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If you have fragrance oil overload in a candle? The reason I ask is....I am pouring up jar candles, using pre-blended paraffin wax and 1oz of FO per pound. I am heating up to 175 and adding FO....all seems well and then after the second pour to top it 48 hours later, it seems that there are little dark spots (water marks) or wet dots on the side of the jar in random places. The wax has separated from the jar so it clanks around , if I tilt the jar one way the dark spot disappears and when I tilt it back the spot is there and is liquid. Is that a fragrance pool ? Or .....help....how can you tell? Does it sink to the bottom if it is overload? How long does it take for the fragrance to separate.....I don't want to sell a dangerous candle.. Any help would be appreciated at this point. Maybe I am being PARANOID!!!

Thanks in advance,

Denise :grin2:

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Denise, I'm a container newbie myself but it sure doesn't sound good. Not sure what type of preblend you are using. I use J223 and have never had my wax clank around in a container. Sure sounds like FO. Do the wax specs call for a 6% FO load? What FO did you use? Some have to be stirred longer. Not sure I would even do a test burn on it.

Maybe someone with some experience will chime in.

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Wow, are you sure you used a container wax, container waxes usually stay soft and ahere to the sides of the jar, where as yours seem to have shrunk. Please let us know what wax it is that you are using, it will help us help you. Different waxes can hold differnt amounts of FO. The suppliers site usually gives the the load limits for the wax.

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* Production Pre-Blended Votive/Tart Wax - Hassle Free from Candles & Supplies

Description: This blend is designed for candle makers who like the convenience and quality of a pre-blended wax at the sharpest prices possible. It makes a nice solid, creamy color candle, and gives a nice smooth top on your candles after the repour. I've experimented and poured this wax at all different temperatures with all different scents and colors and found it so easy and vitually goof-proof. It burns clean and throws scent well and gives predictible results in any climate or temperature. It's great for beginners too since it's so easy! I highly recommend trying this wax!

Type: Paraffin blended with additives

Meltpoint: 133 degrees

Primary Use: Tarts and votives

Packaging: Flakes

Wick Suggestion: cotton core, zinc core, and Heinz coreless

Recommended Pouring Temperature: 180-190 degrees

Instructions for Use: Heat wax to 200 degrees. Add scent and color and pour at 180 degrees. This wax will give you a nice smooth finish when you top off the candle with the repour.

When I talked to Cindy at C&S she told me she has poured this wax up as low as 165 and has not had problems. The FO's are from Natures Garden....and I love them

When I look at the bottom of my jar there is no fluid down there at all, it is rock solid!!!

I told Cindy that I was making Container candles and she highly recommended this wax....she said it was Goof Proof....my God what does that say about me?

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This is a votive wax hun, its much to hard to make containers from, Container wax is much much softer and does not rattle at all. You could try calling the rep back and letting them know of thier error, or get yourself some votive molds, remelt that sucker and pour it into the molds. that way nothing is wasted.

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Denise may have pasted the wrong description...they do have a container candle blend. Hopefully that is what she meant to post.

Here is their description of their container blend:

BESTSELLER *** Production Single-Pour Container Wax

Description: This is our new favorite (and recommended) wax for container candles! It's smooth and creamy, one pour, colors nicely, burns evenly, throws scent well and is priced right. I poured it at all different temperatures and it could not make an ugly candle no matter what I did with it. It is a vegetable/paraffin blend and adheres to the jar very well with little or no wet spots. The best choice for wicks is Heinz CD, zinc core, or paper core.

Type: Paraffin

Meltpoint: 118 degrees

Primary Use: Container candles in glass jars, crocks, mugs, etc.

Packaging: 10-11 lb. slabs

Wick Suggestion: Heinz coreless, zinc core, or paper core

Recommended Pouring Temperature: 160 degrees

Instructions for Use: Heat wax to 180-190 degrees. Add scent and color and cool until 160 degrees before pouring to cause less shrinking in the wax.

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Cindy is the owner of Candles & Supplies :confused: It seems that the first ten boxes of candles that I already made (yeah!!) were fine and as soon as I started using Nature Gardens FO....wierd things started happening. I AM SO UPSET RIGHT NOW....TAKE A LOOK AT WHAT IS ON THE WEBSITE

Votive/Tart waxes are generally softer and a lower melt point than pillar waxes. Some votive waxes can be used for container candles too.

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No...unfortunately I posted the right description. I told her that I liked a solid container candle and I didn't mind the re-pour. The only reason I started using this is because their other "hassle free" container wax was discontinued.

The rattling doesn't bother me....it's not like it clanks around in the jar....you have to really shake it to get it to make a noise. It's the dark spots....

What would I do without you guys.....(thank you all so much for listening & helping)

And....to boot...the scent throw is AWESOME on this wax hot and cold. And....I had to up the wicks (using zinc core) and the candle burns completely to the perimeter. The burn on these is fantastic....still worrying about the wet spots.....

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Denise, this wax is an unconventional choice for a container candle, but there's no reason not to use it if you like it and are getting a good burn and melt pool. There are too many J-223 candles anyway. However, you have to choose to live with its tendency to create wet spots right off the bat.

What you want to do to tweak this particular candle is simply figure out how low a temp you can pour at. The lower the temp, the less shrinkage and the better it will adhere. It could be helpful if you have a heat gun. I'd say carefully heat the container until it's hot to the touch (not burning hot, but hot, and try not to melt the coating on the wick), then pour at 160 and see how that works out.

With this strategy I'd still heat the wax higher to add FO then stir till it cools down to pour temp.

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I use both of those waxes,(Hi Denise). Some waxes are ideal for crocks, not containers, and I think this may be one of those cases. I love this votive/tart wax, it is awesome for pillars (if you prefer pillars that melt all the way down, not bulging, or blow outs). You can't do mottles, etc., with it but you can get one nice creamy, pillar.

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