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CandleBaker

Fragrance Oil Effect on Melting Point

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Was wondering if anyone knows of a formula or rule for how the addition of fragrance oil affects the melt point of a candle? Say my wax has a melt point of 125F and I add 6% FO, what is the new melt point? I'm assuming it could vary a little depending on the viscosity of the oil, but is there a rule of thumb? Are there other factors I should consider beyond the melting point of the wax and the oil?

 

Thanks, Candle Scientists 😁

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You will likely get a LoT a of differing opinions here, but here is my take after testing components for (well a long, long time).

 

fragrance oils are comprised of infinite Combinations of variables. If you pick a lemon fragrance with the same name by 10 suppliers, it is likely they contain nothing similar aside from the name. 
 

aroma chemicals are blended to make something we recognize, then suspended in a carrier  (poor the intended application (which varies by lab). 
 

the melt point of the candle does not matter all that much in the end.  What matters is the melt behavior. Each wick will burn entirely differently depending on all the variables between the wax, fo, containers, etc. looking for a magic average just does not exist. 
 

case in point, I have easybeads coconut wax in 9 oz straight sided jars.  The baseline wick in this lot of wax is cd5. Three different fragrances all take completely different sized and series of wick. NG crackling Birch, for instance at a cd5 turned most of the candle liquid on the first burn whereas an Amber snuffed out on the same burn needing several sizes bigger than the baseline with eco10 just to stay lit. On the birch I had to blend different waxes and additives just so it would burn properly. 
 

so... choir.. we preach test, test, test. 

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Thank you, Tall Tayl. Amen to test test test 🙌

 

So the motivation for the question is to allow me to establish a level of confidence that my candles will remain largely solid as they sit in the back of a UPS truck in the heat of summer. I can predict the melt point of the wax as that information is readily available as it applies to whatever wax and additives make up the blend. The addition of the fragrance oil is the great unknown.

 

Fortunately my brother lives in the high desert of Southern California so summer test test test shipments will be key.

 

Thanks again!

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That’s actually a really hard question too because not every wax has the same emulsifiers and structure formers. Some have better combos than others and are more tolerant of heat and cold shifts. 

Depending on the Fo I have had some cause syneresis (leaked oils) and others not on the same package. Candles are weird. 
 

typically if you ship only mondays, Tuesdays and probably Wednesdays you can minimize time in hot trucks and mail depots. Likewise a trick I learned is to use lots and lots of packing peanuts to insulate the candles. Some have gone so far as to freeze the peanuts first but man that is time and space consuming. 

 

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5 hours ago, CandleBaker said:

Thank you, Tall Tayl. Amen to test test test 🙌

 

So the motivation for the question is to allow me to establish a level of confidence that my candles will remain largely solid as they sit in the back of a UPS truck in the heat of summer. I can predict the melt point of the wax as that information is readily available as it applies to whatever wax and additives make up the blend. The addition of the fragrance oil is the great unknown.

 

Fortunately my brother lives in the high desert of Southern California so summer test test test shipments will be key.

 

Thanks again!

I live in Southern CA, and I do have little bit of information regarding UPS truck.  During hot summer when temperature is around 110F in the desert area, temperature in back of UPS truck is about 146F. (UPS driver showed me his thermometer.)  I even drove around with candles in my car with full A/C on, and it still caused lots of seepage.

 

Phoenix AZ, Las Vegas NV, and Palm Springs CA have similar weather during summer time.  At this moment, I have no clue how to ship or deliver any candle to desert area during hot summer.  

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