Jump to content

Recommended Posts

#1

I need help urgently

Today, 07:15 PM
 
Hello there. My name is jade. I am quite new to candle making. I have pretty much mastered the craft, however I really really would appreciate some help. My candles are developing horrible white chunks and I can not seem to get rid. I go over the candles with the heat gun and store them thinking yes I won. But when I go back to them even a couple of hours later the same thing has occurred. I have googled like crazy it's not air bubbles I'd guess it's a form of frosting but I am only using little metal tins. Please help me as I have orders coming through but cannot possibly send these off. I have attached a picture you may need to zoom into selected candles.

20200113_185726.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are not familiar with your Kerax wax in United States, so we might not be helpful to you.  There could be few who might have tried it and give you advise, but I doubt it.  

 

It appears to me that your candle's problem is not air bubble nor frosting.  Whatever it is, heat gun treatment is making it worse.   I am suspecting that you might not have mixed the dye & wax well enough.  

 

Paraffin wax should not frost for very long time.  But then, I do not have any experience with Kerax wax, so I cannot speak with 100% confidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

would you be able to pour a very thin new top on them? 

 

Something with the difference in temp from the main candle and heat gunned top is causing uneven crystallization of your wax. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No expert here by any means but I think that might be scale wax/spa wax . I had the same thing happen to me while messing with 2281. I don't remember what caused it because it only happened once and I failed to take notes because I disliked it so much. Maybe too much FO in a wax that holds 3% or additives you may have used. Did you use any additives, Vybar, mineral oil, Crisco? I wanna say it  might have been the temperature it was poured, because I did a lot a different temps trying to achieve a mottling effect with that wax.

 

Edited by CaptnKush

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I would take a couple of those. Remedy and take temp up to 180 thoroughly stir to make sure your day and fragrance full incorporated.  Pour at 170 - 175..

Heat gunning. If you melt top make sure you wait long enough for wax to cool down. Somethings with heat gunning you think it’s not going to work, but give it ample time to check result.

It could also be your dye!

 

Advice, stop selling at moment and work out the kinks with your wax. You need to know what variables can cause problems with your wax recipe and how to prevent. You should be rock solid with your ambient and pour temp etc,  This will help you in the long run, instead of not knowing what is causing your issues.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys thank you so much I do use vybar but only 2%

I only use 10% the wax can hold 12% 

I  mix for about 1 min fragrance and colour.

I found a new blend wax part parafin part palm wax the natural vegetable fat? Do you think this could help. I pour at around 175f.i heat the tins and I let the top seal then I trim the wicks to put on lids and store. 

 

I hope this is clearer many thanks xx

Jade 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your P9056 is pillar candle wax.  Only paraffin Kerawax that is for container candle is 4105 (the one used in Royal Wedding of Prince Harry).  

 

It is recommended to stir vigorously for 2 minutes here in US for mixing wax, FO & dye.  I am not sure about Kerawax, but I believe it should be the same with any wax.  My suggestion is to try 4105.

 

Vybar can produce marbleized look to the top open portion in container candles.  This could be one of the reason also.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi thank you so much for your reply. On the suppliers website it says parafin container wax. And then that number. But I am a newbie so you're probably right.

I am going to order the mixed blend wax palm oil and part parafin and also stop using dye do you think this could help x

 

Thank you

The vybar helps as I promote the strong scent throw in my candles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What temperature should I pour at for best results please xx I melt at 180 and pour at 175.... is this ok 

 

 

I wont add a top just incase so il just give them to family and try a new batch with the mixed wax 

 

Xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my suggestion. Get your wax and pour a couple candles so you can see how it works plain. Use those candles for a control example. Next do some with vybar, and do some with the wax and color, then do some wax, vybar and color. Pick three fragrances to do test with for each set of tests. You have to be a bit of a scientist to find out what is causing the problem. It sound like maybe the vybar but you MUST test.

 

Everytime you add any variable your wax will react. So if you buy dye from one manufacturer and then switch it can cause problems.

