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Single-note, non-blended fragrance oils + best supplier or manufacturer?


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Hello everyone. I'm new to candle making and want to use only the most premium fragrance oils. First of all, does anyone have recommendations for a *premium quality* fragrance oil supplier? I can see from comments that there are some low quality suppliers. Second, do any of the top quality suppliers sell single-note, non-blended fragrance oils? For example, musk or gardenia or rose that is only musk or gardenia or rose and not a blend of several fragrance oils. I would like to blend my own unique scents using single notes and am seeking the purest version of each scent. Looking for answers from longtime candle and soap makers. Thank you kindly.

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  • Scentsory changed the title to Single-note, non-blended fragrance oils + best supplier or manufacturer?

You have to get samples. There are a million types of musks, roses etc. Each manufacturer has their own blend of single note scents. Get samples and see how you’re the representation of the note, then blend. Each fragrance will perform differently in products as each manufacturer formulates differently to get scent. It’s not as simple as buy here.

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For this specific type of goal, you’ll need to seek an account with a fragrance compounding lab, like lebermuth, Agilex, Symrise, etc. that have perfumers on staff to help isolate the aromachemicals that will work for your candles. Typically the minimum buy of compounds and finished fragrances will be in the 25 lb neighborhood. 

 

at the same time, join a perfumery guild to find aromachemical blending classes available. The perfumers apprentice is an online source of the base aromachemicals, some carriers and is a decent starting place.
 

“Single note” aromas are usually comprised of an accord of many aromachemicals. Each aromachemical combo has its own set of  strengths, limitations and weaknesses in an application (candles, perfumery, soap, etc.). Aromachemicals will need to be suspended in a diluent for chandlery, which you’ll need to choose to best work with your candle variables. 
 

creating excellent fragrances for candles is pretty complex.  It will take some time and resources but you can do it. 
 

the final piece is your actual candle. You can develop a perfect fragrance that just works - or doesn’t work - with your wax, wick, container, etc. it’s a process that can be frustrating and rewarding at the same time. Many of us that have taken your journey have accumulated quite a load of compounds that sit in the candle graveyard, lol. It is all an investment in our education. 

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Thank you NightLight, KandleKrazy, and TallTayl for your great responses. I truly appreciate your help as I am just starting out - and learning fast! Undoubtedly there will be much trial and error, but I am determined to create premium quality candles with custom-blended scents. I will check out the suggestions and any further recommendations on high-quality scent suppliers or manufacturers would be greatly valued.

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Thank you, TallTayl. Yesterday I ordered some scents from a supplier that may not offering be the best quality, according to members of this forum. Will order from Crafter's Choice and compare them with the scents that will be arriving. I'm definitely seeking the highest quality and don't want to waste money on subpar oils.

 

Question if you have time for it - can you blend essential and fragrance oils together in one candle scent? I would think not but just checking.

 

 

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Thanks, NightLight. I'm not sure how to test the blend except to just make a sample candle and light it. Re: wax and wick combo - I'm learning that this depends on type of wax used and wick (thickness per container size, to avoid tunneling, yes?). And that the wick will determine how the flame will burn the candle, which will affect the scent throw, right? No need to reply if you're busy. I'll figure it out!

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Welcome to candle makers world!

 

Finding the right wax, wick, & container shape combo is the hardest part of candle developing.  If you have not done that, then I recommend you to do that before you look for fragrance compounders/houses/manufacturers.  It would take a lot of trial and error to find right wax, wick & container combo.  You can work with any local supplier's FOs(if there is any) while you are working on that.

 

*Hint: 

No successful candle makers would be using stock waxes.  No stock wax will work great, and they will need to be modified in some ways. 

Wick manufacturers have better wicks that candle suppliers don't carry, and they only sell to candle manufacturers(small or large).  I am just saying that better wicks are available at manufacturers.

As long as FOs are manufactured in US, they would be similar in quality if it was ordered right unless someone ordered them to use the cheapest possible materials to save cost.  It's just matter of who created better accord to present certain scent.  One FO manufacturer would make 20 different types of Rose FOs.  Which would be the best rose FO among them?  You tell me! 

*There is no best high end FO manufacturer.  Whatever works for me would be the best company.

 

Enjoy your candle journey & good luck!

 

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Hi BusyBee,

 

Thanks for your reply and this information. Noted on fragrances. I hope the ones I ordered are decent. Well now I am wondering who to buy wax and wicks from since I was going to go with the 464 wax I see on Bramble Berry and Aztec. Wicks - I have no idea which is best. Waxed cotton or cotton and paper? Wood? Who makes good products and how do I get in touch with them? I'm sure that everyone's sources are secret, I understand!

 

I'll experiment for now using the pre-made scents and stock waxes and wicks.

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Before you go crazy with fragrances. Pick a wax. Buy sample packs of wicks. Learn how waxes and wicks work together. When you have figured out how to make a safe burning candles then proceed with working with fragrances - each fragrance needs to be tested in wax. Some fragrances need a wick size up or two, and others down. 
There are tons of waxes all have different qualities. I suggest starting at Candlescience and look at their wick guide.

