Jump to content

CC dye crystals...any reviews?


Recommended Posts

I use mostly the diamonds and here and there the liquids. However my choice for black is CC's cyrstals. They give you a VERY black black - not that dark purple (like anything in soy you have to use more than for paraffin). Also, add them when you wax is hottest (prior to FO).

I haven't used the rest of them but I think top has. Perhaps he can chime in.

Your correct - not having solvents in dyes when you are using soy is a definate plus IMO.

HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Top.

Are you finding that you can add red and get red, not pink or purple and not get lavender?

I really like the natural waxes but I can't seem to get past the pastel stage without adding a lot of color block.

I would like to be able to make my soy candle whatever color suits the fragrance and sometimes, pastel doesn't cut it. For example, I would want a cinnamon candle to be red and a pine to be deep green.

So, do you think I should try them out?

Thanks!

Angie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Angie,

The liquids are much stronger than the diamonds or blocks. If you want a dark color you may want to try what I do. Do MOST Of the color in diamonds or flakes (crystals) or what have you, then just add a few drops of liquid(s) in the same or around the same hue. You have to test until you get your recipie you may want to keep, but its worth it IMO because you don't have to use ALL liquid and possibly mess with the setting up of the soy (sometimes the type of dye solvent can interfer with the soy - just depends on how much you use and the wax type). PLUS you aren't using up all your diamonds/crystals. (Liquids are cheaper to use). Example, for mulled cider I just mixed burgandy dye diamonds and burgandy liquid from Candle Science. The actual candle is even darker than the hue here since I used a flash on the camera. If I don't need a dark color I just use the diamonds.

HTH

post-98-139458393202_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That wax is ecosoya CBA version 1, which is the only version they make now. There is no paraffin in it. See:

http://www.ngiwax.com/ProductInformation/CB-AdvancedSoy.php

(Just to be clear, I use the diamonds and THEN added liquid(s) if needed to get a darker color. Usually for pastel or medium shades I'll just use the diamonds, no liquid at all).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Feel free to PM me if you want to try the crystals. I have a set of every color to sell cheap. HOWEVER, all I would say is they are a good sediment-free alternative to color blocks. They won't do something that color blocks or the like won't do.

I don't claim to be a dye expert, but here is my take from what I know so far:

As far as the DYE portion of the colorant goes, they are all pretty much the same stuff. Getting a certain hue and shade is a matter of putting in the right color dyes in the right amounts for the type of wax you're using. There's no colorant that contains a special dye substance that can color soy darker than another colorant. If you seem to reach a limit where it doesn't matter how much you put in, it's probably an additional color you're missing. For instance, the red = pink issue happens with paraffin container waxes too and people add orange. Sometime to get darker you need to add a bit of black or another color.

So the issue we run into is not the type of dye, but the dispersal agent it's mixed into. Sometimes to get a particular color, we find that we have to add too much solvent, too much stearic, or whatever the dye is dissolved in. There are various solutions if you need a lot of dye:

1 - "Split the difference" is HenryK's unique and smart approach. Use different types of colorants so you don't have to put in too much of any one thing.

2 - Use a colorant with a "benign" dispersal agent, which would be the Pryme dye solution. With that one you can put in a lot of dye and (supposedly) only have to worry of the oil holding capacity of your wax.

3 - Buy a respirator, a very expensive scale, some filter material, and use powder dyes so you don't have to worry about a dispersal agent at all. It's just pure dye.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to be clear, there really are dye flakes and dye crystals. Some places have flakes that are called flakes but look like crystals. When I got Snow White "flakes" from BCN, they actually look like crystals, but some other ones I got from there were flake form. KY candle supply calls theirs flakes - and thats what they actually are, just like 1 Stop Candle. Candle Cocoon calls them crystals, but the ones I got were in flake form (Worked really well though).

However, there actually is solid dye which is all in crystal form. One of the only places I know to get them are at http://makesscentscandles.com/shopping/colorants.html#crystals. These are NOT just busted up dye flakes, they are different (looks like coarse sand). This dye is easy to measure and melts decently, but you DO have to make sure to add when the wax is hot and stir well (like any solid dye) as you may get some sediment in some colors. (I use all liquid dye in pillars just to be on the safe side since the bottom of the mold where sediment will deposit if not fully mixed is the top of the candle).

Didn't post this to be confusing, just want to say that there really are dye crystals out there that are not in flake form.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks! I think you both answered my question. I was trying to find a way to get vivid color without causing other problems (frosting or odor). It looks like I was given many ideas to try.

Never thought about adding black (but then again, I don't have any black color block). The CC black will definitely be on my wish list.:drool:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to make dye fish. Do you think it would sell? Kind of like the goldfish crackers, but dye. You could watch the little buggers swim around while you stir, until they dissolve. It would be fun.

That would definitely be a "guy thing." Maybe I can get DH helping if I had them....HMMMM, quite a fine idea!

:cheesy2:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some people grind up the flakes in order to measure them in small amounts, You don't have to do this with the crystals - thats the advantage IMO.

Adding black to get a darker color in soy works to a point - a drop or two, but more than that, it will start to look "dirty". You will be able to tell a dark red from a red that you just added a lot of black to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...