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Vicy

Are FO safe in soaps?

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Hi all, 

 

I've been making M&P soaps for a few weeks, but only using essential oils in them (I like researching which ones have benefits for skin) but the scent is very weak. For 6 standard soap bars I use around 30-40 drops. Feedback from friends is that the smell is quite weak. 

 

For some reason I just never thought of using fragrance oil in my soaps. I have a starter set that I've checked are ok for soap making, but for some reason I'm scared to use it. Does everyone use FO in soap, is it safe or is it harsh to skin? 

 

I just want a stronger scented soap! 

 

(I don't sell soap, I just like it as a hobby and often give as gifts)

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Many are safe, typically the supplier will indicate "skin safe" or something like that.  Sometimes it will say candles/incense only.  With the new laws around phthalate, more are skin safe than before.

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You will need to look at the IFRA certificate for every single aroma you put in your skin product, even essential oils. 
 

every single bottle, from every single supplier will be very different. 
 

essential oils are not inherently “safer” than fragrances. That is a BIG tale spun by MLM 

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52 minutes ago, TallTayl said:

You will need to look at the IFRA certificate for every single aroma you put in your skin product, even essential oils. 
 

every single bottle, from every single supplier will be very different. 
 

essential oils are not inherently “safer” than fragrances. That is a BIG tale spun by MLM 

 

 

Thank you! Is the IFRA usually stated on the product? Or is there a website? 

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32 minutes ago, Vicy said:

 

 

Thank you! Is the IFRA usually stated on the product? Or is there a website? 

For each fragrance they should be available from your supplier. If you do not see one definitely ask. Some usage rates of fragrances and essential oil’s are shockingly low

 

When you begin your research you may also want to check out IFRA.org. It takes a little bit of understanding to get started making sense of it all but with time and practice you’ll be able to quickly identify components such as eugenol that have very low rates.

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@Vicy What scents are you shooting for? Take a look at candlescience's soap safe FO's. They have the percentages list as to what the maximum usage rate is AND the IFRA certs to go along with them so you can see the correlations. You REALLY MUST get the IFRA thing down if you want to make scented bath & body products but your learning curve could be helped a LOT by looking at the direct correlation between their usage rates and the actual IFRA document. 

 

On 2/8/2020 at 1:34 PM, TallTayl said:

you’ll be able to quickly identify components such as eugenol that have very low rates.

 image.jpeg.65125e70f5c394d8f92f1d7a5461fd4e.jpeg
EUGENOL? We don't need no STINK'N EUGENOL! 

(psst: Eugenol is REALLY EVIL stuff in soap... Does BAD things to both the maker and the user. Stay away from eugenol...) (I'm only being a LITTLE over the top ;) ) 

Sponiebr
The Executor of Bad Ideas and Sundry Services 

 

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Yeah, some places list FO as “skin safe” but when you check the IFRA it’s for ridic low amounts, like *drops* per log of soap. 


 

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I was just getting feedback that my essential oils soaps didnt smell that strong, so thats why I wondered about FO - although I was really aiming for all of my homemade soaps to have skin benefits and be as natural as possible.

 

Eugenol? Is it in many oils? I just read its in clove and cinnamon oils, but is it something hidden in loads of ingredients??

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All essential oils (and FO) are comprised of many different aroma chemicals. The example I gave of Eugenol is that easy to ID scent in cinnamon and clove like you found. It is one example of a sensitizing aromachemical. . 
 

you can research the essential oils you are using and increase rate of appropriate. Instead of counting drops, weigh the melt and pour soap and scent using weight of scent at the chosen usage %. It will likely smell much stronger. 
 

be careful of falling into the therapeutic use trap. For one, we are not doctors so claims of anything lands us in medical quackery and practicing without a license. 
 

melt and pour soap is a cosmetic by current US standards and follows different labeling law than true “soap” made using oils and sodium hydroxide. melt and pour Usually uses surfactants to create the base which is easy to melt and remelt. Enjoy the craft for what it is and don’t worry about the all natural crowd. Melt and pour soap is not necessarily a ”natural” product but it sure can be fun to make and use. 

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