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question about soybean oil


vberkesch
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Soybean oil could be useful sometimes for making an adjustment to a recipe, but it's not good as a base oil for soaping.

The soft fatty acids in your recipe should be mostly oleic acid. That's what olive oil and some similar oils contribute. What you don't want is too much linoleic acid, which is primarily what you get from soybean oil.

Too much linoleic acid will result in a poorly balanced recipe with various bad characteristics. That includes increased drying, weird skin feel, odd smell, slow cure, and turning to mush in the shower. It can also make the soap more prone to DOS.

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Plus keep in mind a couple of points:

1. exact substitutions (i.e., those that will give you the exact same result) are basically non existant. there are a few close ones but soy-olive is not among them

2. the properties predicted by soapcalc.com and soapmaker and such may not be particularly accurate. there are things like superfat that cannot be taken into account. but as an initial guide they are ok.

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I would suggest subbing a bit of liquid soybean oil but not all. For me soybean oil makes a creamy stable bubbles. But the conditioning is not as good as olive oil is. Also high soybean oil can cause DOS. But just the right amount can make a creamier bar of soap. I would suggest around 10% but no more than 15% ;)

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I would suggest subbing a bit of liquid soybean oil but not all. For me soybean oil makes a creamy stable bubbles. But the conditioning is not as good as olive oil is. Also high soybean oil can cause DOS. But just the right amount can make a creamier bar of soap. I would suggest around 10% but no more than 15% ;)

What I would suggest we watch out for - and I think I see this a lot - is giving one oil credit for a property that may actually come from a synergy between oils.

I tentatively think that one effect of linoleic oils in soap is that they can magnify the properties of certain other fatty acids. For instance, a soap with only 20% lauric oils (coconut/pko/babassu) can be drying if it's high in linoleic acid. So it may be that soybean oil doesn't increase creamy lather by itself, but maybe amplifies the effect of stearic acid in the recipe.

I'm not positive why this happens, but since linoleic adds a "mush" factor it could simply be due to the soap dissolving more easily. Maybe also that linoleic mush doesn't interfere with lathering properties as much as oleic slime :).

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What I would suggest we watch out for - and I think I see this a lot - is giving one oil credit for a property that may actually come from a synergy between oils.

I tentatively think that one effect of linoleic oils in soap is that they can magnify the properties of certain other fatty acids. For instance, a soap with only 20% lauric oils (coconut/pko/babassu) can be drying if it's high in linoleic acid. So it may be that soybean oil doesn't increase creamy lather by itself, but maybe amplifies the effect of stearic acid in the recipe.

I'm not positive why this happens, but since linoleic adds a "mush" factor it could simply be due to the soap dissolving more easily. Maybe also that linoleic mush doesn't interfere with lathering properties as much as oleic slime :).

I am going to stick with my original post. I suggested only replacing a little olive with the soybean, but certainly not all or even half.

I would never go as far to say that liquid Soybean has a drying affect. It may not be as moisturizing as an oil with high oleic, but its certainly not drying. Remember we are talking about liquid soybean oil, which doesn’t have as much stearic as its hydrogenated sister types. True it is a soft oil and should be used at a low percentage, but it truly changes the density of the lather, adding a little fluff to the creaminess that you cant get from palm or hydrogenated soybean with higher stearic.

This is why I suggested using the liquid soybean oil in that other salt bar recipe. Salt bars have a lot of dense lather and its hard to get any fluff out of them, with the addition of the liquid soybean oil, you can get a much more fluffy lather.

I do believe that with the correct combination of oils used in correct amounts, each oil will not only compliment each individual’s strengths, but actually compensate and improve each individuals weakness. :wink2:

My favorite recipe uses 6 sometimes 7 different oils and I wont go less than 6. I am a veggie soaper though and I think that I am having to mix three different types of veggie ingredients in order to get all the benefits I could get from just Beef Tallow alone.

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That cheap makes you want to use it somewhere..

It's cheap but it goes stale quickly, so be careful how much you buy. You don't want to use a large percentage of it in a recipe, so it could end up sitting around. In case it helps, Crisco salad/cooking oil is soybean oil and comes in all sizes.

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