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cure time for c-3 wick testing?


christianjay
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Hi friends, newbie here!

I'm testing wicks for proper sizing for a medium sized, straight-sided jar that's about 2.8" in diameter. I am using c-3 w/ a small amount of Crisco/coconut oil (because it was recommended to me).

Since I am just testing for wick size for this jar, I just poured the wax, let it set overnight then tried cd 12 the next morning. The wick tunneled. The next recommendation from CandleScience was to jump all the way to CD22--this flame seemed too large for the size of jar I was using, but I tried it. 

My questions are:
1. Can I just test the wax w/o the FO to determine the proper size wick--or do I need to test wax combined w/fo to determine proper wick size for jar?
2. Do I need to let the wax cure if I am testing wick size? If yes, what is appropriate amount of time?
3. Could it be that cd 12 is really the right wick for the jar, but because I didn't let the wax cure, it just looks too small?
4. Can someone help me understand the recommended jump from CD 12- CD 22? Am I wrong to assume that the wick sizes get larger incrementally from CD12, 14, 16, 18, 20, to CD 22? If yes, wouldn't the next wick to try (if CD 12 if too small), be the CD 14?

Thanks in advance. I appreciate any advice I can get.
 

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I'm going to take a guess at a wick size to try for your jar, others may have another opinion, but it's a CD18 -- however, this is for straight C-3 -- so, with your additive, it may be a CD16.  With your softening additive, what % of fragrance oil are you using?  I think the recommendation of a CD22 is too big, plus, your wax has your additive, so that's going to change things considerably in terms of going by a wick guide.  I happen to like C3 just as it is without any additives, but everyone has their own preference.  Depending on the type of container, that diameter seems to do well in the range of 16 or 18, for me anyway.  You will need to allow the wax to cure for at least about a week before testing, some will say more than that, but I think that's close to the minimum amount of time.

 

 

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C3 hardens/cures a lot over the weeks post-pour.  It changes burn and melt behavior dramatically.  I never got an accurate wick test with any soy before a min of a week.
 

 After a couple of months on the shelf all soy granulates and burns a bit different. 

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15 hours ago, birdcharm said:

I'm going to take a guess at a wick size to try for your jar, others may have another opinion, but it's a CD18 -- however, this is for straight C-3 -- so, with your additive, it may be a CD16.  With your softening additive, what % of fragrance oil are you using?  I think the recommendation of a CD22 is too big, plus, your wax has your additive, so that's going to change things considerably in terms of going by a wick guide.  I happen to like C3 just as it is without any additives, but everyone has their own preference.  Depending on the type of container, that diameter seems to do well in the range of 16 or 18, for me anyway.  You will need to allow the wax to cure for at least about a week before testing, some will say more than that, but I think that's close to the minimum amount of time.

 

 

@birdcharmI hadn't thought of the fact that the additive may be a contributing factor to the wick variance. Excellent point. I have been using 8% on stronger FOs and 10% on the softer ones. Also, I only added the coconut oil and crisco because it was advised to me when I was switching over from frustrating attempts to use GB 444 and 464. I will try it naked. THANK YOU for your help. Super helpful.

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14 hours ago, TallTayl said:

C3 hardens/cures a lot over the weeks post-pour.  It changes burn and melt behavior dramatically.  I never got an accurate wick test with any soy before a min of a week.
 

 After a couple of months on the shelf all soy granulates and burns a bit different. 

@TallTaylTHANK YOU! Very helpful to know this. I've read a lot of your advice through these boards about c-3, so very appreciative for you sharing your knowledge. I'll wait a couple weeks and test then. 

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5 hours ago, christianjay said:

@TallTaylTHANK YOU! Very helpful to know this. I've read a lot of your advice through these boards about c-3, so very appreciative for you sharing your knowledge. I'll wait a couple weeks and test then. 

The very first thing to do with ANY wax is a baseline. What you're doing sounds like you are very close to that baseline.

 

Baseline Process:
1) Choose one container and pour the wax with no adds at all. No vybar. No color. No scent. Nothing. Use this same size/shape/style of container for all future tests so you can compare apples to apples. Pour the candle wax using the manufacturer's directions.

 

2) allow to cure for a week at least. Check for hidden cavities under the surface. Check for other imperfections like cracks, divots, etc. Set the candle in different areas to test for heat issues like sweating, or cold areas for shrinking. This simulates different storage and shipping conditions.

 

3) Test burn to see what you have. Take very detailed notes as this will help troubleshoot any problems and narrow down the ideal process with this wax and container going forward so you can confidently make candles.

 

Why do this?

A baseline test lets you learn the wax with limited variables. You will instantly see if you have issues with future batches of that wax before you make candles and release them out into the wild where problems reveal themselves to customers. Those are expensive lessons!  Since 2016 candle waxes have varies so much from lot to lot that it is like starting over every shipment.  Knowing your wax, and understanding how to fix the shortcomings will save you loads of $$ and TIME.

 

You will also instantly see when the wax formula is reformulated. the C# I used a decade ago is not the same C3 on the market ow. I used CDN 10 - CDN12 for a 3" wide container, 6% fragrance when I started and it was the easiest, most beautiful candle ever. Now since consumer demand calls for wax that safely holds 12% and up (yikes) the wax has more additives and is difficult to burn at all. This is the same story for C1, 464, 444, etc. The wax has had to compensate for diluted fragrances that meet customer cost per lb demands.

 

Notes:

I usually do not stick a wick in a baseline for a new candle, instead choosing to poke a hole when the candle is set so  I can swap wicks as needed until I figure out the ideal wick. If the container is shallow, the wick will need a tab, though, so I generally start with a CD wick since I have thousands of them and know them really well. A Wickectomy will let me safely and quickly swap the tabbed wick if I chose the wrong one.

 

Once you know your wax, make a scented version and compare the burn. Often you will need to wick up or down depending on the scent. Every combination of aromachemicals (technical term for fragrance whether essential oils, fragrance or a combo of both) will burn differently.  Some combos make the wax melt very quickly.  Others clog wicks and will need a different series altogether. the only way to know how your fragrance will burn is to test it.  It does NOT matter if the fragrance is from the same retailer, they will still have the tendency to burn differently because of the chemicals needed to make that scent. 

 

I generally test all new lots of wax using the exact same bottle of fragrance at the same load %. Fragrances have been reformulated without notice for years. A favorite old standby might not be what it once was. I use something I don't mind smelling, and always have a LOT of the same lot number.

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