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Heating jars in the oven question


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I don't heat my jars in the oven but I know a lot of people do. 

 

 

For those that heat jars, do they get warmer, or stay warmer longer than if you were to just add the wax at 170+

Adding hot wax of course heats the jars but do you think that is any different than heating them up in the oven or a heat gun before pouring? 

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I didn't seem to notice a difference with C3 soy wax but my ambient temp was on the warmer side.  For Palm wax where you want those beautiful crystals to form, I noticed a big difference by heating the jars, pouring very hot and allowing it to cool slowly.  Just another example of each wax is different, even soy to soy.

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Coconut blends and soy blends that tend to form cavities (sink holes) (looking at you c1, C3 and 444!) definitely benefit from warmed jars. the more you can do to balance the rate of cooling the less poking and filling you will need to do later. 
 

I tend to use hot water versus an oven just because my shop does not have an oven and I like to wash glass before pouring for nice clean inside walls. If I had a dishwasher in the shop that would be ideal for my glass and ceramic. 

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10 minutes ago, TallTayl said:

Coconut blends and soy blends that tend to form cavities (sink holes) (looking at you c1, C3 and 444!) definitely benefit from warmed jars. the more you can do to balance the rate of cooling the less poking and filling you will need to do later. 
 

I tend to use hot water versus an oven just because my shop does not have an oven and I like to wash glass before pouring for nice clean inside walls. If I had a dishwasher in the shop that would be ideal for my glass and ceramic. 

 

 

I need to do more testing with heated jars, but I've always assumed that the wax would heat the glass to around the same temp. 

I have noticed better glass adhesion with 6006 when the jars are placed in the box to cool. I still check for hidden sinkholes but it helps quite a bit. 

 

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I've  purchased a warming lunch/casserole box. I know they get pretty hot esp. the warming element, so I only plug it in for a few min. and it heats jars and containers nicely.  They also stay insulated and warm while working. This is good for small batches and I fit approx 10-12  three in jars in one box. This seems and inexpensive way to heat jars outside the oven. My casserole box cost about $50.00. And the bonus is if it doesn't work well for you - you get a nice insulated food dish warmer!

Edited by Candlefriends
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On 6/19/2020 at 1:55 PM, TallTayl said:

Coconut blends and soy blends that tend to form cavities (sink holes) (looking at you c1, C3 and 444!) definitely benefit from warmed jars. the more you can do to balance the rate of cooling the less poking and filling you will need to do later. 

 

I am new and working with a coconut wax / beeswax blend.  I haven't noticed any cavities yet but I'm still pretty early on in the process.  What should I look out for to be "warned" if a candle may have a hidden cavity after being poured?

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46 minutes ago, jmspgh said:

 

I am new and working with a coconut wax / beeswax blend.  I haven't noticed any cavities yet but I'm still pretty early on in the process.  What should I look out for to be "warned" if a candle may have a hidden cavity after being poured?

Sunken areas around the wick, tiny cracks around the wick. And poke some all the way to the bottom with a long skewer.  You’ll feel the resistance change when you hit one.  Typically they form close to the wick as it is the path of least resistance for air to be sucked down into the cooling, shrinking center.

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I have a silly question about heating the jars before pouring the wax. I’ve wanted to put them in the oven to warm them (because sinkholes), but have been unsure about the best order of operations. Would you typically heat the jars and then continue with the wick assembly? I think that makes the most sense but I’m afraid of the jars being too hot to the touch. How hot should the jars be?

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5 hours ago, fruit.tart said:

I have a silly question about heating the jars before pouring the wax. I’ve wanted to put them in the oven to warm them (because sinkholes), but have been unsure about the best order of operations. Would you typically heat the jars and then continue with the wick assembly? I think that makes the most sense but I’m afraid of the jars being too hot to the touch. How hot should the jars be?