Look at entire wick guide and you will see that each type of wax different wicks are suggested. Each formulation of wax burn differently. Other companies have guides too that you can cross check. It’s very important first to learn how to test burn candles - you must burn candles from top to bottom when learning to make candles. How it burns at the top of the candle is different when it burns midway and bottom. 
Regarding fragrances. Some fragrances will be stellar in one wax, and then a dud in another. 
This is all very much fine tuning combinations of wax, wick, fragrance and even container!

Also starting off pick ONE container and learn how to wick it. Many beginners will decide to try making candles in five different containers and then get all mixed up with how to wick each.

 

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A good way to learn is to buy several candles and see how they burn. For example even big manufacturers have terrible candles.  I purchase from “handmade” companies, and these candles are all over the place as well. You do get a feel of how candles throw, appearance, wax texture preburn and after burn, naked wax, blends.

You have to decide the criteria of what defines a good candle for you. So obviously a safe burning candles, good scent throw. Does complete adhesion to container concern you if using glass. Appearance smooth top pre burn, smooth top after burn? Vegan candle no beeswax, parasoy, paraffin, coconut. Colored or non. 
 

I personally like a well burning candle top to bottom, adhesion to glass, smooth top pre and after burn. No beeswax.

Good cold and hot throw. Not too much to ask for 😂

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Thanks again, NightLight. All great information and I'm saving these notes. I do have many candles from different companies and find that the more luxurious companies have better, stronger scents. When it comes down to it, the reason why someone would purchase a scented candle is all about the quality of the scent. I don't know how to achieve that more concentrated scent except to add more fragrance oil? And of course have a good wax and wick combo.

 

I just received an order of about 40 scents and I'm not thrilled with the quality. Most of them have a weak and chemical smell. Maybe this will change when it's in the wax. I just want the highest quality fragrances but all comments in this thread are duly noted. I think I will need to mix in essential oils as for example the lavender I got does not smell like lavender but rather some other kind of very chemical-y flower.

 

I've ordered more FOs from another supplier so I will compare the two brands. I think there's a reason the ones I just got were on the less expensive side - you get what you pay for.

 

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Lavenders - hahah there are some atrocious smelling blends. Don’t fall for the oils have to be expensive to be good.

You have to test fragrances in wax. I have some great in one wax and terrible in another. Also out of bottle sniffle is not always very accurate how fragrances are in wax. Go slow, take notes, and don’t go crazy buying fragrances until you can pour and burn a good candle. Trust me it takes awhile but worth the time observing and testing with different wick, wax etc. then you will have a good grip on what’s going on with your candle for troubleshooting.

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Lavender is hard,  too many have no lavender like qualities at all. Harder still is which lavender you are aiming for. Herbal? floral? etc. Bulgarian? French? All smell entirely different. 
 

test them out in wax, sure, but if the scent is  perfumey or just “off” cut bait and move on versus trying to cover up a bad aroma with perfectly good essential oil. 
 

adding more fragrance to increase overall potency in the finished product creates other problems with the candle. Each fragrance is a blend of aromachemicals in a diluent (carrier). Sometimes the aromachemicals themselves mess with the wax.  Sometimes the diluents mess with the wax.  Often more fragrance oil just makes a poor burn.

 

as you continue your journey, keep trying new retailers to find those you most enjoy working with. All retailers will have duds. Finding the pearl in the oyster will be rewarding. 

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Posted (edited)

Thank you, NightLight and TallTayl. Yes I'll definitely get some better lavender - I even wanted to have my own lavender farm! So I might source it from a farm upstate. I'm not sure which lavender but I'll try several kinds.

 

Ok, I won't add extra fragrance to the wax :). I just want to make something that smells like the high-end candles and I was thinking it was the quality of the FO that's not working, but it could be the wax. I'll keep playing around with all until I achieve a good candle but FYI, I don't plan to pour each candle myself - I'm worried about not making these correctly and would prefer a professional - candle manufacturer - to make them after I figure out the scent profiles and wax. 

 

However, having a lot of trouble finding someone to do a small MOQ since I would just be starting out. Candle makers are asking for 300 - 500 per scent. With 5 -10 scents in my collection, that's running $30K + and I don't even know if I can sell a single candle, so...sigh. Getting a bit discouraged. But will keep at it. If you know of anyone able to do small runs please let me know.

 

Thanks again for all of your help. I'm happy to give marketing/advertising advice as this is my area of knowledge. Feel free to DM me.

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Sometimes it's as simple as the wrong wick, get it right and voila hot throw is good.  Like everyone said it's a testing, testing and more testing process.  IMO I wouldn't add EO to FO it's just a waste of expensive EO.  You can do all EO and get great results with some wax but I have found that soy wax morphs in a short time with EO and it looks too ugly to sell.  Good luck with the testing!

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Thanks, KandleKrazy. So interesting that wax and/or wick can affect the scent. I never would have guessed. The high-end candle brands must have tested extensively to get their hot throw just right.

 

The candles I've made so far are pretty decent overall - but for some reason, weak hot throw. I'll have to work on it!

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