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Attempting to discover the beautiful look of soy and the durability of paraffin at the same time.


AliCat
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Sheesh! Did we all initially underestimate the complexity of candle-making or what? Haha!

 

Okay, here goes...I only make pillar candles. IGI 4625 has been my go-to wax for a long time now. HOWEVER, the 4625 is absolutely terrible when it comes to making candles in silicone molds! No matter what I do, my candles always, always, always come out with thousands of tiny little bubbles when I use 4625 in a silicone mold. I've tried pouring at a hotter temp (190F), I've tried pre-heating my molds, I've tried sticking my molds into a warm oven after pouring the wax so the candles can cure slower...you name it. Yikes. Out of complete curiosity I tried using a soft container wax, IGI 6006, and the candles came out perfectly! No bubbles whatsoever! Made absolutely stunning candles - that melted way too quickly and created a huge puddle (as expected). Now I'm under the impression that softer waxes create prettier detailed candles with fewer bubbles. Anyone have experience with this?

 

I just ordered a 10-pound slab of IGI 6028 Paraffin/Soy Pillar wax. I'm praying that this will solve my bubble issue. 

 

For anyone else having this issue: I'll keep ya'll updated on the outcome of the candles once the wax comes!

*bubblebath*

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No kidding, right? Anyone can make a candle. The tricky part is making a good, safe candle.

 

the air bubbles are likely from a surface tension issue. When casting in silicone molds with other mediums (such as plaster) I use a mold prep to reduce surface tension and eliminate bubbles. For plaster I use a mold prep chemically formulated for silicone, but windex will work in a pinch. I’m not suggesting using windex for candles, just looking at other art areas for cause and effect 😊

 

for beeswax in silicone, I find that a candle release agent, like the silicone mold spray really helps. The molten, sticky wax needs something to slide over as it fills the mold. 
 

also, while pouring it is really easy to accidentally mix and trap air into the mold, especially with designs. Balancing the way you pour, combined with tipping as the wax is poured,  and tapping the mold to remove left over trapped air can help. 
 

unprimed wicks will also release air into the hot wax.  Priming the wick before pouring can help reduce the amount of air introduced in the candle as it cools.

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When I use silicone molds for soap making, I spray the mold with cyclomethicone. It seems to help the releasability especially with a mold that has had good use. A lot of this in candles, soap, bath and body is technique and practice.

fine tuning waxes helps. I have not dealt with a wax yet that did t need some fiddling.

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