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How do your container candles burn


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Ok, its a simple question, but ive never had a container candle that came from anywhere other then the dollar store. I have a 16oz container double wicked. It is on its 5th burn. 1st burn, full melt pool after 4 hours, 1/2 an inch in depth, wonderful scent throw. on following burns, the melt pool took much less time to obtain, and the flames stayed at about the same height as when I lit it. Now on the 5th burn, I am still getting full melt pool all the way across, but it seems after I get a full melt pool, the flames almost seem it "simmer". They are not close to drowning, about 1/2 an inch high, but they are just not as strong as when it was lit 2 hours ago. Is this a normal burn for a container, or is this an indication that things are starting to go downhill with the burn?

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I just starting testing 10 oz apothecary jars and I haven't had any 2 permorm the same yet...so, I'm bumping and watching for any answers.

I've had the flames flicker a bit more further down in the jar, but that was the best burn I got so I'm hoping that's a normal thing. Actually just lit another tester about 1/2 hour ago.

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I have burned many container candles(duh:rolleyes: ..havent we all?) I have burned dollar store candles, expensive candles and candles that I have repoured myself. It seems that they all need some attention somewhere along the way.

Whether it's pouring a little wax off---in the situation you mentioned or manually pushing some hangup from the sides down into the melt pool if the flame is too high and there is still lots of hangup. I like my flame to be 1/2' to 1'--no more, no less.

So the only thing I can say that seems "normal" is that I am going to be messing with it somewhere along the way. Hey, I dont mind; its just part of the fun.

And I want to come to your dollar store and get some 16 OZ candles for a buck.:yay:

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hehe, trust me, any container candle from the dollar store, just not worth it. Im going to let this one keep burning, and im going to make another one with the next size up and see which burn I like better. This is the closest ive gotten so far to a working container out of several wick combos ive tried over the last few months, and im trying hard not to get frustrated. Votives and tea lights were so easy to wick, wish it was the same for these guys.

What I am gathering is even if I have to play with the candle a whee bit to have it perform to its peak, customers will not think of this as odd, because they have to do it with any other candle theyve ever had anyways. Is this correct?? :P

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I think it's typical. Large apothecary's are a good example. Your first many burns will take longer to reach a full melt pool. The flame is strong, the rim of the jar may get a bit warm due to proximity of the flame, but by the time you're half way (or more) down inside that jar it burns totally different.

You'll reach a full melt pool MUCH quicker than you did when you first started. I think that's due to a bit of "memory" maybe, but more so that so much of the heat is captured with in the jar. That in turn will also cause a smaller flame due to the lower amount of availbale oxygen, you might even have more flickering due to the increased draft from the heat, which unfortunately can cause more smoking (and yes, even in 100% soy).

The tricky part is wicking them so that the flame is still viable when you're down deep in the jar, yet not scorchingly hot when the jar is new. That's why so many peeps have troubles wicking apoths. And why it's so important that (especially) tall jars be burned completely down during testing.

You'll also have more of this effect with jars (like apoths) where the neck narrows compared to the body, but any container that is deep will do it. IMO there's kind of a line you cross, somewhere about the point where the depth into the jar equals the diameter, from that point on you'll see big differences from the beginning.

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I agree with Beth.

Wicking is not so precise a science as we like to sometimes think it is. LOL There are just SO many factors. I don't believe there's any such thing as perfection, so just shoot for the best possible wicking job you can do. As soon as you get it squared away for one wax/dye/wick/fo combo, it will probably change on the next one anyway. LOL ;)

Besides, you can get your wicking down to an art, but you can't take into account how everyone else will burn. Some blow it out after 20 min., some burn all day, some burn in a draft, some don't trim wicks, some burn in a cold room, etc. Work hard at it, but don't stress out unnecessarily trying to make every single thing absolutely 100% perfect. I'd love it if my wicks consistently consumed themselves at about the same rate they consumed the wax, but hey -- it just isn't going to happen every single time. :) Sometimes they've gotta be trimmed.

