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measuring UV inhibitor..help!


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OK you math whizes ;) I need your help to make sure I am calculating this correctly!

Im about to make a 3 layer pillar..here are the specs:

4 x 4.5 round mold

Holds 29 oz wax

each layer will be 9.7 oz wax

Im trying to figure out how much FO and UV inhibitor I need to use for each layer. If the UV says 1 tsp per pound of wax (0.3% by wt), I come up with 2.91 oz of UV for 9.7 oz of wax. Is that right?? Needless to say, Math was never my best subject :(

TIA!

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Those were my thoughts exactly so I recalculated and came up with .0291 also. I did 9.7 x .3 and thats how i came up with 2.91..then I did 9.7 x .3% and came up with .0291..but...I decided to use 1/4 tsp for 9oz wax (instead of 9.7) since Im not sure what .0291 is in tsp's.

Im going to try to do a rustic..gonna pour the 1st layer at 140, wait till it has a skin and then pour 2nd layer at 145 and 3rd layer at 150. You guys think that will do it? 1st and 3rd layer is blue (scented BB Muffin)..still trying to decide what middle layer will be...wanting a light color, was thinking grey or ivory...can someone give me an idea of what would look good between 2 layers of blue??

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If you have at least one more container that could serve as a pour pot, it might just make the most sense to measure/melt wax and additives for the entire candle at once. That will make the UV easier to measure and whatever additives you're using will be consistent between all the layers. Then you can weigh, scent and color the layers individually.

The exact amount of UV isn't really critical if you're just making yourself a candle. Some vague approximation in a measuring spoon should be adequate.

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If your UV says 1 tsp pp which is 16 oz. then a 9 oz layer would be just over 1/2 tsp. Why not make life easy and just use a heaping 1/2 tsp. Shouldn't make that much diff. For you FO it would depend on the wax you are using and the FO load you want. If you are looking for a 6% load then 9 oz x 6% = .54 oz of FO.

Can't help on colors. Would depend on the shades of blue you are using. Maybe a light purple so it would look like water, sunset, and sky. I would look at some layers in the gallery to see what colors were used.

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.gonna pour the 1st layer at 140, wait till it has a skin and then pour 2nd layer at 145 and 3rd layer at 150. You guys think that will do it? 1st and 3rd layer is blue (scented BB Muffin)..still trying to decide what middle layer will be...wanting a light color, was thinking grey or ivory...can someone give me an idea of what would look good between 2 layers of blue??

You can pour them all at 150. Typically, I'll take one layer and just add clear wax to what tiny bit is left adhering to the pour pot from the last layer for at least one layer, making it a pastel of the layer above.

e

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I'd melt 2 lbs of wax add 1tsp of UV then use 3 pour pot or pyrex, or like eugenia said above, add more wax to the left over of the previous layer. Measure out 10 oz wax ea and then add fo and color to each. I'd use .6oz per 10 oz of wax (6% load) , if my math is right :undecided

The left over you can make a votive or tarts

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