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Hi - I'm new again, New Questions - Regarding SCENT.


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Hi Everyone! :wave:

I have been here before, but things came up, lost my computer for awhile, and now here I am back! lol

I think I only posted a handful of times.

At any rate. I'm glad to be back.

I just started making soy tarts. I'm sure I am not doing it right, but I have to learn somehow.

I for whatever reason only bought 6 tart molds. I learned my mistake QUICKLY after attempting to pour my first ones, when I scooped out and scented 2 Cups and only had 6 molds! :laugh2:

So, now I only scoop out 8 oz. of Wax at a time. I melt the entire bag in a kettle. (It's how I was told to do it, where I bought my stuff).

I'm wondering if I am adding too much scent, and it's just going to end up seeping out? Wouldve it seeped out by now? I poured them hours ago!

How much fragrance would you put in, 8 oz of wax?

I am using a "shot glass" with Ounce markings on it, and I'm using 1/2 an oz per 8 oz of soy wax.

Is that too much?

Go ahead and laugh.... :P I'm sure it's too much, after Ive been reading. LOL

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Does one weigh in ounces,grams,kilograms or milliliters....which is most accurate? What conversion tabels do you all use? Just curious...Does palm wax, when melted, create more liquid wax as does paraffin and soy wax? If so,how much more? This would help us all out(especially me:) ) to be more accurate when we pour and could leave us with just enough extra to top off any container if needed.

Mike

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Does one weigh in ounces,grams,kilograms or milliliters....which is most accurate?

Metric weight or US weight, doesn't matter. Just so long as you are measuring in units of weight and not of volume. Depending upon how many decimels your scale allows, it could be argued that measuring in grams would be the most accurate, but I think THAT would honestly be splitting hairs... well, parts of hairs... little bitty parts of little bitty hairs... :D

What conversion tabels do you all use? Just curious...

My scale allows me to measure in different units - I can choose grams, ounces, pounds & ounces, etc. I weigh in pounds & ounces when weighing my wax ('cause that's the only thing that'll ever amount to more than a pound with the capacity of my Presto) and ounces for the rest. If conversion is needed, any of the online conversion sites offer accurate conversions. I use http://www.onlineconversion.com/ when I need to do a conversion. I keep a bookmark for the temperature conversion page in my Candles bookmarks folder as I use it frequently. I also keep one to figure what % something is of something else, which I use a LOT!!

Does palm wax, when melted, create more liquid wax as does paraffin and soy wax? If so,how much more?

It doesn't matter much to me because I am pouring into the container by WEIGHT not fluid ounces. ;) When filling containers, I place the container on the scale, tare, then fill the container with the exact amount of wax my label states is 'spoze to be in there. Much easier than "eyeballing." Put a piece of plastic wrap over the scale to catch the inevitable drips.

This would help us all out (especially me:) ) to be more accurate when we pour and could leave us with just enough extra to top off any container if needed.

Mike

Mike, when estimating how much wax I will need to fill X number of containers, I weigh the container and tare. Then I add water to the line to which I want to fill the container and note the weight. Now remembering that water weighs more than wax (wax floats, 'member?), so I am actually overestimating slightly. This alone will leave me a little extra, but it might not be enough more to do second pours, etc., depending on what you have in mind.

I do not do second pours "on the fly." In other words, I don't fill a container, see a sinkhole and THEN decide to do a second pour to fix it, because I have already weighed the correct amount of wax in my container when I poured the candle. My labels are preprinted, so that if I state on the label that the candle contains 5 ounces net weight and I do a second pour, my label will be inaccurate - it will contain more than the label states. Some folks don't mind this, but I try to be accurate.

If one PLANS to do a second pour, using the example above, one could pour 4 ounces for the first pour and 1 ounce for the second pour and then the label net weight would be accurate.

HTH :)

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Hi all,

I'm more confused now than ever. :confused:

I do have a real nice scale. It's a digital, I bought back when I decided I was going to measure food and such, never did :)

Is there a post or link somewhere, that takes you through the directions of making a soy candle or tart?

I bought my supplies (soy wax, scents, colors, presto) at At Wix End.

The lady was real great (Jennifer) - and she helped me, and I thought I understood when I left, but I guess I didn't.

:tiptoe:

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Is there a post or link somewhere, that takes you through the directions of making a soy candle or tart?

If you go to google and type in, how to make soy candles.....there are MANY links to read to get a starting point. Read, read, and read some more until you think you understand the steps. You can then apply these to your own candle making for a place to start in your testing. Once you have gone through those 2 steps, it might become a little clearer than saying, how do I make a candle, how do I make a tart or reading a long drawn out conversation that may even confuse you more. Sometimes step by step instructions that are found on those links will help clarify your questions. :)

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Let me see if I can paint a picture...

you have two measuring cups, side by side. In one, you have 8 ounces of water. In the other, you have 8 ounces of feathers. Both are equal in volume. But, in weight, they are VERY different.

