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complete melt pool 45 min??


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Hi please help me I bought a soy kit from lonestar. It uses the nature C3, & a 2.5 inch jar. I forgot the brand of wick but my question is I used the wick they gave me with the kit, also the fragrance and color. I have been testing them and get a complete burn pool in 45 minutes. From what I read here correct me if I am wrong, with soy wax you should get a complete burn pool in a much longer time. 4-5 hours is this correct. For my size jar how long should it take for a complete burn pool. Oh I weighed my candle before I lit it and it weighed 10.5 oz. Thanks so much.

Joy:confused:

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Should take about 1 hour per inch of diameter... roughly. I prefer a little slower than that because I wick for the last third of a container. In other words, some initial hangup will catch up toward the end.

In other words, your container sounds very overwicked. Try coming down one or two sizes... HTH :)

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Well I called Lonestar and complained, I told them what happened and I just got a song and dance, they said that it worked well for them. I told them that the jar was even too hot to pick up and hold and that I got a melt pool in 45 minutes. I guess they don't care if the customer is satisfied or not. Last time I would purchase something there though!

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I don't believe it should take 4 to five hours to get a complete meltpool. 1 to 1-1/2 hour tops. It's not even reccommended that you burn a candle for more than 4 hours at a time.

It depends on the diameter of the candle!!! Yes it can take 4 hours to get a complete melt pool in soy wax. You have to test

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Should take about 1 hour per inch of diameter... roughly. I prefer a little slower than that because I wick for the last third of a container. In other words, some initial hangup will catch up toward the end.

In other words, your container sounds very overwicked. Try coming down one or two sizes... HTH :)

I agree....you dont need a torch for a good wick.;)

tootie

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I always get a melt pool about 1 to 1/2 hours. I mostly use the 8 ounce JJ. The 16 ounce country jar a little longer but to me it varies with different fragrances. Sometimes a little shorter time and sometimes longer. But if to long I would probably need to wick up. It would be tunneling.

I agree with JaquiO. 4-5 hours is a long time for a melt pool. The scent throw is at its best when there is a full melt pool and no one wants to wait 5 hours.

I am sure they would have to test what they sell in the kits but they must not. Since they told you this worked for them.

LynnS

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I always get a melt pool about 1 to 1/2 hours. I mostly use the 8 ounce JJ. The 16 ounce country jar a little longer but to me it varies with different fragrances. Sometimes a little shorter time and sometimes longer. But if to long I would probably need to wick up. It would be tunneling.

I agree with JaquiO. 4-5 hours is a long time for a melt pool. The scent throw is at its best when there is a full melt pool and no one wants to wait 5 hours.

I am sure they would have to test what they sell in the kits but they must not. Since they told you this worked for them.

LynnS

Ok I just want to see if I am reading this correctly. For an 8oz jj you get a FULL melt pool in 1/2 to 1 hours? Or even 1 to 1 1/2 hours? Isnt the jj 2 1/2 in diameter? Does you jar get really hot? Have you ever had one break?

Im sorry I am not trying to be rude I am just wondering how you do this. My DH aunt asked if I could wick up to get a full melt point sooner and I told her no it could be very dangerous. And also told her it would make the candle burn a lot quicker. Also I can still smell them even when they dont have a full melt point.

Thanks for any info you can give me.

Antonia

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I totally disagree with a full melt pool in 1-1 1/2 hrs with a JJ 2 1/2" width. About 2 1/2 hr with a 1/4-1/2 deep pool. I hate a hot jar. Candles will throw without a full melt pool and if wicking that hot it will be gone in no time. Seems like I just said what you said... The wick I used with a JJ was a CD 8 or 10 and they worked great. Call and see what wick they sent.

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It is intersting to see all the different opinions. It depends on different combos, what you the candle maker wants in your candles. It varies a little but 45 to an hour tops for a melt pool across the top(for us). We have never had a glass break. They do get warm, and if power burned can get hot! Of course thats our way we wanted our candles...everyone is different. LeeAnn~

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Again, I agree with Tootie, Circle, Antonia and Sharon.

Oh I weighed my candle before I lit it and it weighed 10.5 oz

Did you weigh the container first and subtract that from the total weight? Net weight is the important part. the Total weight of the candle and container is only important when approximating shipping costs.

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The reason this is important is because different containers have different weights, sizes, shapes, but the amount of wax inside them may be the same. Most scales used by candlemakers have a "tare" feature which allows you to place an empty container on it, tare (reset the scale to zero to exclude the weight of the container from the result), then put a filled container on it to weigh the actual amount of wax in the container. Otherwise, ya have to subtract the container weight from the filled container weight. Remember that if there is a lid on the container, that has a weight also, so be sure to include it when weighing the "empty" IF you have the lid on when weighing the filled container.

I use my scale when filling my containers so that I can standardize the amount of wax that goes into each container. "Eyeballing" isn't accurate. I set the empty, wicked container onto the scale, tare, then pour the amount of wax I have chosen for that container into it, stopping when I arrive at the correct amount. Takes a little practice not to go over or under.

When candles are labeled, the weight listed on the label is the net weight (ie. the amount of product inside the container, not the total weight of the container candle), so you will need to become familiar with this.

reading somewhere to weigh it before you do your burn and then again after

If you are testing and looking for the change in the weight after a burn (ie. how much wax was consumed within X amount of time using X size of X type of wick), weighing the container before and after would leave you with the correct amount of wax that was consumed, to give you your ROC/hour figure (rate of consumption per hour). Even if you had tared the scale after weighing an empty container, then weighed the filled one to get the net weight value, then followed the same procedure after the burn, the result would have been the same. Just depends on what you are trying to figure... ;) In this case, you got the right number. :) Do remember that the ROC/hour can change as a container candle burns down, so if this figure is important to you, remember to weigh each time until the candle is burned to the end, then average to get the ROC/hour figure for that particular container, wax blend, FO, wick & wick size combination.

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