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Do tarts need to cure once made? If so for how long?


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I had to reply to this because I definitely notice a difference in hot throw between a cured tart and a freshly made one. I made them from a paraffin pillar blend. If a strong tart is made it has a great cold throw right out of the mold. In couple of weeks that cold throw will lessen considerably. That’s how you know it has cured.

A simple way to test the difference: take 2 tarts from the same batch. Melt the 1st one right away and put it in a large room, the kitchen or bedroom for instance. Wait for 30 minutes. From a distance from the warmer see how strong the room smells. Try the other one in a couple of weeks. Then you’ll know the answer to your question.

Good Luck,

Jacqui

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I had to reply to this because I definitely notice a difference in hot throw between a cured tart and a freshly made one. I made them from a paraffin pillar blend. If a strong tart is made it has a great cold throw right out of the mold. In couple of weeks that cold throw will lessen considerably. That’s how you know it has cured.

A simple way to test the difference: take 2 tarts from the same batch. Melt the 1st one right away and put it in a large room, the kitchen or bedroom for instance. Wait for 30 minutes. From a distance from the warmer see how strong the room smells. Try the other one in a couple of weeks. Then you’ll know the answer to your question.

Good Luck,

Jacqui

HUH???

I've never heard of this concept in the 6 years I've been pouring candles and tarts.

If your tarts have a weak or no cold throw how can you expect customers to buy them if they can't smell them?

I must be really missing something here. I have tarts that I made for myself last Christmas and have had one sitting in my tart burner since then...unwrapped...and it still has a good cold throw. According to your theory then this tart is still not cured?

Maggie

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HUH???

I've never heard of this concept in the 6 years I've been pouring candles and tarts.

Have you been reading here? People recommend allowing soy waxes and other vegetable waxes to cure quite frequently.

If your tarts have a weak or no cold throw how can you expect customers to buy them if they can't smell them?

I think the whole idea is to allow the FO to cure into the wax for a few days - some folks think veggie waxes have better hot throw if allowed to cure even longer!

I must be really missing something here. I have tarts that I made for myself last Christmas and have had one sitting in my tart burner since then...unwrapped...and it still has a good cold throw. According to your theory then this tart is still not cured?

Duh! Your tart has been curing since last Christmas! According to the theory, it should be well-cured! You really ARE missing something here - like tact.:undecided

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Sorry Stella, but YOU missed it!! According to JacquiO, she stated that when the cold throw is basically gone, then you know your tarts are cured. Maggie was telling her that is totally not a correct statement and I have to agree with her.

The cold throw disappearing has absolutely nothing to do with whether your candles/tarts are cured. Yes most everyone knows that the longer your candles/tarts sit and cure the scent throw should be better. BUT, you should still have a good cold throw after 2 weeks also. Maggie was saying that some of her older tarts still have a good cold throw and if she applied JacquiO's logic, they wouldn't be cured yet.

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Wow Stella, a little harsh, don't ya think. She has a right to her opinion, just as you do.

I think if a tart has lost it's cold throw it's stale, not cured. I simply do not believe that when the scent is gone it is cured. That is just crazy. If the cold throw were to just go away when it was done curing then I have a couple of pillars from 5 years ago that are still not cured. I can still smell them.

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Uh Stella......

I'd say you have no tact either.

I've been using soy and soy paraffin blends for a LONG time so I do know all about candles curing.

And you missed the point about my tart altogether...DUH. As was pointed out to you by ChrisR and Carrie.

I don't think it's worth my while to point it out again.......

Maggie

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Wow Stella, a little harsh, don't ya think. She has a right to her opinion, just as you do.

I think if a tart has lost it's cold throw it's stale, not cured. I simply do not believe that when the scent is gone it is cured. That is just crazy. If the cold throw were to just go away when it was done curing then I have a couple of pillars from 5 years ago that are still not cured. I can still smell them.

I totally agree Carrie!

