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melting wax with a gas stove


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Yeah, double boiler it. I use an old aluminum saucepot that I set my pour pot down in. I have a metal cookie cutter in the bottom of the aluminum saucepot so the pour pot has some extra cushion space between it and the heat source.

I would love to have a presto pot but I don't have anybody to install the spigot. :(

Darbla

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Yeah, double boiler it. I use an old aluminum saucepot that I set my pour pot down in. I have a metal cookie cutter in the bottom of the aluminum saucepot so the pour pot has some extra cushion space between it and the heat source.

I would love to have a presto pot but I don't have anybody to install the spigot. :(

Darbla

Darbla, the spigot is optional - you can get along just fine without it!

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I use an old large spaghetti pot as a double boiler. It has a strainer pot that sits inside. Don’t use your good cookware. Goodwill and Salvation Army are good places to look for cheap old pots.

I tried a Presto Pot as a double boiler but it let off too much steam. It’s better to have a double boiler on the stovetop with the air duct above. Presto Pot is great with a spigot. You can find already modified ones on eBay. Well worth the investment if you plan on making a lot of candles.

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Oooooo! So you spigotless guys just dip the wax out then? Like with a metal measuring cup or similar?

Exactly. I mean, I have three prestos, and I just use small ladles to scoop directly from them into the molds. A lot of people use the pyrex measuring cups to dip from the presto into pour pots, etc.

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Thanks for the help. I'm a small hobbyist, not a retailer, so I will have to think on whether this is really going to make a difference for me. I usually clean my pour pot that I use on the stove by pouring the hot water from the bottom pot into it, and that does a great job of cleaning it. I won't be able to clean that easily with the presto. It'll be wiping out the hot presto and trying to keep from getting singed, and using up paper towels (expensive (I count every penny; sorry!) and bad for the environment).

Mainly I'm debating on whether electricity to run the presto is going to be less than gas on the stove. Any ideas on that? If it's cheaper to run the presto, I'd definitely go with that. The $20 initial cost would be recouped with time.

Darbla

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I tried a Presto Pot as a double boiler but it let off too much steam.
Jacqui, you don't use the Presto as a double boiler - the wax goes directly into it. Run dust it off and check it out! :)
So you spigotless guys just dip the wax out then?

You got it! I use ladles. I have tiny ones for little jobs and larger ones for transferring large amounts of wax to pour pots. I can also pour directly from the Presto (it has nice handles) if it is half-full or less. Of course, it kinda goes without saying that one should do all this dipping and pouring and stuff over newspaper...

While a spigot might be nice, I viewed it as one more thing to possibly leak, get stopped up, etc. Now folks who use them have no problems and love them, but they are not a necessity.

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I do all 3. 1 presto w/spigot, 1w/o and one with water for double boiler. I use the spigot when I do canes, its easier. The other one I use for whatever and ladel the wax out. So anyway can work. But it melts much, much faster in the presto. HTH

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Guest Candelishis
I would love to have a presto pot but I don't have anybody to install the spigot. :(

Darbla

If you're willing to pay about $35 bucks for the whole setup, there is a guy on Ebay who puts spigots on them and sells 'em. Or just find a dude you know who is relatively handy and owns a drill. It's super easy to make yourself.

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Thanks for all the info!

I went digging in my kitchen storage area and, lo and behold, I found one! It's my husband's but not anymore. :naughty: That is, IF I can get this one clean enough. I've been scrubbing in it with hot soapy water off and on for the last 30 minutes or so, and I'm not sure it's really going to get clean enough for me to use it for candles. (Kind of funny that I would think it was still appropriate to eat food cooked in it but not clean enough for making candles......)

Anybody resuscitated a used one and been able to use it for candles?

Darbla

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Thanks for all the info!

I went digging in my kitchen storage area and, lo and behold, I found one! It's my husband's but not anymore. :naughty: That is, IF I can get this one clean enough. I've been scrubbing in it with hot soapy water off and on for the last 30 minutes or so, and I'm not sure it's really going to get clean enough for me to use it for candles. (Kind of funny that I would think it was still appropriate to eat food cooked in it but not clean enough for making candles......)

