Jump to content

Soy coloring question


Recommended Posts

I have been using block colors in my soy candles. I have tried burgundy and also cherry and I get pink :undecided . I just got some of Peaks Apple Jack and Peel and I want it red. I also got some of the (and I don't think I should say this too loud) Home for the Holidays and I would like that a dark Christmasy green. Is there any kind of coloring that won't turn out pastel in soy? TIA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The short answer is no. Even if you get it dark, soy is so opaque its still going to look chalky. If you add black, it will get darker, but then will look sort of dirty. I went through all sort of things last year trying to do the SAME thing you are now, including using tons of liquid dye. The best thing is to use a soy/paraffin blend and you'll easily get the colors you want - like this (KY Parasoy, gold tin - on a christmas-red sales flyer for comparison):

post-98-139458378723_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only experience so far has been with the EcoSoya CB-135 Pure Soy. I got (as expected) a fairly pastel shade the first time I used it.

I wanted to experiment with getting a richer color without adding a lot of solvent (liquid dye) or stearic (color block) so I got some powder dye and was able to get a strong color. Strong enough that I feel just the lightest touch of black could replicate HenryK's photo.

The problem, as has been pointed out, is that powder dyes are awfully difficult to use.

I solved the weighing problem by using an amount I could measure accurately with a gram scale, adding it to a small quantity of wax, and pouring into clamshell packaging to make my own soy color blocks. They contain nothing but pure dye plus the wax I'm using, which pleases me.

The next problem is that some of the powder dye colors are, for practical purposes, impossible to dissolve completely except maybe in some solvent other than wax. I had to solve that by straining through cheesecloth while pouring the stuff. This mixing and straining is what starts to make the whole thing a big bother.

The final problem is that this pure dye is very powdery. I now understand the advice I read to use a mask while working with it. Let's just say if aniline dye was any more toxic, I'd be dead now.

That's as far as I've gotten with this experiment so far, apart from the one pour in which I got the good color. Thought someone might find my adventures useful or amusing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To get your red, try mixing red and orange together. I mix 3 parts red to one part orange and get a nice red. Of course it will be different for everyone. Not sure about the powders, but my liquid dyes work well to get that nice red color. The yellow from the orange seems to balance out the "pink" color. Then if you want it a little darker, like a cinnamon apple red color, I add a couple of drops of black.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use dye blocks and don't have a problem I melt and color 12 pounds of pure soy wax. I put the color in the bottm. I just continue to shave the block of color and test color on a paper plate after five minutes, I check the color and add more if needed.

I've work with pure soy wax for nearly five years now. Color takes time to learn with soy wax but I love jewel tones in my candles so they are VERY dark. No pastels for me.;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen cranberry test candles done at distributor. They used French color liquid dyes (think it was #D1730) in different different waxes (soy, the j waxes, palms, etc.). There was absolutely no comparison at all. The results looked totally different when placed side by side. They 100% soys and the soy/cottonseeds may get "dark", but the are never going to look the same as the paraffins because of the refraction. Thats all I meant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes you certainly can...just need the right dyes. Powders are killer strong and only a dab will do you to get true, dark colors. Extremely hard to control, however and they cannot be weighed with any kind of affordable scale.

There are also some liquids out there that will do it.

I just got some soy wax & am now reading up on the best way to use it. Reading your post makes me want to ask ... have you seen those itty bitty measuring spoons? Next time I see them I think I'll have to buy them. Let's see, there's a 'pinch', a 'smidge', 'dash' and I think one other size. Has anyone used those for the powder dyes?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen cranberry test candles done at distributor. They used French color liquid dyes (think it was #D1730) in different different waxes (soy, the j waxes, palms, etc.). There was absolutely no comparison at all. The results looked totally different when placed side by side. They 100% soys and the soy/cottonseeds may get "dark", but the are never going to look the same as the paraffins because of the refraction. Thats all I meant.

I understand what you are saying Henry and I agree. I get great colors with my soy, and great dark colors. But I think the paraffins get a better true color. Not sure that is the word I am looking for, but you get the idea.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got some soy wax & am now reading up on the best way to use it. Reading your post makes me want to ask ... have you seen those itty bitty measuring spoons? Next time I see them I think I'll have to buy them. Let's see, there's a 'pinch', a 'smidge', 'dash' and I think one other size. Has anyone used those for the powder dyes?
LOL, I have those spoons. Wasn't using them to measure dye but I occasionally find a use for them. For consistent coloring I guess you can define smidgeons per pound or something. But see my post about all the other difficulties. A surgical type mask is highly recommended because you otherwise WILL inhale dye, and the problem of dissolving the dyes WILL make you nuts.

Plus you have a decision to make with the powders. You can spend a lot of money to accumulate the handy-dandy available colors, or you can spend a modest amount for the basic colors and mix your own. The latter may get you into measuring complications again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...