I just don't understand JaquiO's theory at all!

I can guarantee that if my tarts or candles did not have a STRONG cold throw when someone picked it up, they would not be buying them, not to mention the fact, that I would NOT be selling them in the first place.

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According to JacquiO, she stated that when the cold throw is basically gone,.

I don't know how "lessen considerably" translated as "basically gone". That's not what I was getting at.

All I was saying is that you would notice the difference once they've cured just by the way they smell. I've made and sold thousands of tarts. Of course you can still smell them cold but I think that there is a noticeable difference from how they smell when I bag and label them straight from the molds from when I pull one off the wall several weeks later to show to a customer.

All I was saying is that cold tart smell is less strong when they are cured then they do when they are freshly made. But once they are cured the hot throw is sooo much better. I've had customers that bought recently made votives or tarts come back and complain they don't smell them when they burned them. I tell them wait another week and try one again if you still have the same problem I'll refund. They come back to say "oh you were absolutely right, they smell so strong now!" No one has ever asked for a refund. Most of the time I try to tell them when they are purchasing from a new batch.

That's my experience take it for what its worth.

Also the tarts I made were paraffin. I'm in the process of switching to soy. That will be an adventure of which I'm totallt clueless.

Thanks Stella for sticking up for me.

Best,

Jacqui

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Also the tarts I made were paraffin. I'm in the process of switching to soy. That will be an adventure of which I'm totallt clueless.

I thought you must have been making soy (or a blend) tarts.

I find anything I make with paraffin has no need for "curing" at all. In fact, I'll make a candle and as soon as it's set up, test it!

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I find anything I make with paraffin has no need for "curing" at all. In fact, I'll make a candle and as soon as it's set up, test it!

Well that's fine and all. But if you just made the candle doesn't the fragrance still permeate your house.

My house will smell for days after making candles.

Is curing is real or is it a myth? Id love to take a poll.

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I think that there is a noticeable difference from how they smell when I bag and label them straight from the molds from when I pull one off the wall several weeks later to show to a customer.

It could be as simple as the type of bag you are using... If your using a regular type plastic bag your scent will go away just because of using that type of bag. Most chandlers know that but Im always surprised by how many dont. Bruce

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Nope never had to cure my paraffin tarts or candles........great throw from the start. With my parasoy blends if I don't get a good throw within 48 hours, I won't use the FO. I refuse to make any customer wait 2 weeks to burn one of my candles......that's just idiotic!! :cool2:

Good one Sliver!! :D

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I use a paraffin blend and have never cured them on purpose. I do try to make them ahead of time because of shrink-wrapping. It takes some time for some fragrances to saturate thru the wrapping so that you can smell it well. Many times I have made a batch of tarts and immediately tested one out in my warmer and it threw great. I make mine strong, though.

When I want to try out a new FO real quick, just to see if I like the scent, I

will melt plain wax in my warmer, add a few grams of FO, and never have a problem smelling it, unless it's just a weak FO to begin with. I haven't made any soy tarts, so can't comment on those. I just checked some leftover tarts from last Christmas and can still smell them (cold throw) just as well. I had them stored in a #5 container. I will have to test a couple in my warmer, though, before I put them out to sell this Christmas.

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It could be as simple as the type of bag you are using... If your using a regular type plastic bag your scent will go away just because of using that type of bag. Most chandlers know that but Im always surprised by how many dont. Bruce

Good point Bruce.

Someone had posted on the old TSR a good way to remember is the word PRO. Polypropylene is good...polyethylene will absorb the scent.

Maggie

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what cter is bsing us. anybody that has supposedly made & sold thousands of tarts would all ready know the answer to that question/statement or what ever it was.

Absolutely right on CarolK! To say a tart that has 'considerably less' cold throw over time is a properly CURED tart is ridiculous! I know I sure wouldn't be shooting for tarts with LESS cold throw--nope---I'd be going for the strong cold throw over time!

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