Anybody resuscitated a used one and been able to use it for candles?

Darbla

If you can't get that one in the shape you want it in, check thrift stores or yard sales. Sometimes you can find them at these places that are really clean.

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I use a crock pot to melt my wax and dip out of there into my pyrex measuring cups, then I never have to clean the pot unless I want to use a different kind of wax. You can't adjust the temp, but I leave it on low and adjust in my cups as needed. HTHs

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Forgive me if I seem dense but I dont quite understand how a Presto Pot or a turkey fryer for that matter are different or safer than a stove top.

I do understand that the Presto has the thermostat, I just think that watching the wax thermometer yourself is more accurate and effective.

Wax doesnt boil so it just continues to get hotter so long as heat is applied so I very clearly understand the need to closely watch your melting wax.

Clearly if you plan on pouring at a specific temperature I dont see where this should be a problem. Wax's flash point is way above any recommended pour temps and varies with the blend.

Wax vapor doesnt ignite until you light the wick which burns at a starting temp of about 500F.

Having said all of that I have been melting wax on my gas stove top(on low) for years if not decades without a single incedent. I think it more important to watch it closely.

If I am wrong, please feel free to correct.

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Oh-MYo...I started off using the DB method and could never ever keep my wax at the right temp. I was constantly turning turning up the heat, turning down the heat, and when timing is everything in candlemaking, you really need to be able to keep your wax at the right temp consistently. A presto pot does this and that is why so many ppl favor them over the DB method. And the wax melts so much faster, which is nice too.

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OhMyo, I understand where you are coming from - a burner is a burner is a burner, right? With gas, even though it may be turned down, there is always a source of heat, same with electric burners (can't speak to the fancy magnetic induction thingys). In a Presto, the element heats only until the temperature on the thermostat is reached, then it shuts off until the temp drops below the set temp, then it comes back on again.

There is no reason one could not use any method of heating including a wood stove or campfire so long as they are able to regulate the temperature and stir the wax so that it doesn't get hotter nearer the source of heat than anywhere else in the pot.

For convenience and safety reasons, it is preferable to me to use a thermostatically controlled melter. I am FREQUENTLY interrupted while pouring and the chances for me to forget the wax are large. If I have to throw a dog or kid in the bathtub unexpectedly, I can dial down the temp so the wax will be "held" just above the melting point. Sure is a great thing for space cases who tend to wander off, distracted by a nearby butterfly... :embarasse ... only to "awaken" some time later, remembering,

HOLY HOUSE FIRE, BATMAN!! The WAX!! *faint*

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Jacqui, you don't use the Presto as a double boiler - the wax goes directly into it. Run dust it off and check it out! :).

Dust it off? I put spigots on those babies.

You can use a Presto as a double boiler. It comes with a nifty basket you can use. I just don't like it. Without the spigot- I don't even want to imagine the mess of trying to ladle wax out.

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You can use a Presto as a double boiler. It comes with a nifty basket you can use. I just don't like it. Without the spigot- I don't even want to imagine the mess of trying to ladle wax out.
The basket is for frying. You would have to put a container for the wax inside of the basket... awkward at best.

Ladling or scooping is no more messy than is pouring from a spigot - simply a matter of preference and skill with using ladles and preparing your workspace for easy cleanup. I seldomly spill a drop and for insurance, I hold the pouring pot or container to which I am transferring the wax directly over the Presto so any spills go right back in the pot. :rolleyes2 Just like spaghetti sauce - if the plate of pasta is held over the pot of sauce, any drips go onto the pasta. :)

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You are so right, SC! Even though the Prestos I use for melting wax have never been dialed beyond 200°, I NEVER trust a thermostat! It goes without saying that one should keep a thermometer in the melting pot at all times and check it frequently. I use a candy thermometer for this because it has a clip which my digitals don't have.

Hey... I wonder if one could install a thermometer into the side of a Presto (similar to the retrofitted spigot) like the ones installed into BBQ grills? Hmmmm...... ;) Now THAT would be HANDY!!!:yay:

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