Lowest heat possible on your oven, most are around 200.  I always set wicks after taking out or the wax primer on the wick melts and I fear the sticky tab will give in the oven. 4 trays (12 jars)  fit in my oven. If I pull 1 tray of 12 at a time I can wick and pour fairly quickly and they stay warm. 

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I make palm wax candles and during the colder winter months I tend to heat the jars. If I don't, I often don't get the full crystal patterns throughout the jar but primarily on the bottom where the jar is coldest and the bottom thick. But I don't use the oven, I use my heat gun and give the inside of each jar a blast of hot air to heat the inside just prior to pouring. I also pour hot at about 205-210 degrees F. 

 

The rest of the year I don't have that problem with the crystal patterns.

 

Also, I haven't made soy candles in a long time so can't comment on that. I do recall experimenting with heating in the oven and my wicks often would wilt and the outer wax treatment melt away. I know some wick after heating but I just didn't care for that as the jars were too hot to handle and would often have to wait til they cooled thus making the heating a useless step. Additionally, I did not personally find any benefit to heating the jars to improve the behavior of the wax. For me working with soy I found that heating the wax itself to the proper degree was the best solution. Besides, some waxes are more prone to sinkholes, rough tops, frosting, etc. Plus the size of the jar made a huge difference. The larger the jars, the bigger the problems like sinkholes and frosting.

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22 hours ago, jmspgh said:

 

I am new and working with a coconut wax / beeswax blend.  I haven't noticed any cavities yet but I'm still pretty early on in the process.  What should I look out for to be "warned" if a candle may have a hidden cavity after being poured?

 

 

For me, and of course depending on the wax you use I would echo exaclty what TallTayl said abut running a skewer down the middle to expose any sinkholes that may of formed. This is especially important with 6006 and if you pour that wax at a cooler temperature. 6006 is notorious for sinkholes and the cooler you pour the harder they are to see in the middle. I've had many tops that looked perfect and once I ran a chop stick down the center it opened the hole up. I like to pour hotter with 6006 so the sinkholes are fully exposed during cooling and then use a heat gun to smooth them out. 

 

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I'm in Arizona.  100% not necessary.  When I was in Indiana 20 years ago, I did.  The only real impact was wet spots.  Wax and FO have changed significantly since then, so your mileage may vary.

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I am in AZ too. I've worked with a few different waxes and I did notice a difference when I heated my jars in the oven vs. room temp. As you know in AZ we constantly have the AC running. That's definitely something that keeps me on my toes when testing wicks.  I also let my candles cool in the cooling oven on a cooling rack on top of a cake pan and spread apart to try and cool as evenly as possible. Its easier for me since I make such small batches.

Edited by Marisa11
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I use a flattop pancake griddle in the winter to warm up cold jars, but don’t use as a technique for adhesion etc. Adhesion to me comes from pour temp and modifying the wax, or wax type. Some waxes are better than others. Heating jars etc seems like another step to avoid because if you have to do tons of candles dependent on that technique that would difficult. Heating jars with gun I found is inconsistent hot spots etc. Try the griddle they have adjustable temps and if you hate it well you can make burgers and pancakes.

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On 6/22/2020 at 9:08 AM, Marisa11 said:

I am in AZ too. I've worked with a few different waxes and I did notice a difference when I heated my jars in the oven vs. room temp. As you know in AZ we constantly have the AC running. That's definitely something that keeps me on my toes when testing wicks.  I also let my candles cool in the cooling oven on a cooling rack on top of a cake pan and spread apart to try and cool as evenly as possible. Its easier for me since I make such small batches.

 

It definitely makes a difference with the AC. :)  I'm finding that family and friends from out of state aren't comfortable at 78* in the house, so I have to adjust temps for them.  That always makes me curious as to how candles burn long-term in their 72-74* (not joking ) houses.

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@KrisS My family in southern CA hardly ever have their AC going. I love going back home. I am a huge fan of open windows and fresh air! I just need to test for all types of conditions. But for now I just want a perfect candle for MY home and decide if I want to branch out from there.

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