Strive for perfection, but don't be disappointed if you don't achieve every detail every time, KWIM? :wink2: Set realistic goals. Although once I'll admit I had to completely give up on one fo I couldn't get wicked in an apothecary because it wasn't even coming close to burning correctly no matter what I did. Tried my darndest, but it was a heavy spiced fo. Chanted at the moon, stood on my head spitting bb's, and the whole 9 yards. Finally told the customers they'd have to go with wickless or tarts on that one. heh heh

Edited to clarify and add MORE sentences, as if my post weren't long enough to begin with. bwa-hahaha!

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You know what I've noticed with many store bought candles? They are often double or triple wicked in a container that I would have ordinarily wicked with maybe an HTP 104 or even a 105.There was one I bought recently from Walmart, it was scented "Orange Jasmine" and it's in a straight up and down container...wonderful scent. 3 and 1/4 inch diameter and it's double wicked! I'm going to burn it and see how it does once it gets past the midpoint. Maybe just maybe they have something there?

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Are we talking Soy or Paraffin??? Since I am in General candle making I will assume(?) Paraffin:

I have used the wide mouth Kerr canning jars since I started,,,people love them here,,,for my 16oz I use 4786 and I wick (depending if the FO is heavy) I use 60z,,,If FO light 51z. I like my burn 1/2 to 1 inch also. I have also tried HTP 83 successfully with this jar. When I am to my fifth burn my melt pool is doing well. I dont mind if it "simmers" as long as it is throwing and it has a good MP and there is no soot building up.

If Soy,,, GB464 I use depending on the FO and heaviness in the same Jar ,,,Heavy a HTP 1312, light (maybe a HTP1212) or the 700 primeier series sizes 780 to 798. Im still playing with Soy,,,;) So I do not sell these yet,,,be a while,,,

I agree with Crafty1_AJ you can only strive to perfection and get as close as you can,,,I am happy with my candles thus far with the 4786.

I also have a wee bit of Peaks One Pour Performance Blend I love too,,,I loved that wax.

Okay rambling now,,,Gotta make some candles,,,Have a great day!!

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I make 16 oz. wide mouth jars with (1) 51z and have no problems...other than the obvious mushrooms. Burns down to the metal tab with absolutely no wax left on the glass.

I'm in the process now of re-testing wicks htp, lx, rrd mostly to get away from trimming and mushrooming. I have never double wicked when it's only 3" across. I do use a soy/paraffin blend (JS 50/50); and I pour some heavy scents with absolutely no problems. Even when I used straight paraffin I never double wicked.

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hehe, trust me, any container candle from the dollar store, just not worth it. Im going to let this one keep burning, and im going to make another one with the next size up and see which burn I like better. This is the closest ive gotten so far to a working container out of several wick combos ive tried over the last few months, and im trying hard not to get frustrated. Votives and tea lights were so easy to wick, wish it was the same for these guys.

What I am gathering is even if I have to play with the candle a whee bit to have it perform to its peak, customers will not think of this as odd, because they have to do it with any other candle theyve ever had anyways. Is this correct?? :P

Put your jar candle from the Dollar Store on a candle jar warmer and melt it instead of lighting it. That is what I do with the ones that don't burn right.

Just a thought

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Im not trying to melt a dollar store candle. Im trying to create a high quality container candle, and i've never seen one burn before, so i wanted to know how it should perform :) Trust me, I will never touch another dollar store candle as long as I live. Im working with paraffin, 4786, 16 oz apoth, 4 inches across. I have it double wicked right now with 44-24-18C's and am going to try 44-28-18C to see which burn I like better, the 44-24s are working, I am about half way through the jar, I would just like my flames to be just a little stronger. Ive tried single wicking with as high as an HTP121 and was not happy with the smoking torch that did not give me a full melt pool :) Besides I love the look of double wicks, and I have an ez wick setter, so it's not any extra work for me.

Thank you for all your help guys, keep the advice coming if anyone has anymore, this is definatly helping me.

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...Im trying to create a high quality container candle, and i've never seen one burn before, so i wanted to know how it should perform...
In addition to the basic wicking/burning guidelines, it may help if you just went and bought a non-dollar store candle. Since you're using paraffin, that should be pretty easy... there are many accessible lines of major brands. Not just a generic 'super-center' variety either. Well, I guess it could help to be informed on how those burn too.

I'm not suggesting to imitate the way they burn, but it'll give you an idea of how they burn. As well as keeping informed of what strong/weak points that future customers may be comparing your candle to.

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