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How do you cool your wax?


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Hi guys & gals

I haven't posted in a while but I got a question for you all. How do you cool your wax for pouring?

I've tried several ways and got different results each time and it peaked my curiosity.

I use strictly EZsoy. Heat to 160-170 add dye, FO at about 150 and pour at about 105-106.

I tried immersing my pour pot in cold water about half way up to bring down the temp while stirring continually. This method gives me my best results, nice creamy smooth tops. A bit labor intensive but the best outcome.

I tried using a fan blowing on the pots to remove heat stirring periodically to balance out the temp in the pot. While this takes longer, it produces a dull sand paper like texture on the surface.

I tried letting them stand and just cool at room temp and this method takes a real long time, 4-6 hours or more and produces an OK finish.

I've been pouring about 50 candles a day for the last few weeks and pouring at the same temp all the time. Does,nt matter what scent or colors, the results are the same.

I was facinated by the different results, cooling different ways and pouring at the same temp.

Any comments out there? What do you all do?

Andy

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Very interesting! I just set my pour pot on an elevated wire rack and let it cool on it's own, stirring occasionally. I usually don't make more than three lbs at a time, and it generally takes 45-60 minutes to cool to very cloudy/slushy. I get good tops and no sinkholes doing this with MC soy (GW415) and 3% BW. I did try once the water immersion and it did speed things up considerably, but like you indicated you have to stay with it, where my curent method I can do other things while waiting.

Great thread topic!

geek

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Very interesting! I just set my pour pot on an elevated wire rack and let it cool on it's own, stirring occasionally. I usually don't make more than three lbs at a time, and it generally takes 45-60 minutes to cool to very cloudy/slushy. I get good tops and no sinkholes doing this with MC soy (GW415) and 3% BW. I did try once the water immersion and it did speed things up considerably, but like you indicated you have to stay with it, where my curent method I can do other things while waiting.

Great thread topic!

geek

I do the same, but with Tennessee Candles Celestial Soy (same stuff Plain 415)

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For me it depends on the weather. In the winter I put the pouring pot out in our unheated garage on the concrete floor. It cools down very quickly and my house doesn't smell really strong of candles. Sometimes I am making several scents that don't always mix well in the air. The most I get out there is usually 3 pots with another batch of wax melting, before the first is ready to be poured.

HTH,

Kim

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Hey Dianeb,

How are you, Thank you and the others that replied.

Frosting is a way of life with soy, I don't fight it, I co-exist with it. It is a great selling point if you work it properly. I notice more frosting when I use a heat gun on the tops than when I cool in water and pour at 106. Some dyes are more prone to frost than others. You will get heavier frosting with the darker deeper colors than with pastels.

I store all my candles in the garage winter & summer. I have no problems with this from -20 degrees to +95 degrees. Doesnt seem to bother the candles at all.

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