Jump to content

Multi-piece candles


Recommended Posts

Hello from Russia with love!

 

I'm new at this. And my dream is to make a candle like in the photo below. But I don’t understand how to match these blocks. And how to stretch the wick.

Please help someone to solve this problem!

 

image.thumb.png.d5c08c471354cf6d160dfa1039268d82.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, TallTayl said:

Is it just from a silicone mold? 

yes, this is a ready-made silicone mold.
photo as an example.
my idea is to create a candle from several separate spheres.
and I don’t know how to attach these balls to each other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Tatyana said:

yes, this is a ready-made silicone mold.
photo as an example.
my idea is to create a candle from several separate spheres.
and I don’t know how to attach these balls to each other.

It would take some hot wax as “glue”. Beeswax for the individual pieces and the glue would be your best bet, though timing will be an issue.  Too cold and the bond will not adhere. Too warm and they pick up lots of fingerprint parks and dents.
When separate pieces are brought together in a stack, wax bonds will be brittle. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 14.09.2021 at 14:53, TallTayl said:

В качестве «клея» потребуется немного горячего воска. Пчелиный воск для отдельных частей и клей будет вашим лучшим выбором, хотя время будет проблемой. Если слишком холодно, склейка не прилипнет. Слишком тепло, и они собирают много отпечатков пальцев и вмятин.
Когда отдельные детали складываются в стопку, восковые связи становятся хрупкими. 

Thank you for your answer!

 

In Russia beeswax costs almost the same as paraffin! Very cheap.

 

After testing I came to the conclusion that beeswax is ideal for mold candles. I realized this, including after reading almost all of your messages on the topic 😍.

 

Let me clarify a few points.
- beeswax does not hold FO well.
- in comparison with paraffin, it is impossible to obtain a rich color using dyes.
- as you wrote, I heat the beeswax to 180 and pour it in at 150. Is it normal that I have to wait 10-15 minutes for the wax to cool?

 

P.S.: sorry for my bad English.

  • Thumbs Up 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only dispute I have is about beeswax holding scent.  It can, and does, hold scent very well.  My summer shop specialized in scented beeswax candles. It can hold as much as you want.  Beeswax is used to make salve type products, with as little as 3% beeswax to any oil holding it into a stable suspension. I typically use 6-10% fragrance or essential oil in beeswax pillars and scented tapers. The scent holds for years.
 

Much comes down to the beeswax you start with, and the fragrance quality. Quality of both varies widely. I have used some beeswax that is so dark from to be practically unusable. And othe light from capping that was a dream. 
 

as for color, I use fully refined white beeswax and obtain brilliant jewel colors with liquid dye and UV inhibitor. 
AD02F96A-C90B-47A2-99A9-10574DC6C914.jpeg
 

if you can’t get a decent white, then earth tones with a base of yellow, such as green hues, are lovely. 
 

fully refined white beeswax can be accomplished from many different manufacturing methods.  Some I have bought is difficult to work with and does not burn as well.  Others, like from strahl&pittsch in the US are a dream. That wax is practically perfect in every way.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...