haven't found inci information for additives that I'm using (vybar, UA, color stabilizer/UV inhibitor.)

Thoughts?

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I don't sell my candles, but as a consumer I would want to know what my candles were. So if the candle was 100% Soy wax then I would want that on the label, if additives were used then I would want to know that by the label reflecting it. I do make 100% soy wax candles myself and of course always look at candles when I am out, can tell sometimes that the candles have additives and that peeves me off that it really is false advertising when in my opinion and additive negates the 100% soy wax definition. I have asked as well, much the discertion of the candle maker when I ask if they have additives and I tell them I think they are making a false claim.

Just my personal opinion.

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I would have to agree...If you are adding anything to the 100% soy wax, it really isn't 100% anymore.

By that reasoning, the only 100% soy candles are unscented and uncolored. Common sense tells me that only if you are adding another type of wax would it no longer be 100% soy. Color, FO, UV, etc. would not preclude labeling as 100% soy.

Cheers,

Steve

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"I did not have sex with that woman."

Depends on one's definition of "have sex", right? ;) But the IMPLICATION is quite different from the unvarnished truth, not to mention a heapin' helpin' of the sin of omission!

On my label, I list the candle ingredients in the order of their percentage in my mix.. NatureWax C3, for example, is labeled "premium vegetable wax" on the carton, so I put premium vegetable wax on the label. If I use other veggie oils in the mix (like coconut oil, for example), I add "vegetable oils". If I use USA, I could add "distilled monoglycerides", or lump both the USA & UV absorber as "wax & color stabilizers." I always list fragrance oils (or EOs, if appropriate) & dyes. I market my C3 candles as "scented vegetable wax candles."

So my label reads something like:

contains premium vegetable wax, fragrance oils, wax & color stabilizers, dye. In my product literature, I state that I use soy-based vegetable wax, REACH compliant dyes & wicks, braided cotton wick containing no metal, vegetable oils (if used) and essential oils (if the candle contains ONLY EO for scenting).

Each wax manufacturer has its requirement for using their brand name, but it's acceptable to say NatureWax or EcoSoya wax so the end user can look up the MSDS if they wish.

It is technically correct to say "made WITH 100% soy wax" because, after all, a parasoy does contain 100% soy wax in some percentage... :rolleyes2 Many folks do this to imply purity, or a more upscale, higher quality product. Of course, that's like certain bath & body product labels that state "contains essential oil" on the label without mentioning that its .000001% and the rest of the fragrance comes from fragrance oil. :rolleyes2TECHNICALLY, it's not a lie, but the implication is to lead the customer to think the product is somehow more pure, wholesome, higher quality and generally more wonderful than it really is... Folks who use this type of marketing often make liberal use of the terms "all natural," "100% pure," "eco-friendly," and other assorted marketing terms (100% organic composted animal fertilizer, IMHO). And all that's BEFORE we get to the "triple-scented" claims... :tiptoe:

To each his own. Caveat emptor has always been my motto as a customer, so I try to be factual to the best of my knowledge on my labels and in my product literature. HTH :)

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I think you have to put yourself in the shoes of the consumer. What do they think 100 percent Soy signifies? What are their reasonable expectations?

They know you have colorant and FO and glass and cotton. If the consumer has a reasonable expectation that a 100 percent soy candle is pure soy and not a parasoy blend, then that should be your guide (unless there are federal standards that you must abide by).

I would think that any consumer that gets a candle that is a parasoy blend with 100 percent soy on the label would feel that this was wrong.

I do like the idea of writing what waxes were used so that the consumer can go look the up if they want.

I also think there is a hermeneutic to phrases and words. Meaning always stays with the author so if "sex" means one thing to one person and something else to another, that's fine. Significance is something the listener decides and that's what counts in labeling or mislabeling situations.

That's why a certain former national figure was able to believe one thing in his mind and get suspended by the Alabama State Bar for the same thing. He can believe what he wants about the meaning of the word sex, but the rest of the world puts their own significance to it and when the two don't match, something's wrong.

Usually the majority wins in those situations so I'd just approach it from what the consumer expectation is.

Edited by EricofAZ
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I don't want anyone to misunderstand, my intent is NOT to mislead anyone by my labeling. I was asking more so about norms in the candle making world.

