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Taking orders vs stocking


AAngels
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I try to keep as much stock on hand as I can! Not only because of the wholesale orders and shows but because shipped orders turn around time is much quicker and looks much better to a customer in another state! Customer service is key!:highfive:

It also help when I have to pour for a show! Less work less often!

The only time I allow stock to drop is after the holidays and before doing end of the year taxes.

Fire

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I think it depends on what type of business you have or are trying to achieve. Up until this year, I poured orders as they came in, and in Sept - December, poured for craft shows and holiday gifts as needed. This year my customer list is growing, so I need to have stock on hand, so each weekend I pour more, and I try to make at least one gift basket per weekend so that I'm not rushing around during the holidays. When I first started, I worked my butt off testing so many fragrances, etc. just so that I could have alot of choices, over the years I've learned that's not always necessary. I've limited my selection 3-6 scents choices per scent category.

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I like to keep stock on hand, simply because it (in theory) takes as long for me to pour one pillar, vs pouring ten at the same time.

Ditto this. Plus, keeping an inventory allows me to take better charge of my daily schedule, as opposed to having the customer in charge.

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I keep a small stock too as I just started selling recently. I have quite a scent list inventory going but quantities of each are limited until I get things built up. I keep 2 of each in stock at the present time, then replace the stock as they sell. Plus I enjoy trying several new scents and until I settle on particular ones to carry full time I don't want to go overboard on quantity of each. You know how it is with all new businesses - have to start out slow and build up.

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I'm on the flip side, I pour as orders come in.

I figure this is more cost effective for me, because this way, I am not wasting wax on scents that may not sell for a very long time, or the scent is wanted in soap but not wax, and I've used up some of it in wax and will have to get more to use it in other places.

Doing it this way for me ensures that what I make is what is wanted and I don't have piles of stuff stacking up that may just never sell, or I'll have to have a sale to get rid of.

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I'm on the flip side, I pour as orders come in.

I figure this is more cost effective for me, because this way, I am not wasting wax on scents that may not sell for a very long time, or the scent is wanted in soap but not wax, and I've used up some of it in wax and will have to get more to use it in other places.

Doing it this way for me ensures that what I make is what is wanted and I don't have piles of stuff stacking up that may just never sell, or I'll have to have a sale to get rid of.

You could give the "non sellers" as samples with your order, then they may become sellers..

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So far its sounds as though its personal preference. I have to start out slow, so maybe a little on the shelf and the rest orders, because then I can get the money up front to cover those personal orders.

I am trying out new scents and have people testing them for me now. But I also found out that people all like of course, different scents. But my main testing is the burning down to the bottom and how it throws the scent.

I don't want to get to crazy with all the scents as I can tell I could with so many choices. The biggest season is coming up soon, so I am concentrating on my brochure and changing it up and promoting it too. I have a customer list already due to candles I have sold in the past, so that should help a little.

I have decided to try something different with my soy candles too, a recycle program, to turn back the jars, so I can reuse them too and give them a certain amount off according to the size of the jars.

I love all your ideas!!:yay:

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I have decided to try something different with my soy candles too, a recycle program, to turn back the jars, so I can reuse them too and give them a certain amount off according to the size of the jars.

Just curious...are you going to be using the "used candle jars" for personal use and testing, or do you plan on selling in them again? I get very nervous about refilling jars for people that have already burned a candle in it...I don't know if they have dropped the jar, power-burned in it, etc. Just something to think about....:)

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You could give the "non sellers" as samples with your order, then they may become sellers..

That's true, but if you end up with say 40 non-sellers over time that costs $3.00 each to produce, giving them away is $120 lost outright, let alone time to produce and any profits. :( To me, that stuff adds up very quickly. A nickel here and a dime there, can leads to thousands later (or something like that... can't remember that saying).

And if you give them away because eventually they may become sellers, then you never know if it will last or just a spurt because of what you gave away and then start all over again. :)

(Not trying to sound mean or anything, I'm just stating how I think about it, which is probably crazy to most! :D)

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These are glass candle jars, with soy only in them. I will sterilize them and reuse them for pouring again. If you think about it. Most jars get recycled especially if they are canning jars.

Most of my soy candles will be in mason jars. I will probably be doing .50, .75, 1.00 off their next orders. Depending on the size of the jars.

Don't know how long I will be doing this, but thought I would try it at the beginning to see how it goes. :yay:

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I try to keep as much stock on hand as I can! Not only because of the wholesale orders and shows but because shipped orders turn around time is much quicker and looks much better to a customer in another state! Customer service is key!:highfive:

It also help when I have to pour for a show! Less work less often!

The only time I allow stock to drop is after the holidays and before doing end of the year taxes.

Fire

Yeah, what Fire said! :grin2:

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These are glass candle jars, with soy only in them. I will sterilize them and reuse them for pouring again. If you think about it. Most jars get recycled especially if they are canning jars.

Most of my soy candles will be in mason jars. I will probably be doing .50, .75, 1.00 off their next orders. Depending on the size of the jars.

Don't know how long I will be doing this, but thought I would try it at the beginning to see how it goes. :yay:

Been there - tried this. Gave it up real quick - and I'm one that prefers to recycle!! Cleaning and reusing sounds easier than it is; taking old labels off; getting all the old wax out that might still be left in the jar (for whatever reason); chipped jars, etc. AND people still expected a discount on the next order even if I couldn't use the jars they were returning. Don't mean to be discouraging - you may have better luck (and more patience!!)

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AND people still expected a discount on the next order even if I couldn't use the jars they were returning.

So right you are! We used to offer a small discount to people who returned containers (this wasn't with candles, but with other products we sold) and it was nothing but a PITA that created hard feelings. People would drag in all kinds of junky containers I couldn't use and then pout when they didn't get their 25 cent credit. After filling up my garbage can a few times we put a stop to the practice.

AAngel, recycling is a wonderful thing but I can't bring myself to re-use a glass container if it's going to a customer. Yes, jars are reused constantly in canning - the purpose for which they're manufactured - and yet they still sometimes break even though exposed to heat for a short time. Used as a candle, however, that glass is exposed to high heat units for several sustained periods of time. I use masons, too, and worry enough about having a new jar break, much less one which has already been stressed repeatedly. But then...I'm a worrier.

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Our company pours to order. Even though we do large quantities..... we have 27 scents and 8 different containers we offer.... so just to keep one of each on the shelf is 216 candles.....

We do have the luxury of this being a full time business for me AND I have employees..... and 12 turkey fryers..... so I have 360 lbs of melted wax at my disposal when I need it...

I guess it comes down to how many scents and how many containers, etc.

If you are small, melting down a bit of wax in a presto really isn't all that time consuming. I know our most popular sizes and scents so I will pour extra here and there. I just hate to see $$$ sitting on a shelf.

As for re-using containers...... we are mainly wholesale and would NEVER go there..... but I do do it for VERY close friends and family..... because it is a TOTAL PITA!! I always check the glass closely though...

Maybe think about getting some of your frgrances in the tins wicked and offer this, ONLY if they clean them out themselves!

Because it's not worth .50 to me to clean out ANYTHING....lol

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