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first time soy user


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I made some soy candle this evening from a kit and 2 of the six near the wick have a little cave in it looks as though somebody pushed down on it. What is the cause of this and what should I do to fix it. Is this when you use the heat gun that I have read about? Also how long do you let them cool before you put the cover on them overnight? Thank you for you help! Boy this is very complicated stuff here I thought it was going to be more simple. You need to have a not of patience and I need to learn more.:(

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It could be several reasons for the cracking, try pouring at a slightly lower temp and if you are pouring in a area of your home that is cooler (like a basement) after you pour your candles take a box and cover the candles while they are cooling, that slows down the cooling a little and may help the cracking problem. There are so many things that can effect your soy candle making. Your right about having patience, but keep trying and yes do alot of reading, and all candle makers will tell you that the most important thing is to test, test, test... but it is a fun and addictive hobby:rolleyes2

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I end up using a heat gun on almost all my candles (the exception is in the summer when it's really hot and things cool down slower on their own).

This is not really that unusual... most substances expand when they are hot (take up more volume) so they contract back down when they cool. Sometimes the deaded wetspots occur, sometimes you get a little sinking around the wick.

It's easy to make a candle, heck, stick a wick in a hole bunch of things and they'll burn. It's making a good, quality candle time and time again that's hard. ;) Good luck to ya!

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NatureWax C3 will cave in if cooled unevenly or poured too hot or cool. Place the candles on a rack to allow air circulation under them and cover with a box if there's a draft or the room temp is too cool. Space them evenly or the ones in the middle will cool more slowly and the ones on the outside will cool too quickly. In the winter, I cool mine in the oven (warmed to 150, then turned off when I put the candles inside).

Sure, heat guns can be used, but frequently they cause as many problems as they solve, especially with frosting. The surface is never the same after heat gunning as when the candle is poured at the right temp and cooled evenly. C3 has a flawless top when conditions are right. HTH :)

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