It seems a bit harsh to say that once you add anything (dye, fragrance, universal additive) to the wax it is no longer X or Y. Here's my thinking, I'm using a wax that is listed as "100% soy wax" by the supplier. I then add dye, fragrance and universal additive. Everything I've added accounts for 10% of the final pour. I'm not including the wick or container, because only the completely unreasonable person would think that the wick or container is soy. But, you never know for the sure the depths of unreasonableness some can go to. Anyway, so can I still label my candles as "Soy Candle" or "Made with Soy Wax?"

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"100% soy wax" by the supplier
Personally, I would be loathe to use the term "100%," because IMHO, that gets into the murky area of marketing hype that's designed to manipulate & obfuscate the customer's perception of the product. Some manufacturers are very up-front about their product descriptions (CalWax, Accublend, Elevance, Golden Brands, Strahl & Pitsch, Koster Keunen, C.J. Robinson), while others (Ecosoya, Enchanted Lites) dip deeply into hype. BTW, the supplier's description is not always the best reference for product information - the manufacturer's information is generally more accurate (if it has not been carefully infused with all-natural pure Kosher-grade expeller-pressed hyperbole reminiscent of organic fertilizer).
so can I still label my candles as "Soy Candle" or "Made with Soy Wax?"
There are no federal laws of which I am aware that state how much soy wax a candle must contain to be labeled as a "soy wax candle." Legally, there could be less than a teaspoonful... If you label your candle as Kosher or Organic, there are laws which govern the use of these terms; otherwise, it's like the wild, wild west out there - anything goes.
I was asking more so about norms in the candle making world.
The "norm" is no different from the "norms" of a bazaar in Casablanca. There is a wide range of viewpoints among candlemakers, suppliers & manufacturers about product labeling and marketing hyperbole.This is a matter where you must use your own personal ethics and judgment.
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Well, I love this board because the vast majority wants to do it right and not mislead. That's great.

Here's how I do my labels. I have 4 check boxes.

__Soy __Palm __Paraffin __Blend

If all I used was soy, whether 464 and C3 blend and additives, I check SOY.

If 25/75 paraffin and soy, I check both soy and paraffin and the blend box.

If I cut my palm with soy I check the palm and soy box and blend box.

If anyone wants to ask, I tell them what I made.

I do not include deminimis additives in the check boxes so if my colorant was a paraffin base chip, so be it.

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I refer only to the wax I use as being "all natural", which it is. I never refer to the entire candle as being all natural. So rather than saying, for instance, "all-natural soy candle", it's more like "made with all-natural soy wax, blah blah blah..."

Edited by Catlover
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I don't put color, fragrance or UVH on the label, does this need to be on there?

The only label requirement is the name/address of the manufacturer & the net weight of the product. The rest is optional. You are not required to put ANY list of ingredients on a candle unless it is used as a massage candle, then it goes by the cosmetic rules (FDA). You can include the ingredients if you wish, but there is no requirement to do so for candles.

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First off, I cracked up at Stella...Here I am really focused on this thread and then I read "I did not have sex with that woman" and I lost it! (Thanks for the laugh). :laugh2:Anyway...I have been working on my blends as well as good ole' plain paraffin by itself. We already label our soy (464) as soy. I don't put 100%, etc. When we get our blends down, we will put Soy Blend or Para/Soy Blend on our label. But, do any of you actually put Parrafin on your labels if it's simply paraffin? I don't think I have ever seen this on a candle label before. When we poured J50 a few years back, on the label we had our business info/graphics, scent, ounces, web addy. Just curious about what y'all do.

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on the label we had our business info/graphics, scent, ounces, web addy. Just curious about what y'all do

That is all I put. I really don't think the general public cares if we are using vybar, ua, usa, co or what not in our candles. All they are concerned with is if it burns good and smells good!

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Thanks Grama. I have to agree after this experience: While visiting in Ohio last week, we went into a large craft supply store. There in the middle of the store was a very large candle display. 8 oz Mason jar candles for $1.00. Really!!!???? $1.00!! Of course the $1.00 sign is drawing them to the display. But, we stood off in the distance watching for awhile. Not one person read the label. Not one. They looked at the scent, opened the jar, asked their "BFF" to "Ohhhhhh smell this one" and woolah...went into their cart. Now I'm sure if the price was higher, they wouldn't have gone in the cart so quickly. But the point is .... they didn't care if it was soy, a blend or paraffin. I'm not saying many don't read labels...just in this situation, they didn't care one way or the other. But still curious if others note paraffin on their labels.

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