Even wicks can vary even though they may have the same name.

 

Regarding pour temp. Find out from the place you buy your wax what the suggested pour temp is for your wax. Most paraffins I have worked with like a hot pour temp 170 - 175, but don’t assume that for your wax as I have never heard of it.

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What temperature should I pour at for best results please xx I melt at 180 and pour at 175.... is this ok 

 

 

I wont add a top just incase so il just give them to family and try a new batch with the mixed wax 

 

Xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much for your advice. I will deffo give all the examples you gave a shot. I suppose it is a science. 

 

I will order the mixed wax and different wicks. 

 

Thank you again. I suppose we need a liss to learn. Will update results xxx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While vybar can “allow” a wax to hold more fragrance, the hot throw result can be the exact opposite of what you intend.  Vybar is notorious for “locking” fragrance is used at too high of a %.  2%, believe it or not, is pretty high.
 

Your commercially available wax blend likely includes a polymer like vybar or a similar product already, which could cause the appearance issues and performance issues later. 
 

it’s not how much fragrance you add, it’s achieving the right balance between the wick, wax, and fragrance to combust the candle at the right range of temp to smell it.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, TallTayl said:

would you be able to pour a very thin new top on them? 

 

Something with the difference in temp from the main candle and heat gunned top is causing uneven crystallization of your wax. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi yes I have the right wicks everything. I think it could be my pouring maybe. I have tried the candles without vybar and they do not let off enough cold throw sadly. I will deffo give the mixed wax a try without vybar as everything else was pretty much mastered just this white spots deep inside the candle. I have been following manufacturers guidelines on temp but will try pour a little cooler than usual. 

 

Thank you guys 

 

X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one lesson chandling for the last couple of decades has taught me is how little I truly know about chandling.  The craft has taught me humility, since when I claim to have mastered a wax, the next candle proves me totally wrong. 
 

I wish I had access to a lab with a wax, wick and fragrance chemist to truly understand the relationship between all of the variables.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry if I sounded arrogant. My humility brought me to the forum to ask for help. Perhaps I should have written I was confide t in my product until...   

 

 

Thank you

X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No I’ll feelings intended. I promise. Chandling is a very technical and humbling craft.
Many of us got our rear ends handed to us over the last couple of years between changes in wax (that were denied by manufacturers until forced to admit problems), fragrance manufacturers (a suspicious series of fires overseas where aroma chemicals are produced, pressure to keep bargain basement prices, new ifra and California laws), tariffs, shipping increases,  you name it. 

 

once we remain humble and learn the range of acceptable and normal in ourselves and our products the rest is much easier. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No worries at all xx

For sure you need to be passionate about those business haha otherwise it's very easy to crack xx

 

Thanks again will update with good news soon I hope x

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like mottling or "fingernailing" to me. It's been discussed several times.

Here

Here

And here

And several more threads.

(I think fingernailing is the term to use... It seems to have two meanings, as far as I can tell.)

I had to zoom in a lot on the picture to get an idea of what was going on. Maybe it's me, but candles of the same color seem to have the same or very near degree of imperfections. First impression was that it's either the dye or fragrance, although if batches are melted separately and poured at different times something amiss (measuring mistakes, pouring too hot/cold, different cooling rates, etc.) in that process may be at fault as well. I'm inclined to say it's the fragrance (Isn't it always?). Working with vegetable waxes I know all too well how much a single fragrance's performance can differ from another.

 

Some of the additives mentioned in the threads: petrolatum, vybar, stearic, and universal additive.

I don't work with paraffin, but it appears that 2% vybar may be too much. I would start at .5% additive and increase in .5% increments as needed. Although the wax may be listed as taking up to 12% fragrance, 10% fragrance may be a bit much. Many waxes are labeled as being able to take high percentages, however, what isn't stated on the label is how the wax performs at those percentages. In addition, the fragrance itself and its quantity can also influence the amount of vybar required and how the vybar behaves. Unfortunately, this means testing each fragrance and tailoring additive load for that fragrance.

Edited by Kerven

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...