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Thermometer reads 235 in boiling water??


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I have been having some trouble with FO leaking out of Glass Glow even at 5%, so CandleScience said that maybe my thermometer is inaccurate. It doesn't go down to 32*, so I boiled some water to test. If water boils at 212* then I am guessing my thermomter shouldn't read 235*???:confused:

ETA - I was careful not to touch the side or bottom of the pot.

Thanks,

Jenn

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Miss Mary, the practical answer is no. At normal atmospheric pressure, water cannot exceed 212°F because when it does, it turns into steam. If you put a cup of water in a 600° pizza oven, the highest temperature the water will reach is 212°, then it turns into steam.

For a REALLY technical and far more confusing discussion of boiling points:shocked2:, here's what Wikipedia had to say...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling_point

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I was thinking like Mary, but never considered the evaporation angle ... although, it would still seem logical (at least in my simple mind) that the transformation from water to steam would create an increase in local temp & produce a higher reading. Don't trust me, though, I have the grades to prove I'm not a rocket scientist!

Back to the wax -- what would a faulty temp reading have to do w/ fo leaking from wax? If you're weighing all ingredients & using an acceptable amount of fo pp of wax, then a (possible) 23 degree difference in temp shouldn't be a reason for leakage. I don't work w/ this wax, but w/ others I've used, I've heard users citing the temp they add fo varying up to 50 degrees. Even if you add the fo at a temp too low to fully bind it to the wax, proper stirring would incorporate it & prevent the weigh of the fo sinking to the bottom/seeping out. Is the fo seeping from the whole candle, or just at the bottom? If it's seeping from the top, then it's not an issue w/ proper mixing. I know the manufacturer has usage instructions, but all of us work on either side of these instructions w/ results that work. Seepage usually points to using too much fo for the wax to hold. I obviously missed a thread on this, so just questioning the temp theory. Is the issue that the wax is possibly being heated too high & breaking down its ability to remain stable?

Susan.

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Back to the wax -- what would a faulty temp reading have to do w/ fo leaking from wax? If you're weighing all ingredients & using an acceptable amount of fo pp of wax, then a (possible) 23 degree difference in temp shouldn't be a reason for leakage. I don't work w/ this wax, but w/ others I've used, I've heard users citing the temp they add fo varying up to 50 degrees. Even if you add the fo at a temp too low to fully bind it to the wax, proper stirring would incorporate it & prevent the weigh of the fo sinking to the bottom/seeping out. Is the fo seeping from the whole candle, or just at the bottom? If it's seeping from the top, then it's not an issue w/ proper mixing. I know the manufacturer has usage instructions, but all of us work on either side of these instructions w/ results that work. Seepage usually points to using too much fo for the wax to hold. I obviously missed a thread on this, so just questioning the temp theory. Is the issue that the wax is possibly being heated too high & breaking down its ability to remain stable?

Susan.

Susan,

No the problem (or possible problem) is not that the wax is being overheated. It is just the opposite. And I haven't had the leakage problem with every candle I have poured, which speaks to your point about varying from manufacturers' instructions still with good results. The issue I am having is with Glass Glow palm, and CS suggests heating to 200* then adding FO, color, then pouring. I have been doing that, and several candles, even when poured at 5% (which is the recommended load for this wax) were collecting at the bottom of the jar. CS had suggested checking my temp as that might be the cause of my problem. So, if my thermomoter is, in fact, off 23*, then I am adding FO at approximately 178*.

In any event, I am going to have to get me a new thermometer, which I will of course check against the old one...still don't know about the whole water vs steam issue with checking temps though!

Jenn

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Well, after 6yrs, I don't use a thermometer anymore, but I do pull one out from time-to-time to check things out. I think all of us find our settings are 'off', but you learn to adjust up or down. If you *think* you're running on the low side, why not heat the wax to a thermometer setting of 225 to see what it does for you. Are you adding your fo when your wax is at its hottest setting, or waiting till you cool down? I always add hot, to bind it. Since your fo is sinking & it doesn't happen every time -- I'd guess you may not be stirring well enough, but that's just my guess. Do you stir for a full 3mins when the wax is heated? I stir every time I look at my wax! Again, I don't use this wax, but I've found most people miss a good hot throw by not adding the fo at a higher temp or not stirring well enough.

Susan.

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Wow, Susan...I couldn't imagine doing it without a thermometer, even if it is off! I add my FO at what I thought was 200*, I stir for 2 minutes using a wire whisk, so I do think it must be the temp...anyway, until get a new thermomoter I will add 20-25* using the same scents I had trouble with to determine if the temp WAS the problem.

Thanks everyone for your input!

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Don't get me wrong -- I in NO way advocate 'winging it' w/ temp! I've been working w/ the same wax that long & know where to set my Presto dial to get the temp I need. I know the Presto reading isn't accurate & adjust accordingly. I've come to know the right temp for pouring from the way the wax looks. Just last wk I questioned myself & pulled the thermometer out to verify pouring temp. I was proud to find out I guessed what the thermometer verified. If I was working w/ a new wax I would have a thermometer front & center! Good luck testing -- I hope the Patron Saint of Candles smiles on you! BTW -- is there a Patron Saint of Candles?!?!

Susan.

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There is...who knew??

ST. BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX

St_BernardofClairvaux.jpg PATRON SAINT OF: Chandlers (candle-makers), beekeepers, bees, Gibraltar, Queens College Cambridge, wax-melters, wax refiners

GUIDANCE: French nobility. At age 22, fearing the ways of the world, he, four of his brothers, and 25 friends joined the abbey of Citeaux; his father and another brother joined soon after. Benedictine. Founded and led the monastery at Clairvaux which soon had over 700 monks and 160 daughter houses. Revised and reformed the Cistercans. Advisor to, and admonisher of, King Louis the Fat and King Louis the Young. Attended Second Lateran Council. Fought Albigensianism. Helped end the schism of anti-Pope Anacletus II. Preached in France, Italy, Germany. Helped organize the Second Crusade. Friend and biographer of Saint Malachy O'More. Spritual advisor to Pope Eugenius III, who had originally been one of his monks. First Cistercian monk placed on the calendar of saints. Proclaimed a Doctor of the Church by Pope Pius VIII.

Every morning Bernard would ask himself, "Why have I come here?", and then remind himself of his main duty - lead a holy life.

FEAST DAY: August 20

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The boiling temp. of water can vary depending on your altitude and barometric pressure. Water boils at 212*F or 100*C at sea level with a barometric pressure of 29.92 in of mercury. The higher your elevation and lower your barometric pressure, the lower the boiling point of water and vice-versa. Try putting water in a pressure cooker with a thermometer and see how hot the water gets.

Here's a good calculator to get an estimate of your corrected boiling temp. http://www.csgnetwork.com/prescorh2oboilcalc.html

It doesn't take into consideration your elevation but barometric pressure is more important because the higher your altitude, typically, the lower your barometric pressure is. You can easily find your barometric pressure by going to your local news web site's weather section. Barometric pressure is more important because it all has to do with vapor pressure. Think of the air above you as a weight pressing down. The more the air weighs, the harder it is for the water vapor to release and that builds up the temp.

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So, if my thermomoter is, in fact, off 23*, then I am adding FO at approximately 178*.

AND if your FO lowers the wax temperature X°, you are pouring way too cool for palm wax. I don't pour palm at less than 185° (if I want good results with the crystallization pattern). This may not be so critical for some waxes, but it matters with palm. Stirring a LOT is very important. some FOs are harder to get totally stirred in than are others. Get a novel and read a chapter while you stir... Slow down and make sure all the factors are correct! ;)

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