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Tempered (?) soy wax pics


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Since we got to talking about it, I've been messing around a little more with this tempering idea. I don't really know if that's what I'm doing, but I came up with a technique that seems to work OK. I'll play around more and see what else I can figure out.

These candles were made 2 or 3 days ago. The one on the left is straight GB 415, 7% FO, no additives. The one on the right is the same but with 1% Panalite. Both have smooth tops and no frost (for the time being). The most notable difference is the one with USA mostly separated from the glass. The one without additive is nicely adhered.

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Here's an interesting one. Straight GB 402, 7% FO and nothing else. There are a few faint spots of frost on the sides, none on top. I think I could get it down to zero. I've never poured 402 straight before so I'm not sure how difficult it's supposed to be to get a nice look. My impression is that you normally need additives.

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Top, let's just say we actually figured out exactly how to temper the stuff and managed to replicate the process. Would later storage conditions then send that work all to hades? Like if someone then took the candle, tossed it into the car on a winter day, brought it inside later and set it in the livingroom near the fireplace...

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Top, let's just say we actually figured out exactly how to temper the stuff and managed to replicate the process. Would later storage conditions then send that work all to hades? Like if someone then took the candle, tossed it into the car on a winter day, brought it inside later and set it in the livingroom near the fireplace...

I agree. Just like the way a chocolate bar does when it sits in a car and then someone puts it in a freezer, and we know the chocolate has already been tempered.

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Top, let's just say we actually figured out exactly how to temper the stuff and managed to replicate the process. Would later storage conditions then send that work all to hades? Like if someone then took the candle, tossed it into the car on a winter day, brought it inside later and set it in the livingroom near the fireplace...

It's an open question. I've made perfect-looking soy candles before, yet the aesthetics were too fragile to develop them as an upscale product.

What seems notable about these tempering experiments is (1) I found a method that's actually pretty fast, and (2) I got surprisingly good results using materials that are difficult to pour well without additives. Maybe there's a positive implication for stability if the wax formulation and procedure were to be optimized.

It seems the tempering thing (if that's what I'm doing) can be efficient, but doing it in small batches might end up being kind of a skill. You can't just use the thermometer. You have to handle the wax in a certain way and pay attention to the look and feel of it.

The business question of whether it's worth pursuing is still open too. God only knows how many months it would take to evolve these experiments into a great product. The alternative of adding some petroleum derived materials is arguably more sensible, as most candle companies seem to have concluded. For practical purposes it has no negative implications - it just eliminates the quality issues and allows the candles to be made in a conventional way.

You can argue there's a potentially profitable market niche for selling a soy candle that doesn't contain any petroleum derived materials. A company like Beanpod exemplifies that and they seem to have found a way to make the tempering and formulating work for them. I think the niche is overestimated though. A lot of it is created by crafters offering cheap soy candles and not making much money.

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but soy candles with paraffin added still frost like hell. Even as far as a 50/50 blend with straight paraffin and ecoysoya, there is still major frost issues, so adding paraffin doesn't solve the issue.

Not sure exactly what you tried, but most parasoy products on the market don't frost and create a stable product. However, combining an existing container wax with 50% straight paraffin most likely wouldn't produce a properly formulated blend.

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The texture on that candle is near flawless, Top - I mean we are talking babybutt smooooth there. I see that you used a red dye - was it liquid or dye chips? We have the most trouble with reds frosting, so your choice was a good one for a test... :)

It's a liquid dye.

I'm only getting started with this series of tests. Who knows where it will go. I can just see it now...

Beanpole Candles

Made with 100% mostly soy wax

Featuring our patent-pending Tempatantrum technology!

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Beanpole Candles

Made with 100% mostly soy wax

Featuring our patent-pending Tempatantrum technology!

:laugh2::laugh2::laugh2::laugh2:

I love that. 100% Mostly soy............. and Tempatantrum technology. I use that technology every time I mess with pure soy! I was unaware it was trademarked, LOL!

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:laugh2::laugh2::laugh2::laugh2:

I love that. 100% Mostly soy............. and Tempatantrum technology. I use that technology every time I mess with pure soy! I was unaware it was trademarked, LOL!

Ditto.

Top, I must say not only are you and educator - but a dry-witted comedian, too. Heck of a combination! Keep those babies coming...I appreciate every wry comment you make! :wink2:

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Kathy Ireland candles look ok, but they scent isn't strong. I would buy them for 3/$6.00 that is cheap.. How are these companies making any money....

I tried one of her candles...was not really that impressed and Im not really sure if they are 100% soy! Im sure her candles are mass produced in China or something so it cost nearly nothing to make.

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I tried one of her candles...was not really that impressed and Im not really sure if they are 100% soy! Im sure her candles are mass produced in China or something so it cost nearly nothing to make.

They say MADE IN THE USA.. Didn't get them but would love to pour in her jars. On line they have different jars so maybe they are discontinued.

Top, next summer, that's when I need your results, went nuts this year. And I know I will again next Summer. I do plan on putting an air conditionier in the window of pouring room. And keeping it on 68* the whole time, never open a window in there and see if it helps. I've got a good batch right now and the weather is cool so I'm cool.

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