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Straight Cosmetic Grade FO in roll on perfume


Cissy
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I read that some use a straight cosmetic grade perfume in their roll on perfume instead of using or blending FO with cyclo, FCO, etc.

This sounds like so much less trouble. What are the advantages of blending other than possibly saving money. I'm thinking of trying these in my line and prefer to go the easiest way, but also wish to make them the best way. I called a supplier who told me it would be ok to use the cosmetic grade alone, but would appreciate opinions of others here as to advantages and disadvantages.

2nd question: Do any of you use the swirl or decorative design roller bottles instead of the plain ones. I figure I will have to put a label on top of the cap since the bottle isn't smooth. If any of you use the 1/3 oz swirl design from SOS, will a 3/4" round label fit the top of cap? Any ideas on labeling these swirl/decorative bottles? All ideas are greatly appreciated.

3rd question: I know I'm asking a lot of questions here, but here goes one more.

Can anyone suggest where I can get a display that will fit these bottles. I searched several sites and saw lipstick displays, but not sure if the holes will be big enough for the roll on bottles. They only gave outside dimensions, not the actual size of the holes. Since I didn't find the actual dimensions either at SOS, I'm afraid of ordering any displays and then the bottles not fitting.

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Definately not. No FO or EO should be used straight. You can make a perfume that's about 25-33% fragrance, diluted with jojoba/cyclo/FCO/whatever, but that's as high as I'd comforably go.

If a supplier is telling you that you can use it straight, either

1. It's a fragrance that's already been diluted to a safe amount, in oil or alcohol

2. They didn't understand what you were asking

3. They don't understand much about their products :)

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Actually, I read on this board from a long time member's post, that they had been using the straight cosmetic grade FO in roller ons. (prefer to not mention any names, as it seemed everyone else didn't do this). I then called SOS today, talked to the person who answered phone, told him I wanted to use FO in roller perfume bottle. He understood exactly the application I intended and told me it would be ok to use the cosmetic grade (only) for this purpose, without adding anything to the FO. He could not have possibly misunderstood me, as I explained to him in detail. I still wanted other opinions here, though, because I don't want to take any chances on skin irritations. Thanks for your advice. I will decide what I will be blending with the FO after more research..

Can someone help me with the other questions in my post? Thanks.

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You could be in for a nasty surprise if you use uncut FO's in a roll-on bottle. Not only could it cause skin irritation or burns, but it might also compromise the integrity of your bottle components if you use a plastic roller ball (which basically everyone sells).

I found this place that sells displays, but I have no idea whether the dimensions will be suitable for your bottle size. I would contact them for verification.

http://www.blueearthdesign.com/bottle%20displays.html

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BIG GIANT NO-NO. Please be careful. You are going to end up with people complaining of red, burning skin, possibly even people feeling physically ill and your bottles will start to be eaten away & disintegrate & possibly ruin someones pocket book, or worse. I understand your continiuing to do research, but that one post you remember seeing of a person using 100% FO is probably the only one you'll find & I'm sure that person must've gotten alot of feedback on that. I know I've seen etailers selling perfumes & dry oil sprays, claiming to use 50% FO & I was always told that THAT was too much! I guess you can make up a bunch in all your different scents & test them on yourself for a few weeks & see what happens. Then, again in a few months & see what happens to your skin & the bottles themselves. If you have no problems, I guess, then you can go on to your testers & see what happens to them. But honestlly, I've always read that 100% FO load is a huge no-no & can cause some serious damage. I wanted to know about going up to 50% because I wanted to make nice, strong, long lasting body sprays, but after researching & testing, I stick to my standard ratios & percents. But it can't hurt to continue asking, I totally understand that.:smiley2:

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Sockmonkey, thanks for the blueearthdesign link. I really like the last one on the page. When I get ready to sell, I will probably order that one.

Taryn, as I mentioned, I am going to do further research on the carrier oils, then decide what I want to order. Believe me, I will be testing extensively, I even test my tarts to death before I sell them to the public. The last thing I ever want to hear is a complaint from any customer about anything I sell. I will be way more particular with a product they put on their skin. I asked all the other questions regarding the bottles and displays because I like to plan everything out before I jump into anything, even my packaging and displays.

It can prevent unexpected and wasted expenses on products and additional shipping, sometimes. I'm glad I asked the question about using straight FO. It certainly benefited me and might help someone else who has never made the roll ons, who might read the same post I read or get misinformation from elsewhere, and never ask other opinions and end up with a hugh problem. Advice from several sources is always so important and one of the things about this board that I really appreciate.

Thanks everyone.

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If a supplier tells you that you can use straight fragrance oil, you can be sure they either don't know what they're talking about, or they're cutting their fragrances.

IFRA regulations call for no more than 20% fragrance oil to 80% base for any leave on product. IFRA is the regulatory body that governs the fragrance manufacturers. And if you're manufacturing a cosmetic, you need to abide by those rules. Perfumes and body sprays are products fall under the cosmetic manufacturing guidelines of the FDA.

If you have any questions, you're welcome to browse the FAQ on our site, or drop me an email at tish (at) thescentworks.com.

http://store.scent-works.com/froilfaq.html#SkinSafety

HTH,

tish

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  • 6 months later...

I have tried many times using straight FO on my skin*, and every single one never smells as good that way as when I have first mixed it with a carrier. I can almost 100% of the time smell something "off" / plasticky / whatever in a straight FO that will be mititgated in a carrier. I don't know why, or if my nose is just wacky, but the result is always better mixed with something else. Also, that oily base makes it stick around longer on your skin.

*I've tried several straight FOs just because I wanted to try them, but always when some spills or slips down the side of the bottle I don't let it go to waste. It gets rubbed somewhere on me. :D

Darbla

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