Apply this to candle wax, FO, etc. 8 ounces in volume is NOT equal to 8 ounces in weight.

This is what we mean when we say that 1/2 oz of FO, by volume, isn't the same as 1/2 FO by weight. Or as Stella said, 8 ounces of wax.

As far as what Grama said, when you freeze water, it expands. The chemical changes something goes through when it changes from one state to another (solid to liquid, liquid to solid, etc) change things a bit.

So, if you melt 16 ounces, by weight, of wax you get 20 ounces, by volume, of melted wax. (I'm not sure if soy wax gives you 20 ounces, by volume. I'm just using this as an example).

Did that help or simply make it worse?

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Stella, I was confused about the ......weight vs volume. I understood somewhat, but got confused about the scale thing, because I thought a measuring cup, was the same thing as a scale, just a different "way" of doing things. I'll explain further down in THIS post. :smiley2:

Jami - I agree, step by step are the easiest to understand! :cheesy2:

Tereasa, Thank you that did help more, and I think now that I read what you were saying, I think I "am" doing it right. Let me try to explain what I'm doing thus far - and you all can tell me if it's right. LOL

Okay here is what I'm doing. As a side note, I am ONLY doing this for personal candle use in MY home, and GIFTS for friends and family. So perfection, etc - is not the key here. I have no interest in making these to sell. It's just we use so many candles here in the house, that I figured it would be cheaper to make them myself, than buy them! LOL :rolleyes2 What is key, is the fact I don't "waste" oils and such, as they aren't cheap! :lipsrseal

Okay, I went to a candle supplier, and bought 5lb bag of Soy Wax (looked like white sugar), I bought 5; 1 oz scents, I bought 2; blocks of color dye, a thermometer, and a Presto Kitchen Kettle.

I came home, and poured the entire bag of dry wax in the Kettle. It turned to liquid form after awhile.

I had my Pyrex Measuring Cup, and I dipped out "liquid form", until my measuring cup said I had 8 ounces.

I then colored it. Then I added my Scent. Which I measured in LIQUID Form, in a unit measuring glass. I measured out, .5 (1/2 oz) ounces of Liquid Scent, Added that to my liquid 8 ounce of Wax.

Is that the right formula or still no? Or does that not make sense either?

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When you measure your liquid wax into your pyrex glass you need to weigh it rather than look at the 8 oz measure on the side of the cup. Same is true for your FO. So take your pyrex cup, put it on the scale and tare it (zero out the weight). take another cup and scoop your liquid wax out of the pot and into your cup on the scale until you have 8 oz in weight on the scale. measure your FO the same way and add it to your liquid wax. hth

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Okay!! :yay:

I think I understand WHAT to do now. I didnt think "I" was making sense, therefore, not getting the right answers. You know?

But, I do have ONE more, more of a "curious" question.

Why do you have to put it on a scale, as opposed to a measuring cup??

I mean, liquid measured in a cup, to 8 ounces, SHOULD weigh 8 Ounces, Shouldn't it?

---Disclaimer: I am not QUESTIONING you, I believe You. I am just curious, for the sake of learning something new! :cheesy2:

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Guest Candelishis

NO - 8 oz in a measuring cup does not WEIGH 8 oz.

1/2 cup, or 4 oz of concrete will weigh more than 1/2 cup, or 4 oz of water.

You work with candle making ingredients by weight, not volume. Volume is how much space something takes up (4 oz of water takes up 1/2 cup of space in a measuring cup.). Those kind of ounces are FLUID ounces. It's just another way of saying that it's 1/2 cup. Fluid ounces measure the volume of something - or how much space it takes up. Regular ounces, that you measure on a scale, are used to tell you how much something weighs, not how much space it takes up.

That 1/2 cup of concrete is 4 FLUID OUNCES, but probably WEIGHS 10 ounces on a scale. Same with wax.

I hope this helps you and does not confuse you further.....

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NO - 8 oz in a measuring cup does not WEIGH 8 oz.

1/2 cup, or 4 oz of concrete will weigh more than 1/2 cup, or 4 oz of water.

You work with candle making ingredients by weight, not volume. Volume is how much space something takes up (4 oz of water takes up 1/2 cup of space in a measuring cup.). Those kind of ounces are FLUID ounces. It's just another way of saying that it's 1/2 cup. Fluid ounces measure the volume of something - or how much space it takes up. Regular ounces, that you measure on a scale, are used to tell you how much something weighs, not how much space it takes up.

That 1/2 cup of concrete is 4 FLUID OUNCES, but probably WEIGHS 10 ounces on a scale. Same with wax.

I hope this helps you and does not confuse you further.....

It does help, Thank you! I understand now, completely!

Thank you again everyone! I'm so excited - takes me a bit, lol, thanks for being patient with the ole' lady! :P

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